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Giovanni Martucci
,
Conor Milroy
, and
Colin D. O’Dowd

Abstract

Twelve case studies of multilayer cloud-base height (CBH) retrievals from two collocated ceilometers (Vaisala CL31 and Jenoptik CHM15K) have been analyzed. The studies were performed during the period from September to December 2008 at the Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station in Ireland. During the period of measurement, the two instruments provided vertical profiles of backscattered laser signal as well as the manufacturer’s operational cloud-base product. The cases selected covered a diverse range of cloud-cover conditions, ranging from single to multiple cloud layers and from cloud-base heights varying from only a few hundreds meters per day up to 3–5 km in a few hours. The results show significant offsets between the two manufacturer-derived CBHs along with a considerable degree of scatter. Using a newly developed temporal height-tracking (THT) algorithm applied to both ceilometers, significant improvement in the correlation between CBH derived from both instruments results in a correlation coefficient increasing to R 2 = 0.997 (with a slope of 0.998) from R 2 = 0.788 (with an associated slope of 0.925). Also, the regression intercept (offset) is reduced from 160 m to effectively zero (−3 m). For the worst individual case study, using the THT algorithm resulted in the correlation coefficient improving from R 2 = 0.52, using the manufacturer’s output, to R 2 = 0.97 with a reduction in the offset reducing from 569 to 32 m. Applying the THT algorithm to the backscatter profiles of both instruments led to retrieved cloud bases that are statistically consistent with each other and ensured reliable detection of CBH, particularly when inhomogeneous cloud fields were present and changing rapidly in time. The THT algorithm also overcomes multiple false cloud-base detections associated with the manufacturer’s output of the two instruments.

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Primary Marine Aerosol Fluxes

Progress and Priorities

Ian M. Brooks
,
Edgar L Andreas
,
Gordon McFiggans
,
Magdalena D. Anguelova
, and
Colin O'Dowd

No Abstract available.

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Peter V. Hobbs
,
Timothy J. Garrett
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Scott R. Strader
,
Dean A. Hegg
,
Glendon M. Frick
,
William A. Hoppel
,
Richard F. Gasparovic
,
Lynn M. Russell
,
Douglas W. Johnson
,
Colin O’Dowd
,
Philip A. Durkee
,
Kurt E. Nielsen
, and
George Innis

Abstract

Emissions of particles, gases, heat, and water vapor from ships are discussed with respect to their potential for changing the microstructure of marine stratiform clouds and producing the phenomenon known as “ship tracks.” Airborne measurements are used to derive emission factors of SO2 and NO from diesel-powered and steam turbine-powered ships, burning low-grade marine fuel oil (MFO); they were ∼15–89 and ∼2–25 g kg−1 of fuel burned, respectively. By contrast a steam turbine–powered ship burning high-grade navy distillate fuel had an SO2 emission factor of ∼6 g kg−1.

Various types of ships, burning both MFO and navy distillate fuel, emitted from ∼4 × 1015 to 2 × 1016 total particles per kilogram of fuel burned (∼4 × 1015–1.5 × 1016 particles per second). However, diesel-powered ships burning MFO emitted particles with a larger mode radius (∼0.03–0.05 μm) and larger maximum sizes than those powered by steam turbines burning navy distillate fuel (mode radius ∼0.02 μm). Consequently, if the particles have similar chemical compositions, those emitted by diesel ships burning MFO will serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) at lower supersaturations (and will therefore be more likely to produce ship tracks) than the particles emitted by steam turbine ships burning distillate fuel. Since steam turbine–powered ships fueled by MFO emit particles with a mode radius similar to that of diesel-powered ships fueled by MFO, it appears that, for given ambient conditions, the type of fuel burned by a ship is more important than the type of ship engine in determining whether or not a ship will produce a ship track. However, more measurements are needed to test this hypothesis.

The particles emitted from ships appear to be primarily organics, possibly combined with sulfuric acid produced by gas-to-particle conversion of SO2. Comparison of model results with measurements in ship tracks suggests that the particles from ships contain only about 10% water-soluble materials. Measurements of the total particles entering marine stratiform clouds from diesel-powered ships fueled by MFO, and increases in droplet concentrations produced by these particles, show that only about 12% of the particles serve as CCN.

The fluxes of heat and water vapor from ships are estimated to be ∼2–22 MW and ∼0.5–1.5 kg s−1, respectively. These emissions rarely produced measurable temperature perturbations, and never produced detectable perturbations in water vapor, in the plumes from ships. Nuclear-powered ships, which emit heat but negligible particles, do not produce ship tracks. Therefore, it is concluded that heat and water vapor emissions do not play a significant role in ship track formation and that particle emissions, particularly from those burning low-grade fuel oil, are responsible for ship track formation. Subsequent papers in this special issue discuss and test these hypotheses.

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Kevin J. Noone
,
Elisabeth Öström
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Tim Garrett
,
Peter V. Hobbs
,
Doug W. Johnson
,
Jonathan P. Taylor
,
Lynn M. Russell
,
Richard C. Flagan
,
John H. Seinfeld
,
Colin D. O’Dowd
,
Michael H. Smith
,
Philip A. Durkee
,
Kurt Nielsen
,
James G. Hudson
,
Robert A. Pockalny
,
Lieve De Bock
,
René E. Van Grieken
,
Richard F. Gasparovic
, and
Ian Brooks

Abstract

The effects of anthropogenic particulate emissions from ships on the radiative, microphysical, and chemical properties of moderately polluted marine stratiform clouds are examined. A case study of two ships in the same air mass is presented where one of the vessels caused a discernible ship track while the other did not. In situ measurements of cloud droplet size distributions, liquid water content, and cloud radiative properties, as well as aerosol size distributions (outside cloud, interstitial, and cloud droplet residual particles) and aerosol chemistry, are presented. These are related to measurements of cloud radiative properties. The differences between the aerosol in the two ship plumes are discussed;these indicate that combustion-derived particles in the size range of about 0.03–0.3-μm radius were those that caused the microphysical changes in the clouds that were responsible for the ship track.

The authors examine the processes behind ship track formation in a moderately polluted marine boundary layer as an example of the effects that anthropogenic particulate pollution can have in the albedo of marine stratiform clouds.

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Kevin J. Noone
,
Doug W. Johnson
,
Jonathan P. Taylor
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Tim Garrett
,
Peter V. Hobbs
,
Philip A. Durkee
,
Kurt Nielsen
,
Elisabeth Öström
,
Colin O’Dowd
,
Michael H. Smith
,
Lynn M. Russell
,
Richard C. Flagan
,
John H. Seinfeld
,
Lieve De Bock
,
René E. Van Grieken
,
James G. Hudson
,
Ian Brooks
,
Richard F. Gasparovic
, and
Robert A. Pockalny

Abstract

A case study of the effects of ship emissions on the microphysical, radiative, and chemical properties of polluted marine boundary layer clouds is presented. Two ship tracks are discussed in detail. In situ measurements of cloud drop size distributions, liquid water content, and cloud radiative properties, as well as aerosol size distributions (outside-cloud, interstitial, and cloud droplet residual particles) and aerosol chemistry, are presented. These are related to remotely sensed measurements of cloud radiative properties.

The authors examine the processes behind ship track formation in a polluted marine boundary layer as an example of the effects of anthropogenic particulate pollution on the albedo of marine stratiform clouds.

Full access