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Corrine Noel Knapp, Shannon M. McNeeley, John Gioia, Trevor Even, and Tyler Beeton

studies suggest a desire from land use permittees for greater management flexibility within and between seasons, and on all levels (RMP, operational, and permitting) ( Charnley et al. 2018 ; Neely et al. 2011 ; Warziniack et al. 2018 ). However, this would require additional monitoring, which agencies often do not have the resources or time for ( Veblen et al. 2014 ). b. Vulnerability of land-based livelihoods Vulnerability is a population’s exposure to climate hazards (e.g., extreme heat), their

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Shannon M. McNeeley, Tyler A. Beeton, and Dennis S. Ojima

: A global overview of drought and heat-induced tree mortality reveals emerging climate change risks for forests . For. Ecol. Manage. , 259 , 660 – 684 , doi: 10.1016/j.foreco.2009.09.001 . Amberg, S. , Kilkus K. , Gardner S. , Gross J. E. , Wood M. , and Drazkowski B. , 2012 : Badlands National Park: Climate change vulnerability assessment. Natural Resource Rep. NPS/BADL/NRR–2012/505. National Park Service, 340 pp . Bernard, H. R. , 2006 : Methods in Anthropology: Qualitative

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Matthew J. Bolton, William G. Blumberg, Lara K. Ault, H. Michael Mogil, and Stacie H. Hanes

1. Introduction Weather impacts everyone, whether or not people notice. Impacts can be psychological and/or physiological, on both small and large scales. At the individual level, people often find their mood influenced by weather; may fear lightning, tornadoes, and the potential destruction wrought by these and other dangerous meteorological phenomena; account for the effects of heat and cold through clothing choice; ascribe mentalistic states (i.e., thoughts, feelings, and intentions) to

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Vikram M. Mehta, Cody L. Knutson, Norman J. Rosenberg, J. Rolf Olsen, Nicole A. Wall, Tonya K. Bernadt, and Michael J. Hayes

institutes of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. Time and budgetary constraints limited the pilot study to agencies located in eastern and central Nebraska, with two exceptions: a meeting with the Nebraska City Adaptive Management Group held in southwest Iowa, across the river from Nebraska City, and a meeting with the Bureau of Reclamation personnel in Grand Island, Nebraska, that included agency staff members in McCook, Nebraska, and Billings, Montana, by conference call. Each interview began with

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Peter Rudiak-Gould

them unfold on our farm has been harrowing nonetheless.” —Jack Hedin, farmer ( Hedin 2010 ) “[Y]ou can’t actually see global warming.” —Anonymous BBC environment correspondent (quoted in Anderson 1997 , p. 122) “Islands that used to be our playgrounds have disappeared … Some scientists say there is no rise in sea-level but the tide is rising. We have seen it with our own eyes.” —Koloa Talake, former Prime Minister of Tuvalu (quoted in Connell 2003 , p. 98) Not only do the answers diverge, they

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Randy A. Peppler

drought; and observations of clouds and of sun and moon visibility as general indicators of upcoming weather. a. Animals Garrett, a Kiowa farmer, said he has noticed more armadillos on his properties, which he attributed to “heat down south,” causing them to move farther north. Milton, a Comanche rancher, said, “And the little horny toads—I haven’t seen many of them, I haven’t seen one in five years. Yeah, it worries me, and I don’t know what the cause is.” Randall, a Kiowa farmer and extension

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Sandy Smith-Nonini

1. Introduction As a gregarious adolescent, riding ponies and climbing trees in the 1960s, summer was my favorite season. But things have changed. The year 2016 was the warmest year since modern recordkeeping began in 1880, and the third year in a row of record-breaking surface temperatures, according to both NASA and the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ( NASA 2017 ). So summer is now a deadly season: 70 000 people died from a 2003 heat wave in Europe ( Robine et al. 2008

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Walker S. Ashley, Stephen Strader, Troy Rosencrants, and Andrew J. Krmenec

Limitless City: A Primer on the Urban Sprawl Debate. Island Press, 309 pp. Greene, R. P. , and Pick J. B. , 2012 : Exploring the Urban Community: A GIS Approach. 2nd ed. Prentice Hall, 432 pp. Greene, R. P. , and Pick J. B. , 2013 : Shifting patterns of suburban dominance: The case of Chicago from 2000 to 2010 . J. Maps , 9 , 178 – 182 . Hall, S. G. , and Ashley W. S. , 2008 : The effects of urban sprawl on the vulnerability to a significant tornado impact in northeastern Illinois

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Susan A. Crate

physical manifestations of power include the pollution of the river, which imperils human health and fish populations; the lack of governmental efforts to supply populations with clean drinking water; and the inequitable living conditions Viliui Sakha must accept in comparison to residents of mining towns and cities where they have running water, central heat, etc. In the too-much-technika story, many elder Viliui Sakha claim that the sun, moon, and stars are affected by all the “going into the cosmos

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