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Katherine D. Zaba, Daniel L. Rudnick, Bruce D. Cornuelle, Ganesh Gopalakrishnan, and Matthew R. Mazloff

estimates from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction–National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis ( Kalnay et al. 1996 ) used as the atmospheric forcing in CASE. The hypothesis is that the reanalysis does not capture the effect of low-level clouds over the coastal CCS and estimates excessive shortwave radiative fluxes into the ocean. The increment absolute values are largest early in the assimilation, especially before 2010, suggesting this issue is improved in later years. Though we

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Ralph Timmermann, Peter Lemke, and Christoph Kottmeier

direction. A daily time step is applied. At continental boundaries a no-slip condition is prescribed, whereas ice may enter or leave the model domain due to advection at the oceanic boundaries of the model. The atmospheric forcing is derived from daily values of air temperature, relative humidity, and wind fields obtained from seven years (1986–1992) of the global analyses of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Spatially varying cloudiness is interpolated from monthly

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Leonel Romero, J. Carter Ohlmann, Enric Pallàs-Sanz, Nicholas M. Statom, Paula Pérez-Brunius, and Stéphane Maritorena

with Romero et al. (2013) . Several observational studies have recently investigated Lagrangian transport over a wide range of scales in deep water and coastal environments. Most studies have focused on the effects of submesoscale processes, wind forcing, and coastal rivers on Lagrangian transport and dispersion. Poje et al. (2014) presented surface drifter observations ([Grand Lagrangian Deployment (GLAD)] of Lagrangian dispersion for initial separations of 200 m and found good agreement with

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Nicolas Kolodziejczyk and Fabienne Gaillard

-called thermocline bridge ( Yeager and Large 2004 , 2007 ; Luo et al. 2005 ; Sasaki et al. 2010 ; Ren and Riser 2010 ; Li et al. 2012 ; Kolodziejczyk and Gaillard 2012 ). In the northeastern Pacific, stochastic atmospheric forcing is suspected to control the generation of decadal spiciness anomaly at midlatitudes ( Kilpatrick et al. 2011 ). In the southeastern Pacific (SEP), the generation of spiciness anomalies occurs at subtropical latitudes, at both interannual and decadal time scales ( Yeager and Large

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Tomoki Tozuka and Toshio Yamagata

seasonal cycle. As an extension of this study, we here examine the Pacific basinwide seasonal cycle to try to shed a new light on this topic. Among studies devoted to the understanding of the basinwide seasonal cycle, Meyers (1979) was the first to demonstrate that variations at the depth of 14°C isotherm propagate westward along 6°N all the way from the American coast to 145°E as the long nondispersive baroclinic Rossby wave. The origin of the waves is identified as forcing by the annual variation

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Tomoki Tozuka and Toshio Yamagata

seasonal cycle. As an extension of this study, we here examine the Pacific basinwide seasonal cycle to try to shed a new light on this topic. Among studies devoted to the understanding of the basinwide seasonal cycle, Meyers (1979) was the first to demonstrate that variations at the depth of 14°C isotherm propagate westward along 6°N all the way from the American coast to 145°E as the long nondispersive baroclinic Rossby wave. The origin of the waves is identified as forcing by the annual variation

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Warren M. Washington, Albert J. Semtner Jr., Claire Parkinson, and Louise Morrison

model could have affected the icedistribution. Moreover, their coupled model was drivenby annual mean, rather than seasonally varying, solarinsolation. They did not perform calculations withrealistic forcing to see what sea-ice distribution resulted.The thermodynamics of their model was considerablysimpler than that used here, but it did include transport. In this paper, we consider that aspect of the sea-iceproblem dealing solely with thermodynamics. Theimportant processes of ice transport will

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J. H. Lee, J. P. Monty, J. Elsnab, A. Toffoli, A. V. Babanin, and A. Alberello

of waves in the presence of wind forcing. The objective of the current study is to improve the overall understanding of wave-induced turbulence and its influence on the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation near the water surface. In particular, we seek to address and observe depth and phase dependencies on the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate close to the free surface due to wave-induced turbulence in the absence of wind shear stresses along the air–water interface. To this end

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P. Ryan Jackson and Chris R. Rehmann

scales showed no difference between mixing efficiencies for temperature-stratified and salt-stratified water. However, at a fixed Richardson number the Reynolds number for the temperature-stratified case was lower than that for the corresponding salt-stratified case. To subject both scalars to the same stratification and forcing, they suggested performing experiments in which a two-component, stable stratification is mixed. Differential diffusion can affect the prediction and interpretation of

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P. Ryan Jackson and Chris R. Rehmann

scales showed no difference between mixing efficiencies for temperature-stratified and salt-stratified water. However, at a fixed Richardson number the Reynolds number for the temperature-stratified case was lower than that for the corresponding salt-stratified case. To subject both scalars to the same stratification and forcing, they suggested performing experiments in which a two-component, stable stratification is mixed. Differential diffusion can affect the prediction and interpretation of

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