Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Harold P. Gerrish x
  • Refine by Access: Content accessible to me x
Clear All Modify Search
Harold P. Gerrish

Abstract

Hourly frequency distributions of range-corrected PPI arid multi-level CAPPI radar weather echoes during July 1968 are used to model the summer convective regime in South Florida. The month of July is chosen as being a typical summer month with minimum contamination from frontal penetrations, easterly waves and the like. The resulting convection, therefore, is largely governed by the trade-wind flow and its interaction with the sea-breeze regime. The distributions reveal preferred north-south, quasi-stationary zones of convection, oriented parallel to the coast and approximately 15 n mi apart, where echoes increase in frequency and in height. The preferred zones, which shift slightly but in unison and nearly in synchronization with the development and decay of the sea breeze during the day, are thought to be induced by a combination of dynamic and thermodynamic effects.

Full access
Kalipada Chatterjee and Harold P. Gerrish

Abstract

Full access
Harold P. Gerrish and Max Mayfield

Abstract

A summary of the 1988 season is presented. Included are season statistics, comparisons with activity in recent years, and tracks of tropical storms and hurricanes.

Full access
Robert A. Case and Harold P. Gerrish

Abstract

A general summary of the 1983 hurricane season is presented. Four named tropical cyclones were tracked during the season. Three landfalls occurred. Alicia, the first cyclone of the season, ended a three-year period during which no hurricanes reached the United States coastline.

Full access
Robert A. Case and Harold P. Gerrish

Abstract

The general overview of the 1987 hurricane season in the North Atlantic is presented together with detailed accounts of all named storms. In addition, an unnamed tropical storm and a tropical depression that required watches and/or warnings on the U.S. coastline are discussed.

Full access