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  • Author or Editor: Christopher D. Barnet x
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Eric S. Maddy
,
Thomas S. King
,
Haibing Sun
,
Walter W. Wolf
,
Christopher D. Barnet
,
Andrew Heidinger
,
Zhaohui Cheng
,
Mitchell D. Goldberg
,
Antonia Gambacorta
,
Chen Zhang
, and
Kexin Zhang

Abstract

High spatial resolution measurements from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the Meteorological Operation (MetOp)-A satellite that are collocated to the footprints from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) on the satellite are exploited to improve and quality control cloud-cleared radiances obtained from the IASI. For a partial set of mostly ocean MetOp-A orbits collected on 3 October 2010 for latitudes between 70°S and 75°N, these cloud-cleared radiances and clear-sky subpixel AVHRR measurements within the IASI footprint agree to better than 0.25-K root-mean-squared difference for AVHRR window channels with almost zero bias. For the same dataset, surface skin temperatures retrieved using the combined AVHRR, IASI, and Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) cloud-clearing algorithm match well with ECMWF model surface skin temperatures over ocean, yielding total uncertainties ≤1.2 K for scenes with up to 97% cloudiness.

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Nicholas R. Nalli
,
Christopher D. Barnet
,
Tony Reale
,
Quanhua Liu
,
Vernon R. Morris
,
J. Ryan Spackman
,
Everette Joseph
,
Changyi Tan
,
Bomin Sun
,
Frank Tilley
,
L. Ruby Leung
, and
Daniel Wolfe

Abstract

This paper examines the performance of satellite sounder atmospheric vertical moisture profiles under tropospheric conditions encompassing moisture contrasts driven by convection and advection transport mechanisms, specifically Atlantic Ocean Saharan air layers (SALs), tropical Hadley cells, and Pacific Ocean atmospheric rivers (ARs). Operational satellite sounder moisture profile retrievals from the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP) NOAA Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) are empirically assessed using collocated dedicated radiosonde observations (raobs) obtained from ocean-based intensive field campaigns. The raobs from these campaigns provide uniquely independent correlative truth data not assimilated into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models for satellite sounder validation over oceans. Although ocean cases are often considered “easy” by the satellite remote sensing community, these hydrometeorological phenomena present challenges to passive sounders, including vertical gradient discontinuities (e.g., strong inversions), as well as persistent uniform clouds, aerosols, and precipitation. It is found that the operational satellite sounder 100-layer moisture profile NUCAPS product performs close to global uncertainty requirements in the SAL/Hadley cell environment, with biases relative to raob within 10% up to 350 hPa. In the more difficult AR environment, bias relative to raob is found to be within 20% up to 400 hPa. In both environments, the sounder moisture retrievals are comparable to NWP model outputs, and cross-sectional analyses show the capability of the satellite sounder for detecting and resolving these tropospheric moisture features, thereby demonstrating a near-real-time forecast utility over these otherwise raob-sparse regions.

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Hua Xie
,
Nicholas R. Nalli
,
Shanna Sampson
,
Walter W. Wolf
,
Jun Li
,
Timothy J. Schmit
,
Christopher D. Barnet
,
Everette Joseph
,
Vernon R. Morris
, and
Fanglin Yang

Abstract

An ocean-based prelaunch evaluation of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-R series Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) legacy atmospheric profile (LAP) products is conducted using proxy data based upon the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board the Meteosat Second Generation satellite. SEVIRI-based LAP temperature and moisture profile retrievals are validated against in situ correlative data obtained over the open ocean from multiple years of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Aerosols and Ocean Science Expeditions (AEROSE). The NOAA AEROSE data include dedicated radiosonde observations (RAOBs) launched from the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown over the tropical Atlantic: a region optimally situated within the full-disk scanning range of SEVIRI and one of great meteorological importance as the main development area of Atlantic hurricanes. The most recent versions of the GOES-R Algorithm Working Group team algorithms (e.g., cloud mask, aerosol detection products, and LAP) implemented within the algorithms integration team framework (the NOAA operational system that will host these operational product algorithms) are used in the analyses. Forecasts from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecasting System (NCEP GFS) are used for the LAP regression and direct comparisons. The GOES-R LAP retrievals are found to agree reasonably with the AEROSE RAOB observations, and overall retrievals improve both temperature and moisture against computer model NCEP GFS outputs. The validation results are then interpreted within the context of a difficult meteorological regime (e.g., Saharan air layers and dust) coupled with the difficulty of using a narrowband imager for the purpose of atmospheric sounding.

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Nicholas R. Nalli
,
Everette Joseph
,
Vernon R. Morris
,
Christopher D. Barnet
,
Walter W. Wolf
,
Daniel Wolfe
,
Peter J. Minnett
,
Malgorzata Szczodrak
,
Miguel A. Izaguirre
,
Rick Lumpkin
,
Hua Xie
,
Alexander Smirnov
,
Thomas S. King
, and
Jennifer Wei

This paper gives an overview of a unique set of ship-based atmospheric data acquired over the tropical Atlantic Ocean during boreal spring and summer as part of ongoing National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Aerosols and Ocean Science Expedition (AEROSE) field campaigns. Following the original 2004 campaign onboard the Ronald H. Brown, AEROSE has operated on a yearly basis since 2006 in collaboration with the NOAA Prediction and Research Moored Array in the Tropical Atlantic (PIRATA) Northeast Extension (PNE). In this work, attention is given to atmospheric soundings of ozone, temperature, water vapor, pressure, and wind obtained from ozonesondes and radiosondes launched to coincide with low earth orbit environmental satellite overpasses [MetOp and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) A-Train]. Data from the PNE/ AEROSE campaigns are unique in their range of marine meteorological phenomena germane to the satellite missions in question, including dust and smoke outflows from Africa, the Saharan air layer (SAL), and the distribution of tropical water vapor and tropical Atlantic ozone. The multiyear PNE/AEROSE sounding data are valuable as correlative data for prelaunch phase validation of the planned Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and NOAA Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellite R series (GOES-R) systems, as well as numerous other science applications. A brief summary of these data, along with an overview of some important science highlights, including meteorological phenomena of general interest, is presented.

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Randall M. Dole
,
J. Ryan Spackman
,
Matthew Newman
,
Gilbert P. Compo
,
Catherine A. Smith
,
Leslie M. Hartten
,
Joseph J. Barsugli
,
Robert S. Webb
,
Martin P. Hoerling
,
Robert Cifelli
,
Klaus Wolter
,
Christopher D. Barnet
,
Maria Gehne
,
Ronald Gelaro
,
George N. Kiladis
,
Scott Abbott
,
Elena Akish
,
John Albers
,
John M. Brown
,
Christopher J. Cox
,
Lisa Darby
,
Gijs de Boer
,
Barbara DeLuisi
,
Juliana Dias
,
Jason Dunion
,
Jon Eischeid
,
Christopher Fairall
,
Antonia Gambacorta
,
Brian K. Gorton
,
Andrew Hoell
,
Janet Intrieri
,
Darren Jackson
,
Paul E. Johnston
,
Richard Lataitis
,
Kelly M. Mahoney
,
Katherine McCaffrey
,
H. Alex McColl
,
Michael J. Mueller
,
Donald Murray
,
Paul J. Neiman
,
William Otto
,
Ola Persson
,
Xiao-Wei Quan
,
Imtiaz Rangwala
,
Andrea J. Ray
,
David Reynolds
,
Emily Riley Dellaripa
,
Karen Rosenlof
,
Naoko Sakaeda
,
Prashant D. Sardeshmukh
,
Laura C. Slivinski
,
Lesley Smith
,
Amy Solomon
,
Dustin Swales
,
Stefan Tulich
,
Allen White
,
Gary Wick
,
Matthew G. Winterkorn
,
Daniel E. Wolfe
, and
Robert Zamora

Abstract

Forecasts by mid-2015 for a strong El Niño during winter 2015/16 presented an exceptional scientific opportunity to accelerate advances in understanding and predictions of an extreme climate event and its impacts while the event was ongoing. Seizing this opportunity, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) initiated an El Niño Rapid Response (ENRR), conducting the first field campaign to obtain intensive atmospheric observations over the tropical Pacific during El Niño.

The overarching ENRR goal was to determine the atmospheric response to El Niño and the implications for predicting extratropical storms and U.S. West Coast rainfall. The field campaign observations extended from the central tropical Pacific to the West Coast, with a primary focus on the initial tropical atmospheric response that links El Niño to its global impacts. NOAA deployed its Gulfstream-IV (G-IV) aircraft to obtain observations around organized tropical convection and poleward convective outflow near the heart of El Niño. Additional tropical Pacific observations were obtained by radiosondes launched from Kiritimati , Kiribati, and the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown, and in the eastern North Pacific by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Global Hawk unmanned aerial system. These observations were all transmitted in real time for use in operational prediction models. An X-band radar installed in Santa Clara, California, helped characterize precipitation distributions. This suite supported an end-to-end capability extending from tropical Pacific processes to West Coast impacts. The ENRR observations were used during the event in operational predictions. They now provide an unprecedented dataset for further research to improve understanding and predictions of El Niño and its impacts.

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