Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 14 of 14 items for :

  • Boundary currents x
  • LatMix: Studies of Submesoscale Stirring and Mixing x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Jörn Callies and Raffaele Ferrari

current with vertical shear Λ) is imposed and remains fixed. Such a frontal-zone setup has been used extensively to study quasigeostrophic baroclinic turbulence (e.g., Bretherton and Karweit 1975 ; Salmon 1980 ; Haidvogel and Held 1980 ; Larichev and Held 1995 ) and submesoscale processes (e.g., Taylor and Ferrari 2010 ; Callies and Ferrari 2018 ). It assumes an infinite scale separation between the buoyancy gradient and the baroclinic eddies. The other extreme—the case in which the buoyancy

Full access
Angelique C. Haza, Tamay M. Özgökmen, Annalisa Griffa, Andrew C. Poje, and M.-Pascale Lelong

form of frontal instabilities ( Boccaletti et al. 2007 ; Fox-Kemper et al. 2008 ) or filaments arising from frontogenesis ( Capet et al. 2008 ; Badin et al. 2011 ; Zhong et al. 2012 ; Mensa et al. 2013 ). Dynamically, the controlling effects of geostrophy and strong stratification are no longer entirely dominant at the submesoscales and as such, these spatial and temporal scales are the resolution limit of current operational ocean models. In the Eulerian frame, active submesoscale motions

Full access
Anne-Marie E. G. Brunner-Suzuki, Miles A. Sundermeyer, and M.-Pascale Lelong

1. Introduction Submesoscale vortices and internal waves are closely linked by their generation mechanism, location, and scale. Internal wave (IW) wave breaking causes diapycnal mixing, resulting in patches of well-mixed fluid. Such IW wave-breaking events and mixed patches are ubiquitous, but sporadic in time and space [e.g., Stellwagen Bank ( Haury et al. 1979) , the California Current ( Gregg et al. 1986 ), off the California coast ( Alford and Pinkel 2000 ), the North Atlantic ( Polzin et

Full access
Anne-Marie E. G. Brunner-Suzuki, Miles A. Sundermeyer, and M.-Pascale Lelong

fluid is generated (e.g., Alford and Pinkel 2000 ). Such diapycnal mixing has been observed episodically in time and space (e.g., Gregg et al. 1986 ). However, episodic wave breaking is only one of many possible mechanisms that may generate mixed patches. Other mechanisms include baroclinic instability, deep convection or hydrothermal plumes, meddy–seamount interactions and boundary layer interactions (e.g., Send and Marshall 1995 ; Helfrich and Battisti 1991 ; Kunze and Sanford 1993 ; Thorpe

Full access