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Yun Lin, Yuan Wang, Bowen Pan, Jiaxi Hu, Yangang Liu, and Renyi Zhang

Abstract

A continental cloud complex, consisting of shallow cumuli, a deep convective cloud (DCC), and stratus, is simulated by a cloud-resolving Weather Research and Forecasting Model to investigate the aerosol microphysical effect (AME) and aerosol radiative effect (ARE) on the various cloud regimes and their transitions during the Department of Energy Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Aerial Facility Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) campaign. Under an elevated aerosol loading with AME only, a reduced cloudiness for the shallow cumuli and stratus resulted from more droplet evaporation competing with suppressed precipitation, but an enhanced cloudiness for the DCC is attributed to more condensation. With the inclusion of ARE, the shallow cumuli are suppressed owing to the thermodynamic effects of light-absorbing aerosols. The responses of DCC and stratus to aerosols are monotonic with AME only but nonmonotonic with both AME and ARE. The DCC is invigorated because of favorable convection and moisture conditions at night induced by daytime ARE, via the so-called aerosol-enhanced conditional instability mechanism. The results reveal that the overall aerosol effects on the cloud complex are distinct from the individual cloud types, highlighting that the aerosol–cloud interactions for diverse cloud regimes and their transitions need to be evaluated to assess the regional and global climatic impacts.

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Melissa Bowen, Jordan Markham, Philip Sutton, Xuebin Zhang, Quran Wu, Nick T. Shears, and Denise Fernandez

Abstract

This paper investigates the mechanisms causing interannual variability of upper ocean heat content and sea surface temperature (SST) in the southwest Pacific. Using the ECCOv4 ocean reanalysis it is shown that air–sea heat flux and ocean heat transport convergence due to ocean dynamics both contribute to the variability of upper ocean temperatures around New Zealand. The ocean dynamics responsible for the ocean heat transport convergence are investigated. It is shown that SSTs are significantly correlated with the arrival of barotropic Rossby waves estimated from the South Pacific wind stress over the latitudes of New Zealand. Both Argo observations and the ECCOv4 reanalysis show deep isotherms fluctuate coherently around the country. The authors suggest that the depth of the thermocline around New Zealand adjusts to changes in the South Pacific winds, modifies the vertical advection of heat into the upper ocean, and contributes to the interannual variability of SST in the region.

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Xi-Bin Ji, Wen-Zhi Zhao, Er-Si Kang, Zhi-Hui Zhang, Bo-Wen Jin, and Li-Wen Zhao

Abstract

Continuous eddy covariance measurements of CO2, water vapor, and heat fluxes were obtained from a maize field within an oasis in northwest China from 1 May 2008 to 30 April 2009. The experimental setup used was shown to provide reliable flux estimates on the basis of cross-checks made using various quality tests of the flux data. Results show that the highest half-hourly CO2 fluxes (Fc) were −55.7 and 6.9 μmol m−2 s−1 during the growing and nongrowing seasons, respectively. The daily net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) ranged from −14.7 to 2.2 g C m−2 day−1 during the growing season; however, the daily NEE fell to between 0.2 and 2.1 g C m−2 day−1 during the nongrowing season. The annual NEE calculated by integrating flux measurements and filling in missing and spurious data was about −487.9 g C m−2. The total NEE during the growing season (−692.9 g C m−2) and the annual NEE were in the middle of the range, when compared with results obtained for maize fields in different studies and regions, whereas the differences between the off-season NEE from this study (205.0 g C m−2) and those defined in previous studies were very small. In addition, the seasonal variations in energy balance and evapotranspiration over the maize field were also addressed.

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Bowen Pan, Yuan Wang, Jiaxi Hu, Yun Lin, Jen-Shan Hsieh, Timothy Logan, Xidan Feng, Jonathan H. Jiang, Yuk L. Yung, and Renyi Zhang

Abstract

The radiative and microphysical properties of Saharan dust are believed to impact the Atlantic regional climate and tropical cyclones (TCs), but the detailed mechanism remains uncertain. In this study, atmosphere-only simulations are performed from 2002 to 2006 using the Community Atmospheric Model, version 5.1, with and without dust emission from the Sahara Desert. The Saharan dust exhibits noticeable impacts on the regional longwave and shortwave radiation, cloud formation, and the convective systems over West Africa and the tropical Atlantic. The African easterly jet and West African monsoon are modulated by dust, leading to northward shifts of the intertropical convergence zone and the TC genesis region. The dust events induce positive midlevel moisture and entropy deficit anomalies, enhancing the TC genesis. On the other hand, the increased vertical wind shear and decreased low-level vorticity and potential intensity by dust inhibit TC formation in the genesis region. The ventilation index shows a decrease in the intensification region and an increase in the genesis region by dust, corresponding to favorable and unfavorable TC activities, respectively. The comparison of nondust scenarios in 2005 and 2006 shows more favorable TC conditions in 2005 characterized by higher specific humidity and potential intensity, but lower ventilation index, wind shear, and entropy deficit. Those are attributable to the observed warmer sea surface temperature (SST) in 2005, in which dust effects can be embedded. Our results imply significant dust perturbations on the radiative budget, hydrological cycle, and large-scale environments relevant to TC activity over the Atlantic.

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Hanqin Tian, Jia Yang, Chaoqun Lu, Rongting Xu, Josep G. Canadell, Robert B. Jackson, Almut Arneth, Jinfeng Chang, Guangsheng Chen, Philippe Ciais, Stefan Gerber, Akihiko Ito, Yuanyuan Huang, Fortunat Joos, Sebastian Lienert, Palmira Messina, Stefan Olin, Shufen Pan, Changhui Peng, Eri Saikawa, Rona L. Thompson, Nicolas Vuichard, Wilfried Winiwarter, Sönke Zaehle, Bowen Zhang, Kerou Zhang, and Qiuan Zhu

Abstract

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and also an ozone-depleting substance that has both natural and anthropogenic sources. Large estimation uncertainty remains on the magnitude and spatiotemporal patterns of N2O fluxes and the key drivers of N2O production in the terrestrial biosphere. Some terrestrial biosphere models have been evolved to account for nitrogen processes and to show the capability to simulate N2O emissions from land ecosystems at the global scale, but large discrepancies exist among their estimates primarily because of inconsistent input datasets, simulation protocol, and model structure and parameterization schemes. Based on the consistent model input data and simulation protocol, the global N2O Model Intercomparison Project (NMIP) was initialized with 10 state-of-the-art terrestrial biosphere models that include nitrogen (N) cycling. Specific objectives of NMIP are to 1) unravel the major N cycling processes controlling N2O fluxes in each model and identify the uncertainty sources from model structure, input data, and parameters; 2) quantify the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of global and regional N2O fluxes from the preindustrial period (1860) to present and attribute the relative contributions of multiple environmental factors to N2O dynamics; and 3) provide a benchmarking estimate of N2O fluxes through synthesizing the multimodel simulation results and existing estimates from ground-based observations, inventories, and statistical and empirical extrapolations. This study provides detailed descriptions for the NMIP protocol, input data, model structure, and key parameters, along with preliminary simulation results. The global and regional N2O estimation derived from the NMIP is a key component of the global N2O budget synthesis activity jointly led by the Global Carbon Project and the International Nitrogen Initiative.

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