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Ernani de Lima Nascimento, Gerhard Held, and Ana Maria Gomes

METAR station closest to Indaiatuba ( Fig. 1b ). Soundings from the SBMT upper-air site ( Fig. 1b ) performed operationally at 0000 UTC [2100 local standard time (LST)] and 1200 UTC (0900 LST) are also examined. METARs were obtained from the Meteorological Network of Brazil’s Military Air Force ( http://www.redemet.aer.mil.br ), and sounding data from the Wyoming Weather Web of the University of Wyoming’s Department of Atmospheric Science ( http://weather.uwyo.edu/upperair/sounding.html ). Also

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John P. Monteverdi, Roger Edwards, and Gregory J. Stumpf

’s field of view. The Department of Defense’s Doppler radar at Edwards Air Force Base (KEYX; Fig. 3 ) observed the Rockwell Pass thunderstorm, though from a great distance ( Table 3 ). Since the level-II data for KEYX were not archived, the lower-resolution level III data had to be used instead. Unfortunately, since the KEYX radar was in clear-air mode on the day of the Rockwell Pass tornado, the highest reflectivity archived in this mode was 28 dB Z . Table 3. The height of the centerline of the

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O. H. DANIEL, H. W. BRANDLI, and J. ERNST

PICTURE OF THE MONTHHigh-Altitude Minuteman Exhaust Trail0. H. DANIEL-fqn American Airlines, Cape Kennedy Air Force Station. Fla.H. W. BRANDLI and J. ERNST-Detachment 11, 6th Weather Wing,Air Weather Service, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.1. INTRODUCTIONNear sunset on Oct. 26, 1970, Thomas Oliver, a meteor-ologist with the 58th Weather Reconnaissance Squadron,Kirtland Air Force Base, N. Mex., was flying in an RB-57aircraft above 70,000 ft over California between Edwardsand Vandenberg Air Force

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HENRY W. BRANDLI

UDC 551.W7.382.2:~1.6i6.1:651.515.22(084.1)(94)"1972.04.16"PICTURE OF THE MONTHReal Time ESSA 8 APT Tracked Over Australia Receivedat Florida Over 11,000 Miles AwayHENRY W. BRANDLI-Detachment 11. 6th Weather Wing, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.The ESSA 8 Automatic Picture Transmission (APT)subsystem consists of a camera and an FM transmitterdesigned to broadcast television pictures of the cloud coverbelow the satellite during daylight. During the recentApollo 16 lunar mission, ESSA 8 APT

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PICTURE OF THE MONTH

Aurora Borealis and City Lights

Henry W. Brandli

JULY1974 PICTURE OF THE MONTH 533PICTURE OF THE MONTH Aurora Borealis and City LightsHENRY W. BRANDL~~/)el. 11, 6 Weather Wing, Air Weather Service, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla. 329251 April 19741. Introduction A unique and valuable data system employed by theDepartment of Defense and the U. S. Air Force AirWeather Service (AWS) is now providing meteorological, geophysical, and

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CLEON J. BITER

. 1964, pp. 523-531.2. A. Court and H. A. Salmela, "Hourly Rawinsondes for aWeek," G R D Research Notes, No. 60, Geophysics ResearchDirectorate, Air Force Cambridge Research Cent,er, Bedford, 1961.3. A. J. Kantor, "Tropopause Definition and Hourly Fluctuations,"Environmental Research Papers, No. 41, Air Force CambridgeResearch Laboratories, Office of Aerospace Research, L. G.Hanscom Field, Mass., 1964, 23 pp.[Received Mwch 8, 19661Comments on "Picture of the Month"CLEON J. BITERU.S. Navy Weather

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FRANCES C. PARMENTER

FIGURE 2.-Aircraft view, 22,000 ft, 2047 am, May 8, 1970FIQURE 3.-Aircraft view, 26,000 ft, 2200 QMT, May 8, 1970.51IFIQURE 4.-Enlarged ESSA 9 view from figure 1, 2243 QMT, May 8, 1970.FIQURE 5.-Aircraftview, 26,000 ft, 2355 QMT, May 8, 1970.FIQURE 6.-Aircraft view, 26,000 ft, 0038 QMT, May 9, 1970.surface Low was located in the Gulf of Alaska (K).On the same day, Thomas Eeegan departed fromMcClellan Air Force Base, Calif., on a special recon-naissance flight that followed a northward path

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HENRY W. BRANDLI, JOHN W. OLIVER, and RAMON J. ESTU

UDC 551.521~2:551.508.21:551.507.982.2:551.578(084.1)PICTURE OF THE MONTHNOAA 2 Scanning Radiometer Visual and InfraredImagery Received Real-Time Over a 50,000-MileTransmission LinkHENRY W. BRANDLI, JOHN W. OLIVER, and RAMON J. ESTU-Detachment 1 I, 6th WeatherWing, Air Weather Service, Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.ITOS D (NOAA 2) wns launched on Oct,. 15, 1972. Itssimultaneous scanning radiometer imagery of video andinfrared is a new system designed to transmit imngerybelow the satellite night

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JOHN E. SHAUGHNESSY and THOMAS C. WANN

UDC 551.515.S:551.S7S.1@34.1)(265.2)1`1973.04.04"PICTURE OF THE MONTHFrontal Rope in the North PacificJOHN E. SHAUGHNESSY and THOMAS C. WANN-Weather Support Unit, Headquarters,1st Weather Wing (MAC), Hickam Air Force Base, HawaiiA line of clouds or "frontal rope" is often, but not traversing the central Pacific. Cloud tops along theseinvariably, seen on high-resolution weather satellite data lines, which are believed to be associated with convectivecoincident with the leading edge of cold

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ARTHUR H. SMITH JR.

PICTURE OF THE MONTHA Turbulent RegionARTHUR H. SMITH, JR.-EnvironrnentzUS. Air Force, Washington, D.C.I/ TechnicatI Applications Center,Satellite phot,ographs of certain atmospheric conditionscan frequently be used in locating specific regions of highrisk of turbulence occurence (high risk areas).In particular,the cloud patterns associated with polar and subtropicaljet streams, which are known as areas of high turbulenceprobability, are dist'inguishable on satellite photographs.These high risk

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