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Juerg Schmidli, Brian Billings, Fotini K. Chow, Stephan F. J. de Wekker, James Doyle, Vanda Grubišić, Teddy Holt, Qiangfang Jiang, Katherine A. Lundquist, Peter Sheridan, Simon Vosper, C. David Whiteman, Andrzej A. Wyszogrodzki, and Günther Zängl

and turbulence, and (iii) the uncertainties associated with the parameterization of radiation transfer and surface–atmosphere interactions. Thus apart from an idealized topography, the setup of the simulations is as close as possible to real-case simulations. The models are run with comprehensive model physics including a radiation transfer scheme, land surface scheme, and turbulence parameterization. A large computational domain and periodic lateral boundary conditions are used in order to

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Yanping Li, Ronald B. Smith, and Vanda Grubišić

turbulent interaction between the valley air and the overlying atmosphere ( Figs. 13b , 14 ). The daily maximum mixed-layer depth was calculated according to (5) for the three WRF simulations ( Figs. 11 , 14 ). This gives H ∼ 1600 m and H ∼ 1400 m for the weak and moderate westerly cases as compared with H ∼ 1800 m (with mixed-layer top at 2800 m) for the quiescent case. This agrees with the observational results shown in Fig. 8 . 6. The valley depth and seasonal effects To extend our results

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Qingfang Jiang and James D. Doyle

1. Introduction Moist processes have been largely ignored in the majority of mountain-wave studies, partially because of the complexity associated with moisture and microphysical processes. Studies of the interaction between moist airflow and mesoscale topography can be broadly classified into two categories. The first category includes quasi-analytical studies with highly simplified representations of moist processes. For example, a set of two-dimensional steady-state linear wave solutions

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James D. Doyle, Saša Gaberšek, Qingfang Jiang, Ligia Bernardet, John M. Brown, Andreas Dörnbrack, Elmar Filaus, Vanda Grubišić, Daniel J. Kirshbaum, Oswald Knoth, Steven Koch, Juerg Schmidli, Ivana Stiperski, Simon Vosper, and Shiyuan Zhong

Schoeberl 1989 ). Mountain waves can have an important impact on the atmosphere because of their role in downslope windstorms ( Klemp and Lilly 1975 ); clear-air turbulence ( Clark et al. 2000 ); vertical mixing of water vapor, aerosols, and chemical constituents in the stratosphere ( Dörnbrack and Dürbeck 1998 ); potential vorticity generation ( Schär and Durran 1997 ); and orographic drag influence on the general circulation ( Bretherton 1969 ; Ólafsson and Bougeault 1996 ). Although numerical models

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Qingfang Jiang and James D. Doyle

paper presents a case study of an afternoon downslope westerly wind event documented during the intensive observational period (IOP) 12 of SRP, which took place in Owens Valley from 13 to 17 April 2004. The objective of this study is to examine the diurnal variation of flows in Owens Valley, which involves multiscale interactions among the large-scale westerlies, mountain waves, and differential heating within the boundary layer (BL). Over the past few decades, downslope windstorms and large

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