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Pierre Gauthier, Philippe Courtier, and Patrick Moll

JUNE 1993 GAUTHIER ET AL. 1803Assimilation of Simulated Wind Lidar Data with a Kalman FilterPIERRE GAUTHIER, * PHILIPPE COURTIER, AND PATRICK MOLL CNRM, Mdt~o-France, Paris, France (Manuscript received 12 May 1992, in final form 30 November 1992) ABSTRACT The object of this paper is to present some results

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Patrick Minnis, Joseph M. Alvarez, Kenneth Sassen, David F. Young, and Christian J. Grund

Company, Hampton, Virginia,- * Department of Meteorology. University of Utah. Salt Lake City. Utah,- Department of Meteorology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (Manuscript received 24 March 1989, in final form 12 June 1990)ABSTRACT Cirrus cloud radiative and physical characteristics are determined using a combination of ground-based,aircraft, and satellite measurements taken as part of the FIRE Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO) duringOctober and November 1986. Lidar

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Françoise Guichard, David B. Parsons, Jimy Dudhia, and James Bresch

simulations of 29 May 1998 Table 1. Summary of the data from the ARM SGP Central Facility used in this study Table 2. The 24 h-mean surface shortwave downward flux at the surface—time average from 0000 LT to 0000 LT next day Table 3. The 24-h-mean surface shortwave downward flux for the period 27 May–2 Jun 1998 (time average from 0000 to 0000 LT next day). Cloud cover information is for daytime only; observations based on the radar, lidar, and radiometer datasets * The National Center for Atmospheric

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Andrew J. Heymsfield, Karen M. Miller, and James D. Spinhirne

traverse appeared to be near the top of another, much denser cloud. The fourth traverse was inmoderately dense cloud, although the sun was visible.The fifth traverse initially was in dense cloud, althoughvariability in cloud density was noted, and the finaltraverse was at the cloud base. The cloud tended to bethicker on the western side of all traverses. These observations are consistent with the lidar data. The observations are also consistent with those of Smith et al.(1990), who found denser cloud

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Nedjeljka Žagar, Ad Stoffelen, Gert-Jan Marseille, Christophe Accadia, and Peter Schlüssel

the tropics by using the multivariate covariance model, and we compare the impacts of mass and wind observations in the tropical assimilation using these “realistic” background-error spectra. Mass–wind (im)balances are illustrated in the context of observing system simulation experiments (OSSE). The observing system in question is the spaceborne Doppler wind lidar (DWL), the first satellite to provide global coverage of wind profiles ( Stoffelen et al. 2005b ). The mission, called Atmospheric

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David B. Parsons, Melvyn A. Shapiro, and Erik Miller

special observations over west Texas on 12–13 May 1985, including serial rawinsonde ascents, ground-based Doppler lidar, and other in situ and remote sensors. We will compare our results to the behavior of the dryline during the day and discuss our findings in the context of the diurnal cycle of the dryline and associated regional circulations. The measurements for the present study were taken at the National Weather Service Office in Midland, Texas, as part of the Texas Frontal Experiment (TEXEX

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Edward I. Tollerud, Fernando Caracena, Steven E. Koch, Brian D. Jamison, R. Michael Hardesty, Brandi J. McCarty, Christoph Kiemle, Randall S. Collander, Diana L. Bartels, Steven Albers, Brent Shaw, Daniel L. Birkenheuer, and W. Alan Brewer

-magnitude moisture flux layer and overestimates the flux values very near the surface. The set of moisture flux cross sections along the northern flight leg in Figs. 6 and 7 also display quite similar jet features. The section in Fig. 6 has been produced from the dropsonde profiles performed along the leg, whereas the section in Fig. 7 is constructed from lidar observations. Apart from the obvious increase in detail in the lidar section, the two sections are similar in jet magnitude and placement along

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Katja Friedrich, David E. Kingsmill, Cyrille Flamant, Hanne V. Murphey, and Roger M. Wakimoto

better monitor the temporal and spatial variation of Froude numbers. 6. Summary and conclusions The kinematic and moisture structure of a slow-moving, nonprecipitating cold front observed in west-central Kansas on 10 June 2002 during IHOP has been examined with a wide array of ground-based and airborne instrumentation that included in situ sensors, sounding systems, Doppler radars, a microwave radiometer, and a differential absorption lidar. Intensive observations were collected across a ∼40-km

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David O'C. Starr and Donald P. Wylie

cloud fields as deduced fromsatellite and lidar observations. The cloud fields exhibited a high degree of persistent mesoscale organization onscales of 20-500 km reflecting corresponding scales of dynamic and thermodynamic structure/variability as onthe synoptic scale. Cloud generation was usually confined to layers less than 1 km deep (typically 0.5 km indepth) and cellular organization was evident in most cases irrespective of the thermal stratification. Multilayereddevelopment was prevalent (2

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Katja Friedrich, David E. Kingsmill, Cyrille Flamant, Hanne V. Murphey, and Roger M. Wakimoto

between the cold front and prefrontal boundaries. The role of these structures in convection initiation will be discussed combining the findings of Arnott et al. (2006) and Part I , with additional observations over a wide spatial domain of up to ∼100 km along the cold front. Section 2 provides a brief overview of the meteorological conditions for this case. Observing systems, including ground-based and airborne radar and lidar and in situ instruments, are described in section 3 , while their

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