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John H. E. Clark and Scott R. Dembek

1714 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW VOLUME 119The Catalina Eddy Event of July 1987: A Coastally Trapped Mesoscale Response to Synoptic Forcing JOHN H. E. CLARK AND SCOTT R. DEMBEKDepartment of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania(Manuscript received 5 February 1990, in final form 14 December 1990) ABSTRACT The Catalina eddy that existed

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David W. Martin, Brian Auvine, and David Suchman

1936 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW VOLUME 112Synoptic Forcing and Control of Deep Convection on Day 261 of GATEDAVID W. IVIARTIN, BRIAN AUVINE AND DAVID SUCHMANSpace Science and Engineering Center, The University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, W153706 (Manuscript received 28 March 1983, in final form 23 July 1984) An evolutionary view is sought of a single cloud cluster. This cluster was chosen less for intensity than

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Louis W. Uccellini

2540MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEWVOLUME 112Comments on "Comparative Diagnostic Case Study of East Coast SecondaryCyclogenesis under Weak Versus Strong Synoptic-Scale Forcing"Louis W. UCCELLINIGoddard Laboratory for Aunospheric Sciences. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center. Greenbeli. MD 2077112 April 1984 and 6 September 1984In a recent paper, Pagnotti and Bosart (1984;hereinafter denoted PB) contrast different forcingmechanisms for weak and strong cyclones along theEast Coast of the United States. They

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of Mon-tana. and t.lie direction of the wind showed that tlie centre of! .--.- I 7 . .. - _- - -- , ----- __ - ____ - ..___- _-a fhll of .45 inch ;luring t h e preceding forty-eight hours; winds. by m., force 5. Moving ea$twai-(l during the day, tho depres-sioii appeared off the western coast of Irel;ind, where i t prob-__ - -- -- - _---As a peculiar feature of the liurricaue charted as viii. may be meritioned the unusually high latitude to which i t ascended be-fore recurving to tlie eastward

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, the H. s. Bothnia,, in N. 49O5!1/, W. 3 5 O351, rep~rt~iiig barometer 38.89 (733.S), mind nw., force !), liearysea, weat8her showery; the s. s. 6 Pavoliia,, in N. SOo 211, W. 23O 231, also reported wind aucl sea gradually hi%nliug fronrsouth to westward, sontherly wind of force 11, shifting to west-erly of force 10, barometer 28.60 (736.4). By the morning ofthe 4tl1, the centre of di,.;turbiince, having moved slowlynortheastward, was near N. 5 3 O , W. 2 5 O . The s. s. 6 Bhyu-land, near N. GOo

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Johannes M. L. Dahl

by Rotunno and Klemp (1985) , the base state is given by a unidirectional wind profile, where the x component of the base-state flow, , increases linearly with height from −15 to +15 m s −1 within the lowest 7500 m AGL and remains constant above. The y component of the base-state flow is zero. The thermodynamic base state is given by the Weisman and Klemp (1982) analytical profile. The storm was initiated using convergence forcing as described by Loftus et al. (2008) , using a minimum

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Uhart V. Relative Variahions of the Northwest Temperatures and the Horizontal Magnetic Force OfToronto, Washington, and San Antonio.20222628342Y2722ZG25242630332/2328374472.376/B72.G79,/O///oInpera tu res.M.Qx .-k42 23-- /7- /f-5-/f B+/30-- 3 ._-3- 5-5-4f /+CY-3r.-d-/42f /Uf 7-5f 2-3-/q-14.38-30-2/-22-20-17 -l/a.P si&f.9f 4+/o+/5f G-3+7+30f//f20-t //-13t-5-25- /4-3f 9f Y+I7+G-3+35+7f-9*f7f22+Bt-/i//t3f./7 -6..Q -$& 4- f 3Uf B+I7+s-/I- y- //- 1 4-7-3U-6-4- 20-20- /3-/3-24-/7-27-35-33- 28

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Alain Caya, René Laprise, and Peter Zwack

also appear several physical forcing terms. The contribution of these terms can either be combined with the other nonlinear terms of the equations in the SI scheme, or an inviscid interim time step can be performed without forcing, applying forcing corrections afterward. The former method is the more traditional one; we will refer to the second as the splitting method (SM) ( Marchuk 1974 ). To better understand the difference between the two methods, let us consider the following canonical

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had reached theAtlantic in the vicinity of Hal ifax, Nova Scotia, when the windshifted to northwesterly on the New England coast withincreasing force. The following maximum wind-velocities werereported : Barliegat City, New Jersey, 52 miles, nw. j Hatterasand Kittyhawk, North Carolina, 44, ne. ; Sandy Hook, NewJersey, 43, nw.; Block Island, Rhotle Inland, 46, n. Afterpassing east of the coast, this storm apparently moved in Rnortheast direction, following the geueral course of northAtlantic storm8

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Jonathan E. Martin

further elucidate the circumstances leading to the development of the snowband, output from a numerical forecast of this cyclone made using the University of Wisconsin–Nonhydrostatic Modeling System (UW-NMS) is used. UW-NMS is described by Tripoli (1992a , b) . The model employs a two-way interactive, moveable nesting scheme, which allows for the simultaneous simulation of large synoptic-scale forcing as well as frontal-scale forcing. Prognostic variables carried by the model include u, υ, w, and

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