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Eric Rogers and Lance F. Bosart

Abstract

A diagnostic study of two intense oceanic cyclones (16–18 November 1972 and 9–11 January 1982) along the east coast of North America is presented. Both cyclones formed along a strong low-level baroclinic zone and deepened in response to an approaching tropospheric short-wave trough aloft.

The 16–18 November 1972 storm developed along a Carolina coastal front in a region of enhanced low-level convergence and cyclonic vorticity generation favorable for incipient cyclogenesis. Significant oceanic heat and moisture fluxes northeast of the cyclone helped to enhance the low-level baroclinicity and to destabilize the warm, moist air mass along the cyclones’ path. Explosive deepening [35 mb(12 h)−1] commenced when a rather ordinary midtropospheric trough was about 300 km upstream of the surface low. A noteworthy aspect of the storm was the existence of deep convection near the center throughout the deepening phase and the exceptionally tight inner pressure gradient, suggestive of the role of diabatic process in the extreme development.

The 9–11 January 1982 cyclone formed and deepened in response to a vigorous mid- and upper-tropospheric trough/jet-streak system of greater intensity and large-scale baroclinicity than seen for the November 1972 cyclone. Oceanic heat fluxes were small except in the cyclones' wake. No widespread areas of convection and convective instability were observed as the cyclone explosively deepened. The 1982 storm achieved peak intensity over cold water while the 1972 storm reached maximum strength over the warm waters of the Gulf Stream. Upper-level frontogenesis may have contributed to the intensity of the upper-tropospheric trough and ensuing downstream development in the 1982 case.

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Eric Rogers and Lance F. Bosart

Abstract

The explosively deepening oceanic cyclone or “bomb,” one which has central pressure falls of 12 mb (12 h)−1 or greater, has been studied using composites constructed from North Atlantic and Pacific weather ship rawinsonde data during the period October 1965 to May 1974, June through September excluded.

The composites revealed that the oceanic bomb evolved in a low-level baroclinic environment where the incipient circulation was confined to the lower troposphere. The cyclone subsequently developed into a deep vortex characterized by strong baroclinicity, strong low and midlevel ascent to the north and east of the cyclone, and lower tropospheric conditional instability found near and to the southeast of the cyclone center. A case study of a very intense cyclone that passed near ship 4YP revealed deep layers of conditional instability near the low center. It appears that explosively deepening cyclones are baroclinic phenomena whose development may be enhanced in some cases by the bulk effects of cumulus convention.

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Eric Rogers, Dennis G. Deaven, and Geoffrey S. Dimego

Abstract

The analysis component of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) operational “early” 80-km eta model, as implemented in July 1993, is described. This optimum interpolation (OI) analysis is fully multivariate for wind and geopotential height (univariate for specific humidity) and is performed directly on the eta model's vertical coordinate. Although the eta OI analysis and model performance has been generally favorable when compared to the Limited-Area Fine Mesh Model (LFM) and the Nested Grid Model (NGM), deficiencies in the eta OI analysis fields have been observed, especially near the surface.

A series of improvements to the eta OI analysis is described. A refinement to the eta model orography, which created a more realistic depiction of the model terrain, is also discussed along with the impact of these changes on analysis and model performance. These changes were implemented in the early eta system in September 1994.

The operational configuration of the new mesoscale (29 km) eta model system is introduced, consisting of a mesoscale eta-based data assimilation system (EDAS) and the mesoscalee forecast. An example of an analysis produced by the mesoscale EDAS is presented for comparison with the operational 80-km eta OI analysis. A brief description of more recent changes to the early eta system are also described.

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Wan-Shu Wu, David F. Parrish, Eric Rogers, and Ying Lin

Abstract

At the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, the global ensemble forecasts from the ensemble Kalman filter scheme in the Global Forecast System are applied in a regional three-dimensional (3D) and a four dimensional (4D) ensemble–variational (EnVar) data assimilation system. The application is a one-way variational method using hybrid static and ensemble error covariances. To enhance impact, three new features have been added to the existing EnVar system in the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). First, the constant coefficients that assign relative weight between the ensemble and static background error are now allowed to vary in the vertical. Second, a new formulation is introduced for the ensemble contribution to the analysis surface pressure. Finally, in order to make use of the information in the ensemble mean that is disregarded in the existing EnVar in GSI, the trajectory correction, a novel approach, is introduced. Relative to the application of a 3D variational data assimilation algorithm, a clear positive impact on 1–3-day forecasts is realized when applying 3DEnVar analyses in the North American Mesoscale Forecast System (NAM). The 3DEnVar DA system was operationally implemented in the NAM Data Assimilation System in August 2014. Application of a 4DEnVar algorithm is shown to further improve forecast accuracy relative to the 3DEnVar. The approach described in this paper effectively combines contributions from both the regional and the global forecast systems to produce the initial conditions for the regional NAM system.

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Jean Thiébaux, Eric Rogers, Wanqiu Wang, and Bert Katz

A new blended high-resolution real-time global sea surface temperature analysis (RTG_SST), developed specifically for use in operational numerical weather forecasting models, was implemented in NCEP's operational job stream on 30 January 2001, immediately following investigations of miss-forecast precipitation events in the mid-Atlantic states. Each daily analysis uses the most recent 24-h receipts of in situ and satellite-derived surface temperature data and provides a global SST field on a 0.5° × 0.5° (latitude-longitude) grid. The RTG_SST provides the sea surface temperature fields for the regional Meso Eta Model, replacing the previously used National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) 50-km satellite-only SST analysis.

Forecast events leading to the implementation of the RTG_SST are described; comparison is made of the properties used in this new analysis with those of the Reynolds-Smith (RS) analysis and the NESDIS 50-km analysis; data ingestion, analysis, and verification components of the RTG_SST are reviewed; and analysis-related products and data that are available via the NCEP Web site are referenced.

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Kingtse C. Mo, Eric Rogers, Wesley Ebisuzaki, R. Wayne Higgins, J. Woollen, and M. L. Carrera

Abstract

During the 2004 North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) field campaign, an extensive set of enhanced atmospheric soundings was gathered over the southwest United States and Mexico. Most of these soundings were assimilated into the NCEP operational global and regional data assimilation systems in real time. This presents a unique opportunity to carry out a series of data assimilation experiments to examine their influence on the NCEP analyses and short-range forecasts. To quantify these impacts, several data-withholding experiments were carried out using the global Climate Data Assimilation System (CDAS), the Regional Climate Data Assimilation System (RCDAS), and the three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3DVAR) Eta Model Data Assimilation System (EDAS) for the NAME 2004 enhanced observation period (EOP).

The impacts of soundings vary between the assimilation systems examined in this study. Overall, the influence of the enhanced soundings is concentrated over the core monsoon area. While differences at upper levels are small, the differences at lower levels are more substantial. The coarse-resolution CDAS does not properly resolve the Gulf of California (GoC), so the assimilation system is not able to exploit the additional soundings to improve characteristics of the Gulf of California low-level jet (GCLLJ) and the associated moisture transport in the GoC region. In contrast, the GCLLJ produced by RCDAS is conspicuously stronger than the observations, though the problem is somewhat alleviated with additional special NAME soundings. For EDAS, soundings improve the intensity and position of the Great Plains low-level jet (GPLLJ). The soundings in general improve the analyses over the areas where the assimilation system has the largest uncertainties and errors. However, the differences in regional analyses owing to the soundings are smaller than the differences between the two regional data assimilation systems.

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David J. Stensrud, Harold E. Brooks, Jun Du, M. Steven Tracton, and Eric Rogers
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Dusanka Zupanski, Milija Zupanski, Eric Rogers, David F. Parrish, and Geoffrey J. DiMego

Abstract

The National Centers for Environmental Prediction fine-resolution four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system is used to study the Great Plains tornado outbreak of 3 May 1999. It was found that the 4DVAR method was able to capture very well the important precursors for the tornadic activity, such as upper- and low-level jet streaks, wind shear, humidity field, surface CAPE, and so on. It was also demonstrated that, in this particular synoptic case, characterized by fast-changing mesoscale systems, the model error adjustment played a substantial role. The experimental results suggest that the common practice of neglecting the model error in data assimilation systems may not be justified in synoptic situations similar to this one.

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David J. Stensrud, Geoffrey S. Manikin, Eric Rogers, and Kenneth E. Mitchell

Abstract

The cold pool, a pool of evaporatively cooled downdraft air that spreads out horizontally along the ground beneath a precipitating cloud, is often a factor in severe weather and heavy precipitation events. Unfortunately, cold pools are not well sampled by the present observational network and are rarely depicted in numerical model initial conditions. A procedure to identify and insert cold pools into the 29-km Eta Model is developed and tested on seven cases during 1995. Results suggest that when the large-scale forcing is strong, the inclusion of cold pools produces only slight changes in the forecasts. However, for the one case in which the large-scale forcing is relatively weak, the inclusion of cold pools produces significant changes in many of the model fields. These initial results, while not conclusive, suggest that the incorporation of cold pools, and other mesoscale features, may be important to the improvement of numerical guidance for severe weather and heavy precipitation forecasting.

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Eric W. Uhlhorn, Bradley W. Klotz, Tomislava Vukicevic, Paul D. Reasor, and Robert F. Rogers

Abstract

Wavenumber-1 wind speed asymmetries in 35 hurricanes are quantified in terms of their amplitude and phase, based on aircraft observations from 128 individual flights between 1998 and 2011. The impacts of motion and 850–200-mb environmental vertical shear are examined separately to estimate the resulting asymmetric structures at the sea surface and standard 700-mb reconnaissance flight level. The surface asymmetry amplitude is on average around 50% smaller than found at flight level, and while the asymmetry amplitude grows in proportion to storm translation speed at the flight level, no significant growth at the surface is observed, contrary to conventional assumption. However, a significant upwind storm-motion-relative phase rotation is found at the surface as translation speed increases, while the flight-level phase remains fairly constant. After removing the estimated impact of storm motion on the asymmetry, a significant residual shear direction-relative asymmetry is found, particularly at the surface, and, on average, is located downshear to the left of shear. Furthermore, the shear-relative phase has a significant downwind rotation as shear magnitude increases, such that the maximum rotates from the downshear to left-of-shear azimuthal location. By stratifying observations according to shear-relative motion, this general pattern of a left-of-shear residual wind speed maximum is found regardless of the orientation between the storm’s heading and shear direction. These results are quite consistent with recent observational studies relating western Pacific typhoon wind asymmetries to environmental shear. Finally, changes in wind asymmetry over a 5-day period during Hurricane Earl (2010) are analyzed to understand the combined impacts of motion and the evolving shear.

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