Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for :

  • Frontogenesis/frontolysis x
  • Meteorological Monographs x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
David M. Schultz

Abstract

One characteristic of Fred Sanders' research is his ability to take a topic that is believed to be well understood by the research community and show that interesting research problems still exist. Among Sanders' considerable contributions to synoptic meteorology, those concerned with surface cold fronts have been especially influential. After a brief historical review of fronts and frontal analysis, this chapter presents three stages in Sanders' career when he performed research on the structure, dynamics, and analysis of surface cold fronts. First, his 1955 paper, "An investigation of the structure and dynamics of an intense surface frontal zone," was the first study to discuss quantitatively the dynamics of a surface cold front. In the 1960s, Sanders and his students further examined the structure of cold fronts, resulting in the unpublished 1967 report to the National Science Foundation, "Frontal structure and the dynamics of frontogenesis." For a third lime in his career, Sanders published several papers (1995–2005) revisiting the structure and dynamics of cold fronts. His 1967 and 1995–2005 work raises the question of the origin and dynamics of the surface pressure trough and/or wind shift that sometimes precedes the temperature gradient (hereafter called a prefrontal trough or prefrontal wind shift, respectively). Sanders showed that the relationship between this prefrontal feature and the temperature gradient is fundamental to the strength of the front. When the wind shift is coincident with the temperature gradient, frontogenesis (strengthening of the front) results; when the wind shift lies ahead of the temperature gradient, frontolysis (weakening of the front) results. a number of proposed mechanisms for the formation of prefrontal troughs and prefrontal wind shifts exist. Consequently, much research remains to be performed on these topics.

Full access
David M. Schultz
,
Lance F. Bosart
,
Brian A. Colle
,
Huw C. Davies
,
Christopher Dearden
,
Daniel Keyser
,
Olivia Martius
,
Paul J. Roebber
,
W. James Steenburgh
,
Hans Volkert
, and
Andrew C. Winters

, section 4 (written by Martius and Bosart) describes where on Earth cyclones are found (i.e., within midlatitude polar jet streams) and the processes that maintain the jet strength as cyclones repeatedly draw energy from them. Section 5 (written by Winters, Dearden, and Keyser) examines the accoutrements associated with the cyclone, the fronts. This section presents the observations, theory, and diagnosis of fronts and frontogenesis. Section 6 (written by Steenburgh and Dearden) synthesizes the

Full access