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Edward S. Maykut

grid pointhaving clouds above that reference level is calculated intenths. Each of three output maps is prepared on BCD(Binary Coded Decimal) tape for off-line printing in theform of a 100X 100 grid covering a selected portion ofthe NWP octagonal grid area. The program output consists of 3 maps, each of 100'x 100 points. Since this program is considered to be experimental, no special emphasis was placed upon themethod of output. Only a grossly scaled grid map forvisual comparison was prepared

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Paul Chamberlain
,
Lynne D. Talley
,
Bruce Cornuelle
,
Matthew Mazloff
, and
Sarah T. Gille

globally. Fig . 1. (a) Map of May 2021 snapshot Core and BGC Argo floats and (b) example of random BGC float locations. Green dots are core Argo floats, and blue dots are BGC floats. The BGC Argo Science and Implementation Plan ( Johnson and Claustre 2016 ) guides the design goals of the global BGC array. After some analysis of the spatial and temporal variability of BGC fields, Johnson and Claustre (2016) state “It was, therefore, concluded that initial deployments and operations should begin

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F. H. Schmidt

excluded.(5) If the observer faces in the direction of theupper-level flow, it was observed that the cyclonesmoved, on the average, to the right of the upper-levelcontours or isotherms. The algebraic means for the 92cases in comparison B were +17" for the contours inthe layer from 850 mb to 700 mb, +5" for the isotherms in the layer from 850 mb to 700 mb, + 11 " forthe contours in the layer from 700 mb to 500 mb, +12"for the isotherms in the layer from 700 mb to 500 mb,and +6" for contours of the 200

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Anthony G. Barnston
and
Jack L. Thomas

2038 JOURNAL OF CLIMATE AND APPLIED METEOROLOGY VOLUM-22Rainfall Measurement Accuracy in FACE: A Comparison of Gage and Radar Rainfalls ANTHONY G. BARNSTON AND JACK L. THOMASO~ice of Weather Research and Modification, ERL, NO/A. Boulder, CO 80303 (Manuscript received 29 June 1982, in final form 29 August 1983) The agreement of radar with raingage rainfall measurements during the second phase of the Florida

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ESEK S. NICHOLS

--- - - __ - - - - __ - - - - - - - - - Preferred method: Curve located by method of aver- ages------------------------------------------- TRANBBORMATION OF HYQROMETRIC FORMULA AND CURVETO TEMPERATURE FORM _____________________________Relation between dew point, relative humidity, and current temperature: Graphical representation- - - - Algebraic transformation, by substituting value ofhumidity - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _ - - - - - Graphical transformation- _________________________ COMPARISON OF DEW

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Renu Joseph
,
Thomas M. Smith
,
Mathew R. P. Sapiano
, and
Ralph R. Ferraro

are also compared with CMORPH, TMPA, a merged microwave product used in the creation of CMORPH called microwave combination (MWCOMB), and the GPCP 1DD daily data. Among these merged precipitation products used for comparison, TMPA is the only product that applies gauge corrections. Table 4 shows bias, correlation, and RMSD of the CHOMPS, CMORPH, and TMPA evaluated against the stage IV data ( Lin and Mitchell 2005 ). Figure 5 shows maps of the correlations and biases. This analysis is similar to

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D. Sirmans
and
R. J. Doviak

described. The mean Doppler velocity is estimated for multiple range locations bymeasuring the phase change of the complex echo envelope over time intervals equal to the pulse repetitionperiod. This technique, phase change per pulse pair, provides velocity estimates directly from samples ofthe Doppler time record to circumvent spectrum computation.1. Introduction A difficulty associated with utilizing the data from apulsed Doppler weather radar is the considerable computation and cost required to map

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CHARLES C. ALLEN

events later proved, the work of forecasbing for t,his new territ,ory was made verydifficult by tlw lack of such records for study and com-parison. Considering, t,hen, that during the first threeyears of the servic.e there was apparently no need for it, itspeaks we,ll for the foresight of the county agents that not only w~is the service c.ontinued for the fourth consecutiveyear in Stanislaus County, but was estended to SanJoaquin and Merced Counties as well. Their action was amply justified, for t

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R. S. Seaman

being analyzed, and (ii) the observational errorvariance relative to the variance of the trne field (noise-to-signal ratio). A large set of real data was analyzed using parameters chosen on the basis of interpolation theory. The analyseswere assessed by comparison against a set of withheld data. The result suggests that minimum E is a satisfactorycriterion for objectively choosing the Barnes parameters when the statistical properties of the true field and ofthe observational error are known in

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Darryn W. Waugh
,
Shane R. Keating
, and
Mei-Lin Chen

the spatial dependence of the FSLE λ S , and these relationships have been used to identify different dispersion regimes within ocean flows (e.g., Lacorata et al. 2001 ; Haza et al. 2008 ; LaCasce 2008 ). These studies have generally shown exponential spreading for small times and spatial scales ( λ S ~ constant and 〈 R 2 〉 ~ exp2 λ S t ) and slower algebraic growth for larger times and spatial scales ( λ S ~ δ − β and 〈 R 2 〉 ~ t 2/ β , with β in the range of 1–2), although there is

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