Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 917 items for :

  • Algebraic map comparison x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Leo O Lai
and
Jed O. Kaplan

, its 10% bound tolerance will equate to 2°C, in other words, no single interpolated value within the interval can exceed 2°C of the original interval mean. 3. Results and discussion a. Accuracy and comparison with other methods In this section we compare our newly proposed interpolation method with existing mean-preserving smoothing algorithms including the polynomial method with mixed boundary conditions described by D03 and the recursive algebraic method of RM01 . We evaluate each

Open access
JEROME NAMIAS

: (1) to afford a look a t the 5-daymean centered 2 days in advance so that comparison withearlier observed mean maps and with the trend map maypermit further inferences regarding evolution, and (2) toobtain estimates of 5-day mean temperature anomdiesas described below.DECEMBEB 1958 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW 469FI(JUIZE 2.-(A) 500-mb. contours for the period April 24-28, 1958 objectively predicted by the summation method (see text). Contoursdrawn for every 400 feet and labeled in tens of feet

Full access
Waltraud A. R. Brinkmann

) eigenvector analysis of sealevelpressure for January and July indicates major shiftsin circulation patterns in the early 1920's and againin the early 1950's. Dzerdzeevskii (1966), using acirculation-type catalog, identified three circulationepochs during the first half of this century which aresimilar to the epochs defined by Kutzbach. Girs(1966) found breaks in the frequency of daily hemispheric circulation types in the 1920's, 1930's and1940's. Comparison of these times of change (Table1) shows that

Full access
Charles E. Schemm
and
Frank B. Lipps

simplified and can be solved algebraically. A scale analysis of the full transport equations is offered as partialjustification for the present approach in the case of nearly isotropic turbulence. The problem studied is that of a well-mixed layer bounded above by a region of strong stable stratification. The present model gives a significant improvement in the representation of the large-scale variables as compared with the more conventional eddy viscosity approach. In three experiments

Full access
Joseph T. Schaefer
and
Charles A. Doswell III

prelimina~ one. This restriction isnot as harmful as it first appears since, at the expenseof noise in the analyzed field (and thus the derived468 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW VOLUM- 107 TABLE 1. Statistical error analysis comparison between Gaussian interpolation and variational adjustment of a preliminarywind analysis.Variationalwind adjustment Gaussianrms Algebraic rms Algebraicu

Full access
Peter C. Chu
,
Robin T. Tokmakian
,
Chenwu Fan
, and
L. Charles Sun

. Oceanographers have constructed to include inhomogeneities and anisotropies associated with the presence of topography, and to reflect in a way the adaptation of the ocean fields to the topography. Utilization of ocean topography may change the weighting operation, in (1) , into a mathematical operator, , that maps the innovation (at the observational points) directly onto the grid points, where could be different in (1) and (5) when vertical interpolation is involved. The difference, Δ c = c

Full access
Louis St. Laurent
and
Harper Simmons

reviewed current knowledge of the diffusivity of turbulence diffusivities throughout the oceans. Estimates of this parameter come from several sources, including direct measurements, parameterizations of oceanic finestructure, and indirect estimates based on algebraic and statistical inversions of hydrography. While each of these methods require assumptions with potential limitations, results are generally consistent among water mass–based comparisons. Diffusivities in the ventilated waters of the

Full access
Walter H. Hoecker

30- veering in westerly flow. Boundary-layer trajectory estimates made from geostrophic vectors are easily constructed graphicallyon sea level weather charts, and trajectory forecasts can be made by using National Weather Service foreeast maps distributed by facsimile. L~yer-average wind and adjusted surface wind trajectories are moresuited to post analysis by computer since the data are available on magnetic tapes and the wind vector dataare processed objectively.1. Introduction In

Full access
W. K. Dewar

useful to review the results of a purely linear analysis of (2.6) and (2.7) . Neglecting all nonlinear terms yields (after some algebra) The normal modes of the above are extracted by adding (2.9) and (2.10) , the latter having been multiplied by an unknown coefficient, α. The aim of a normal mode analysis is to produce an equation in one variable only. Some straightforward algebra demonstrates that α values of yield two equations of the form ( h ± ) t − β ± ( h ± ) x = − β ± ϕ x , (2

Full access
J.-P. Vergnes
,
B. Decharme
,
R. Alkama
,
E. Martin
,
F. Habets
, and
H. Douville

) were used as the second criterion in the proposed methodology. Fig . 4. Data sources used to delimit the aquifer basin boundaries: (a) groundwater resources of the world according to the WHYMAP (BGR and UNESCO; http://www.whymap.org ), (b) the BGR geological units by age (BGR; http://www.bgr.de/karten/igme5000/igme5000.htm ), and (c) the simplified lithology of France (BRGM; http://infoterre.brgm.fr ). The comparison of the BDRHF map ( Fig. 3 ) with the two selected classes of WHYMAP, the IGME

Full access