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Albert Ansmann
,
Jens Bösenberg
,
Gérard Brogniez
,
Salem Elouragini
,
Pierre H. Flamant
,
Karlheinz Klapheck
,
Holger Linn
,
Louis Menenger
,
Walfried Michaelis
,
Maren Riebesell
,
Christoph Senff
,
Pierre-Yves Thro
,
Ulla Wandinger
, and
Claus Weitkamp

1608 JOURNAL OF APPLIED METEOROLOGY VOLUtd-32Lidar Network Observations of Cirrus Morphological and Scattering Propertiesduring the International Cirrus Experiment 1989: The 18 October 1989 Case Study and Statistical Analysis ALBERT ANSMANN,* JENS BOSENBERG? GI~RARD BROGNIEZ,# SALEM ELOURAGINI,@ PIERRE H. F~AMANT,@ KARLHEINZ KLAPHECK,& HOLOER LINN? LOUIS MENENOER,@ WALFRIED

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S.-E. Gryning
,
E. Batchvarova
, and
R. Floors

using long-term observations . Renewable Energy , 20 ( 2 ), 145 – 153 . Nakanishi , M. , 2001 : Improvement of the Mellor–Yamada turbulence closure model based on large-eddy simulation data . Bound.-Layer Meteor. , 99 , 349 – 378 . O’Connor , E. J. , A. J. Illingworth , I. M. Brooks , C. D. Westbrook , R. J. Hogan , F. Davies , and B. J. Brooks , 2010 : A method for estimating the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate from a vertically pointing Doppler lidar, and

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A. I. Carswell
,
A. Fong
,
S. R. Pal
, and
I. Pribluda

the 1989 and 1991 campaigns of the Experimental Cloud Lidar Pilot Study. Useful lidardescriptors are introduced to specify the bottom-, top-, and midcloud altitudes. These are used to describe thebehavior of cloud vertical location and vertical extent during several months of observations using a dualwavelength (1064 and 532 nm) Nd:YAG lidar at Toronto. Frequency distributions of cloud height and cloudthickness are presented and the relationship of the lidar descriptors to cloud properties are

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E. W. Eloranta
,
J. M. King
, and
J. A. Weinman

kilometer of the atmosphere havebeen measured remotely with lidar. Wind speed determinations were made by observing the motion ofnaturally occurring aerosol density inhomogeneities. Lidar wind measurements compare favorably withsimultaneous pilot balloon observations of the wind.1. Introduction Knowledge of the spatial and temporal variabilityof wind structure is often required by applied meteorologists. Such activities as aviation takeoffs and landings, prediction of air pollution dispersal, rocket

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Kenneth Sassen

. Moreover,the iidar has detected changes in cloud layer structure and ice-water balance brought about by aerialseeding operations which are quite distinct from the background conditions, indicating that lidar observations may also find application as part of a physical evaluation method of seeding effects, it is concludedthat despite the range limitations of lidar, the application of the remote sensing techniques can makeimportant contributions to orographic cloud seeding operations and research.1

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Kenneth Sassen

1978 K E N N E T H S A S S E N 73Air-Truth Lidar Polarization Studies of Orographic Clouds KENNETH SASSEN1Department of Atmospheric Science, University of Wyoming, Laramie 82071(Manuscript received 31 May 1977, in final form 30 August 1977)ABSTRACT The results of a field program of coordinated lidar and aircraft observations of orographically inducedclouds are reported. An

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William Viezee
and
John Oblanas

JUNE 1969WILLIAM VIEZEE AND JOHN OBLANAS369Lidar-Observed Haze Layers Associated with Thermal Structurein the Lower Atmosphere'WILLIAM VIEZEE AND JOHN OBLANASSlanford Research Institute, Menlo Park, Calif.(Manuscript received 26 December 1968, in revised form 14 February 1969)ABSTRACTDaytime observations of the vertical temperature and humidity structure in the atmosphere below 1 kmmade with a Cricketsonde rocket system are compared with simultaneous observations from a ruby lidar(laser radar

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W. L. Smith
and
C. M. R. Platt

, Aspondale, Victoria, Australia (Manuscript received 13 January 1978, in final form 2 September 1978)ABSTRACT Cloud altitudes specified from the Infrared Temperature Profile Radiometer on the Nimbus 5 satelliteare compared with simultaneous observations by radiosonde and ground.based ranging measurementsconducted with the lidar system at CSIRO in Aspendale, Victoria, Australia, during September 1976.The results show that the cloud altitudes deduced by the COs channel absorption method are in

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William P. Hooper
and
Edwin W. Eloranta

measurements coupled with observationsmade by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), whichinclude 12 radiosonde soundings, 8 kytoon profiles,and regular half-hour surface observations, provide adetailed picture of the diurnal planetary boundary layer(PBL) wind evolution. The speed, direction and rmsvariation of the wind were profiled by lidar. The rmsvariation measures a combination of the turbulenceand the mean wind shear in the boundary layer. Considerable research effort has been devoted to understanding

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Rob K. Newsom
,
David Ligon
,
Ron Calhoun
,
Rob Heap
,
Edward Cregan
, and
Marko Princevac

few tens of meters. By repeating these scans, it is possible to observe how these quantities evolve in time. However, these measurements form only an incomplete picture of the state of the flow, and current technical constraints restrict the rate at which ABL volumes can be sampled. Four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) represents one potentially powerful method that can be used to retrieve three-dimensional, time-varying wind and temperature fields from Doppler lidar observations

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