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Wei-Chyung Wang, Joseph P. Pinto, and Yuk Ling Yung

Abstract

Using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model, we perform a sensitivity study of the effect of ozone depletion in the stratosphere on the surface temperature. There could be a cooling of the surface temperature by ∼0.2 K due to chlorofluoromethane-induced ozone depletion at steady state (assuming 1973 release rates). This cooling reduces significantly the greenhouse effect due to the presence of chlorofluoromethanes. Carbon tetrafluoride has a strong ν3 band at 7.8 μm, and the atmospheric greenhouse effect is shown to be 0.07 and 0.12 K (ppbv)−1 with and without taking into account overlap with CH4 and N2O bands. At concentration higher than l ppbv, absorption by the ν3 band starts to saturate and the greenhouse effect becomes less efficient.

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Lunche Wang, Wei Gong, Yingying Ma, and Miao Zhang

Abstract

Net primary productivity (NPP) is an important component of the carbon cycle and a key indicator of ecosystem performance. The aim of this study is to construct a more accurate regional vegetation NPP estimation model and explore the relationship between NPP and climatic factors (air temperature, rainfall, sunshine hours, relative humidity, air pressure, global radiation, and surface net radiation). As a key variable in NPP modeling, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was obtained by finding a linear relationship between PAR and horizontal direct radiation, scattered radiation, and net radiation with high accuracy. The fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) was estimated by enhanced vegetation index (EVI) instead of the widely used normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Stress factors of temperature/humidity for different types of vegetation were also considered in the simulation of light use efficiencies (LUE). The authors used EVI datasets of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from 2001 to 2011 and geographic information techniques to reveal NPP variations in Wuhan. Time lagged serial correlation analysis was employed to study the delayed and continuous effects of climatic factors on NPP. The results showed that the authors’ improved model can simulate vegetation NPP in Wuhan effectively, and it may be adopted or used in other regions of the world that need to be further tested. The results indicated that air temperature and air pressure contributed significantly to the interannual changes of plant NPP while rainfall and global radiation were major climatic factors influencing seasonal NPP variations. A significant positive 32-day lagged correlation was observed between seasonal variation of NPP and rainfall (P < 0.01); the influence of changing climate on NPP lasted for 64 days. The impact of air pressure, global radiation, and net radiation on NPP persisted for 48 days, while the effects of sunshine hours and air temperature on NPP only lasted for 16 and 32 days, respectively.

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Wei-Yu Chang, Tai-Chi Chen Wang, and Pay-Liam Lin

Abstract

The drop size distribution (DSD) and drop shape relation (DSR) characteristics that were observed by a ground-based 2D video disdrometer and retrieved from a C-band polarimetric radar in the typhoon systems during landfall in the western Pacific, near northern Taiwan, were analyzed. The evolution of the DSD and its relation with the vertical development of the reflectivity of two rainband cases are fully illustrated. Three different types of precipitation systems were classified—weak stratiform, stratiform, and convective—according to characteristics of the mass-weighted diameter Dm, the maximum diameter, and the vertical structure of reflectivity. Further study of the relationship between the height H of the 15-dBZ contour of the vertical reflectivity profile, surface reflectivity Z, and the mass-weighted diameter Dm showed that Dm increased with a corresponding increase in the system depth H and reflectivity Z.

An analysis of DSDs retrieved from the National Central University (NCU) C-band polarimetric radar and disdrometer in typhoon cases indicates that the DSDs from the typhoon systems on the ocean were mainly a maritime convective type. However, the DSDs collected over land tended to uniquely locate in between the continental and maritime clusters. The average mass-weighted diameter Dm was about 2 mm and the average logarithmic normalized intercept Nw was about 3.8 log10 mm−1 m−3 in typhoon cases. The unique terrain-influenced deep convective systems embedded in typhoons in northern Taiwan might be the reason for these characteristics.

The “effective DSR” of typhoon systems had an axis ratio similar to that found by E. A. Brandes et al. when the raindrops were less than 1.5 mm. Nevertheless, the axis ratio tended to be more spherical with drops greater than 1.5 mm and under higher horizontal winds (maximum wind speed less than 8 m s−1). A fourth-order fitting DSR was derived for typhoon systems and the value was also very close to the estimated DSR from the polarimetric measurements in Typhoon Saomai (2006).

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Michael P. Dudek, Xin-Zhong Liang, and Wei-Chyung Wang

Abstract

The scale dependence of cloud-radiation interaction associated with the parameterizations for fractional cloudiness and radiation used in a global climate model is studied by examining the averages, for different spatial scales, of detailed structure of cloudiness and radiation simulated from a regional climate model that incorporates these parameterizations. The regional model simulation is conducted over an area about (360 km)2 located on the southern Great Plains for the period 10–17 April 1994 during which both satellite and surface measurements of radiation fluxes and clouds are available from the Intensive Observing Period of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. The area corresponds approximately to one gridpoint size of a global climate model with horizontal resolution T31.

The regional model simulates well the overall cloud and radiation temporal features when averaged over the entire region. However, specific biases exist in the spatial patterns such as the high clouds, the TOA upwelling solar radiation under cloudy conditions, and the net longwave surface flux under clear conditions at night. The cloud and radiation parameterizations are found to be sensitive to the spatial scale of the computation. The diagnosed total cloudiness shows a strong horizontal resolution dependence that leads to large changes in the surface and TOA radiation budgets. An additional experiment, in which the diagnosed cloud at each level is held constant while the radiation parameterization is recalculated, still produces a substantial sensitivity to spatial scale in the calculated radiation quantities. This is because the nature of the cloud vertical overlapping assumption changes as the horizontal scale of the computation varies.

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David A. Portman, Wei-Chyung Wang, and Thomas R. Karl

Abstract

Validation of general circulation model (GCM) current climate simulations is important for further GCM development and application to climate change studies. So far, studies that compare GCM output with observations have focused primarily on large-scale spatial averages of the surface climate variables. Here we discuss two approaches to compare output of individual GCM grid boxes with local station observations near the surface and in the free troposphere. The first approach, proposed by Chervin, involves the application of standard parametric statistical analysis and hypothesis testing procedures. The second approach is nonparametric in the sense that no ideal distributions are postulated a priori to ascertain significance of the difference of mean temperature or the ratio of the temperature variance between model grid boxes and local stations. Instead, station observations are first subjected to a bootstrap technique and then used to define a unique set of distributions and confidence limits for each GCM grid box.

To demonstrate the usefulness of the two approaches, we compare daily and seasonal gridbox temperatures simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM1) with station temperatures at the surface, 850-mb, 500-mb, and 300-mb levels for three different areas in the United States. We find that although CCM1 gridbox temperatures are mostly cooler than station temperatures, they are equally variable. For all grid boxes, gridbox-to-station differences decrease with height and vary with time of year. We conclude that the techniques presented here can provide useful comparisons of GCM regional and local observed temperatures. Application to other variables and GCMs is also discussed.

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Chia-Chi Wang, Chia Chou, and Wei-Liang Lee

Abstract

The effects of moisture on the intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) over the eastern Pacific on the synoptic time scale are investigated using an intermediate complexity atmospheric circulation model, the quasi-equilibrium tropical circulation model (QTCM1), on an aquaplanet.

The dry simulation shows results consistent with those of simple dynamic models, except that a slightly stronger heating rate is needed owing to different model designs. In the moist simulations, the most important result is the formation of a tail southwest of a vortex during and after the ITCZ breakdown. This tail may extend zonally more than 60° longitude and last for more than two weeks in an idealized simulation. In the eastern North Pacific, this phenomenon is often observed in cases that involve easterly waves. In a sense, the formation of the tail suggests a possible mechanism that forms an ITCZ efficiently.

This study shows that the surface convergent flow induced by a disturbance initializes a positive wind–evaporation feedback that forms the tail. In the tail, the most important energy source is surface evaporation, and the latent heat is nicely balanced by an adiabatic cooling of the ascending motion. In other words, the energy is redistributed vertically by vertical energy convergence.

The lifespan of the tail is controlled by the propagation of tropical waves that modify the surface wind pattern, leading to a decrease in surface wind speed and corresponding surface fluxes. It may explain the absence of the tail in some of the events in the real atmosphere.

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Youbing Peng, Caiming Shen, Wei-Chyung Wang, and Ying Xu

Abstract

Studies of the effects of large volcanic eruptions on regional climate so far have focused mostly on temperature responses. Previous studies using proxy data suggested that coherent droughts over eastern China are associated with explosive low-latitude volcanic eruptions. Here, the authors present an investigation of the responses of summer precipitation over eastern China to large volcanic eruptions through analyzing a 1000-yr global climate model simulation driven by natural and anthropogenic forcing. Superposed epoch analyses of 18 cases of large volcanic eruption indicate that summer precipitation over eastern China significantly decreases in the eruption year and the year after. Model simulation suggests that this reduction of summer precipitation over eastern China can be attributed to a weakening of summer monsoon and a decrease of moisture vapor over tropical oceans caused by large volcanic eruptions.

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Chuan Jiang Huang, Wei Wang, and Rui Xin Huang

Abstract

The circulation in the equatorial Pacific Ocean is studied in a series of numerical experiments based on an isopycnal coordinate model. The model is subject to monthly mean climatology of wind stress and surface thermohaline forcing. In response to decadal variability in the diapycnal mixing coefficient, sea surface temperature and other properties of the circulation system oscillate periodically. The strongest sea surface temperature anomaly appears in the geographic location of Niño-3 region with the amplitude on the order of 0.5°C, if the model is subject to a 30-yr sinusoidal oscillation in diapycnal mixing coefficient that varies between 0.03 × 10−4 and 0.27 × 10−4 m2 s−1. Changes in diapycnal mixing coefficient of this amplitude are within the bulk range consistent with the external mechanical energy input in the global ocean, especially when considering the great changes of tropical cyclones during the past decades. Thus, time-varying diapycnal mixing associated with changes in wind energy input into the ocean may play a nonnegligible role in decadal climate variability in the equatorial circulation and climate.

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Yaru Guo, Yuanlong Li, Fan Wang, Yuntao Wei, and Zengrui Rong

Abstract

A high-resolution (3–8 km) regional oceanic general circulation model is utilized to understand the sea surface temperature (SST) variability of Ningaloo Niño in the southeast Indian Ocean (SEIO). The model reproduces eight Ningaloo Niño events with good fidelity and reveals complicated spatial structures. Mesoscale noises are seen in the warming signature and confirmed by satellite microwave SST data. Model experiments are carried out to quantitatively evaluate the effects of key processes. The results reveal that the surface turbulent heat flux (primarily latent heat flux) is the most important process (contribution > 68%) in driving and damping the SST warming for most events, while the roles of the Indonesian Throughflow (~15%) and local wind forcing are secondary. A suitable air temperature warming is essential to reproducing the reduced surface latent heat loss during the growth of SST warming (~66%), whereas the effect of the increased air humidity is negligibly small (1%). The established SST warming in the mature phase causes increased latent heat loss that initiates the decay of warming. A 20-member ensemble simulation is performed for the 2010/11 super Ningaloo Niño, which confirms the strong influence of ocean internal processes in the redistribution of SST warming signatures. Oceanic eddies can dramatically modulate the magnitudes of local SST warming, particularly in offshore areas where the “signal-to-noise” ratio is low, raising a caution for evaluating the predictability of Ningaloo Niño and its environmental consequences.

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Wei Wang, Ying-Hwa Kuo, and Thomas T. Warner

Abstract

An analysis of a diabatically driven and long-lived midtropospheric vortex in the lee of the Tibetan Plateau during 24–27 June 1987 is presented. The large-scale conditions were characterized by the westward expansion of the 500-mb western Pacific subtropical high and the amplification of a trough in the lee of the plateau. Embedded within the lee trough, three mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) developed. A vortex emerged following the dissipation of one MCS, with its strongest circulation located in the 400–500-mb layer. Low-level warm advection, and surface sensible and latent heating contributed to the convective initiation. Weak wind and weak ambient vorticity conditions inside the lee trough provided a favorable environment for these MCSs and the vortex to develop and evolve. The organized vortex circulation featured a coherent core of cyclonic vorticity extending from near the surface to 300 mb, with virtually no vertical tilt. The air in the vicinity of the vortex was very moist, and the temperature profile was nearly moist adiabatic, with moderate convective available potential energy. The wind near the vortex center was weak, with little vertical shear. These characteristics are similar to those of mesoscale convectively generated vortices found in the United States. The vortex circulation persisted in the same area for 3 days. The steadiness of large-scale circulation in the region, that is, the presence of the stationary lee trough and a geopotential ridge that developed to the east of the trough, likely contributed to the persistence of the vortex over the same area.

Potential vorticity (PV) diagnosis suggests that the significant increase in the relative vorticity associated with the vortex development was largely a result of diabatic heating associated with the MCS. An elevated PV anomaly was found near 400 mb in situ after the dissipation of the MCS. The PV anomaly was distinctly separated from those associated with baroclinic disturbances located to the north of the Tibetan Plateau, and the region of the PV anomaly was nearly saturated (with relative humidity exceeding 80%). Further support for this hypothesis was provided by the estimated heating profile and the rate of PV generation due to diabatic heating. The heating peaked at 300 mb, while the diabatic generation of PV reached its maximum at 500 mb. The preexisting ambient vorticity contributed about 20% to the total PV generation near the mature stage of the MCS.

The vortex was also associated with heavy precipitation over the western Sichuan Basin of China. The persistent, heavy rainfall took place in the southeasterly flow associated with the vortex circulation, about 300 km north of the vortex center.

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