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Allison A. Wing, Suzana J. Camargo, Adam H. Sobel, Daehyun Kim, Yumin Moon, Hiroyuki Murakami, Kevin A. Reed, Gabriel A. Vecchi, Michael F. Wehner, Colin Zarzycki, and Ming Zhao

is a contribution to the process-oriented diagnostic effort of the NOAA MAPP Model Diagnostics Task Force. This study was supported by NOAA’s Climate Program Office’s Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program through Grants NA15OAR4310087, NA15OAR4310095, NA18OAR4310270, NA18OAR4310276, and NA18OAR4310277. Initial work on this study was performed while A. Wing was supported by a NSF AGS Postdoctoral Research Fellowship (AGS-1433251). Y. Moon was supported in part by a NSF AGS

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Xianan Jiang, Ángel F. Adames, Ming Zhao, Duane Waliser, and Eric Maloney

2010 ; Jiang et al. 2011 ) and surface heat fluxes from the objectively analyzed air–sea fluxes (OAFlux) project ( Yu et al. 2008 ) are also used to examine impacts of radiation and surface fluxes on MJO propagation. Daily output of rainfall and specific humidity from 20-yr simulations of 24 GCMs, participating in the MJO Task Force (MJOTF)/GEWEX Atmospheric System Study (GASS) MJO model intercomparison project ( Petch et al. 2011 ; Jiang et al. 2015 ; Klingaman et al. 2015 ) is also analyzed to

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Daehyun Kim, Yumin Moon, Suzana J. Camargo, Allison A. Wing, Adam H. Sobel, Hiroyuki Murakami, Gabriel A. Vecchi, Ming Zhao, and Eric Page

changes and the diagnostic results and of constructing the diagnostics using observations and reanalysis products. Acknowledgments This work is a contribution to the process-oriented diagnostics effort of the NOAA MAPP Model Diagnostics Task Force. We thank the Task Force members for their valuable comments during the course of this work. This study was supported by NOAA’s Climate Program Office’s Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections program through Grant NA15OAR4310087. D. Kim was also

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Alexis Berg and Justin Sheffield

relationship from soil moisture feedbacks (i.e., that greater SM–ET coupling in a model could, independently, also contribute to lower precipitation, through land–atmosphere feedbacks), the overwhelmingly negative correlation between precipitation and SM–ET coupling suggests it is mainly a result of precipitation forcing. In regions such as the northern United States, the westernmost and easternmost parts of Russia, southern Africa, and the eastern Amazon, mean summer precipitation explains around 50% or

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