Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 16 items for :

  • Regional effects x
  • Process-Oriented Model Diagnostics x
  • User-accessible content x
Clear All
Zhe Feng, Fengfei Song, Koichi Sakaguchi, and L. Ruby Leung

; Pritchard and Somerville 2009a , b ). Convection-permitting regional models (grid spacing ≤ 4 km) can produce significantly more realistic warm season MCSs comparable to observations ( Feng et al. 2018 ; Prein et al. 2020 ), but they are still prohibitively expensive for long-term climate simulations. Global models with grid spacing finer than 100 km have the potential for substantial improvements at synoptic-scale processes ( Roberts et al. 2018 ), which can result in more intense and less frequent

Open access
Samson M. Hagos, L. Ruby Leung, Oluwayemi A. Garuba, Charlotte Demott, Bryce Harrop, Jian Lu, and Min-Seop Ahn

1. Introduction Understanding and quantifying the effects of global warming on regional hydrological cycles is one of the most important problems in climate science because of the societal implications. At global scale, atmospheric moisture increases with temperature under global warming at a rate that follows the Clausius–Clapeyron relationship of ~7% K −1 , while global precipitation increases at a much slower rate of ~2% K −1 ( Held and Soden 2006 ). This difference between the responses of

Open access
Alexis Berg and Justin Sheffield

; Miralles et al. 2010 ). However, the exact global role of soil evaporation and canopy interception remains uncertain as well. It should be noted that on a regional scale soil evaporation and canopy interception may be significant or even dominant terms. Overall, knowledge of ET partitioning at the global scale remains poorly constrained, beyond the general orders of magnitude of the different terms. In the present study, we focus on investigating the representation of ET partitioning in current

Full access
James F. Booth, Catherine M. Naud, and Jeff Willison

chain of reasoning, the present study examines ETC precipitation and the precipitation generated by the convection scheme in a reanalysis, GCMs, and a regional climate model. The research is focused on determining the skill of the reanalysis and the different models, relative to each other, in generating ETC precipitation and determining if the contribution of precipitation from the convection scheme impacts the relationship between the cyclones and their water vapor content and surface winds. The

Open access
Fiaz Ahmed and J. David Neelin

distinct lower-tropospheric layers. We also define the plume buoyancy B as The traditional formulation of buoyancy is , where and are the plume and environment virtual temperatures, respectively, so our formulation differs from the traditional formulation in its omission of the virtual temperature effects. Using (3) and (8) for and assuming zero mass flux (or influence) at the surface, we get an expression for the buoyancy B in height coordinates: and a similar expression in pressure

Full access
Alexis Berg and Justin Sheffield

that while models, on average, point to consistent regional “hotspots” of significant feedback of soil moisture variability on precipitation, they display large differences in the patterns and amplitude of this feedback ( Koster et al. 2006 ). In addition, although modeling studies generally report a positive relationship between soil moisture, evapotranspiration, and precipitation, some models exhibit little or no coupling ( Lawrence and Slingo 2005 ) or a negative feedback in some regions ( Cook

Full access
Suzana J. Camargo, Claudia F. Giulivi, Adam H. Sobel, Allison A. Wing, Daehyun Kim, Yumin Moon, Jeffrey D. O. Strong, Anthony D. Del Genio, Maxwell Kelley, Hiroyuki Murakami, Kevin A. Reed, Enrico Scoccimarro, Gabriel A. Vecchi, Michael F. Wehner, Colin Zarzycki, and Ming Zhao

provided by Camargo and Wing (2016) . Both TC future projections, as well as the subseasonal and seasonal forecasts, are dependent on the ability of the models to simulate TC climatological characteristics. Various types of bias correction procedures can be applied to the model ouput ( Camargo and Zebiak 2002 ; Camargo and Barnston 2009 ; Camp et al. 2018 ). However, these regional bias corrections cannot be used to obtain an unbiased global TC climatology and could lead to errors in TC projections

Full access
Yi-Hung Kuo, Kathleen A. Schiro, and J. David Neelin

originating from the extratropics ( section S6 ). The observed sharp increase in precipitation as CWV exceeds critical has been explained by entraining plume calculations, through which the deep convective conditional instability can be estimated. As previously demonstrated ( Holloway and Neelin 2009 ; Schiro et al. 2016 ; Kuo et al. 2017 ), CWV serves as a measure of the impact of environment moisture on plume buoyancy, and hence the instability, through the effects of mixing, as indicated by the

Full access
Allison A. Wing, Suzana J. Camargo, Adam H. Sobel, Daehyun Kim, Yumin Moon, Hiroyuki Murakami, Kevin A. Reed, Gabriel A. Vecchi, Michael F. Wehner, Colin Zarzycki, and Ming Zhao

algorithm, which has been widely applied to various global and regional climate models (e.g., Camargo 2013 ). This algorithm uses basin-dependent thresholds of low-level vorticity, surface wind speed, and vertically integrated temperature anomaly to detect TCs, then tracks the low-level vorticity center forward and backward in time from each point that has met the detection criteria. For this study, we additionally require that the vortex have an intensity greater than 15.2 m s −1 for 3 days (not

Full access
Daehyun Kim, Yumin Moon, Suzana J. Camargo, Allison A. Wing, Adam H. Sobel, Hiroyuki Murakami, Gabriel A. Vecchi, Ming Zhao, and Eric Page

in computing power, high-resolution GCMs with grid spacing of 20–50 km have been widely used in research and forecasting (e.g., Roberts et al. 2015 ; Wehner et al. 2017 ). Such higher-resolution global models reproduce the response of TCs to ENSO significantly better than older, lower-resolution GCMs (e.g., Zhang et al. 2016 ), leading to seasonal forecasts of regional (as opposed to only basinwide) TC activity; these forecasts include category 4 and 5 storms (not captured in older global

Open access