Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • Microwave observations x
  • RELAMPAGO-CACTI: High Impact Weather in Subtropical South America x
  • Monthly Weather Review x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All
Zachary S. Bruick
,
Kristen L. Rasmussen
, and
Daniel J. Cecil

Argentina. With time, this will be a promising avenue to explore hail within this region, but currently the data record is not extensive enough for a thorough analysis. Fig . 1. Southern South America with topography shaded and the study area outlined. As a result, the most comprehensive way to examine the climatology of hail in subtropical South America and compare these results to other parts of the world is to use passive microwave satellite observations of ice hydrometeors. These measurements have

Free access
James N. Marquis
,
Zhe Feng
,
Adam Varble
,
T. Connor Nelson
,
Adam Houston
,
John M. Peters
,
Jake P. Mulholland
, and
Joseph Hardin

 al. 2018 ; Bachmann et al. 2020 ; Singh et al. 2022 ; Nelson et al. 2022 ). However, few observational studies exist to verify these findings during real-world CI events. A second fundamental source of CI uncertainty results from the near-cloud environment being poorly represented on a variety of spatiotemporal scales owing to limited routine observations, and inadequate model configuration or initialization techniques (e.g., Wilson and Mueller 1993 ; Weckwerth and Parsons 2006 ; Bodine et

Open access
Russ S. Schumacher
,
Deanna A. Hence
,
Stephen W. Nesbitt
,
Robert J. Trapp
,
Karen A. Kosiba
,
Joshua Wurman
,
Paola Salio
,
Martin Rugna
,
Adam C. Varble
, and
Nathan R. Kelly

1. Introduction Subtropical South America, and in particular the La Plata basin of Argentina, has been identified as a region with some of the most intense convective storms on the planet. In particular, observations from the TRMM satellite have shown that especially deep and wide convective systems occur in this region ( Zipser et al. 2006 ; Romatschke and Houze 2010 ; Liu and Zipser 2015 ; Houze et al. 2015 ), and these storms produce a very large proportion of the annual rainfall for this

Full access
Zhe Feng
,
Adam Varble
,
Joseph Hardin
,
James Marquis
,
Alexis Hunzinger
,
Zhixiao Zhang
, and
Mandana Thieman

relative importance of various factors that impact deep convection initiation (CI) and growth are difficult to examine in observations, partly because factors are correlated and interact across a variety of spatiotemporal scales. In addition, comprehensive observations of near-cloud ambient conditions leading up to CI and subsequent evolution of convection are very limited, owing to the difficulty to target the precise location and timing of CI in a highly heterogeneous mesoscale environment. Several

Open access
Jeremiah O. Piersante
,
Kristen L. Rasmussen
,
Russ S. Schumacher
,
Angela K. Rowe
, and
Lynn A. McMurdie

1. Introduction Thunderstorms maximize in frequency and intensity near large mountain ranges ( Zipser et al. 2006 ); however, ground-based observations are historically sparse in some of these locations around the world. Fortunately, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) has provided a robust dataset of subtropical storm characteristics. Resulting studies using TRMM PR have shown observational evidence that convective echoes east of the Andes Mountains in

Full access
Jake P. Mulholland
,
Stephen W. Nesbitt
,
Robert J. Trapp
,
Kristen L. Rasmussen
, and
Paola V. Salio

1. Introduction Satellite observations have revealed that some of the world’s most intense thunderstorms occur across subtropical South America and, more specifically, in northern and central Argentina (e.g., Zipser et al. 2006 ; Romatschke and Houze 2010 ; Cecil and Blankenship 2012 ; Houze et al. 2015 ). These thunderstorms typically develop near a secondary mountain range to the east of the Andes called the Sierras de Córdoba (SDC), and they have been associated with severe weather

Full access