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  • Author or Editor: J. R. Drummond x
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A. J. Drummond
and
A. R. Karoli
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J. E. Harries
,
J. E. Russell
,
J. A. Hanafin
,
H. Brindley
,
J. Futyan
,
J. Rufus
,
S. Kellock
,
G. Matthews
,
R. Wrigley
,
A. Last
,
J. Mueller
,
R. Mossavati
,
J. Ashmall
,
E. Sawyer
,
D. Parker
,
M. Caldwell
,
P M. Allan
,
A. Smith
,
M. J. Bates
,
B. Coan
,
B. C. Stewart
,
D. R. Lepine
,
L. A. Cornwall
,
D. R. Corney
,
M. J. Ricketts
,
D. Drummond
,
D. Smart
,
R. Cutler
,
S. Dewitte
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N. Clerbaux
,
L. Gonzalez
,
A. Ipe
,
C. Bertrand
,
A. Joukoff
,
D. Crommelynck
,
N. Nelms
,
D. T. Llewellyn-Jones
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G. Butcher
,
G. L. Smith
,
Z. P Szewczyk
,
P E. Mlynczak
,
A. Slingo
,
R. P. Allan
, and
M. A. Ringer

This paper reports on a new satellite sensor, the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) experiment. GERB is designed to make the first measurements of the Earth's radiation budget from geostationary orbit. Measurements at high absolute accuracy of the reflected sunlight from the Earth, and the thermal radiation emitted by the Earth are made every 15 min, with a spatial resolution at the subsatellite point of 44.6 km (north–south) by 39.3 km (east–west). With knowledge of the incoming solar constant, this gives the primary forcing and response components of the top-of-atmosphere radiation. The first GERB instrument is an instrument of opportunity on Meteosat-8, a new spin-stabilized spacecraft platform also carrying the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared (SEVIRI) sensor, which is currently positioned over the equator at 3.5°W. This overview of the project includes a description of the instrument design and its preflight and in-flight calibration. An evaluation of the instrument performance after its first year in orbit, including comparisons with data from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) satellite sensors and with output from numerical models, are also presented. After a brief summary of the data processing system and data products, some of the scientific studies that are being undertaken using these early data are described. This marks the beginning of a decade or more of observations from GERB, as subsequent models will fly on each of the four Meteosat Second Generation satellites.

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Taneil Uttal
,
Sandra Starkweather
,
James R. Drummond
,
Timo Vihma
,
Alexander P. Makshtas
,
Lisa S. Darby
,
John F. Burkhart
,
Christopher J. Cox
,
Lauren N. Schmeisser
,
Thomas Haiden
,
Marion Maturilli
,
Matthew D. Shupe
,
Gijs De Boer
,
Auromeet Saha
,
Andrey A. Grachev
,
Sara M. Crepinsek
,
Lori Bruhwiler
,
Barry Goodison
,
Bruce McArthur
,
Von P. Walden
,
Edward J. Dlugokencky
,
P. Ola G. Persson
,
Glen Lesins
,
Tuomas Laurila
,
John A. Ogren
,
Robert Stone
,
Charles N. Long
,
Sangeeta Sharma
,
Andreas Massling
,
David D. Turner
,
Diane M. Stanitski
,
Eija Asmi
,
Mika Aurela
,
Henrik Skov
,
Konstantinos Eleftheriadis
,
Aki Virkkula
,
Andrew Platt
,
Eirik J. Førland
,
Yoshihiro Iijima
,
Ingeborg E. Nielsen
,
Michael H. Bergin
,
Lauren Candlish
,
Nikita S. Zimov
,
Sergey A. Zimov
,
Norman T. O’Neill
,
Pierre F. Fogal
,
Rigel Kivi
,
Elena A. Konopleva-Akish
,
Johannes Verlinde
,
Vasily Y. Kustov
,
Brian Vasel
,
Viktor M. Ivakhov
,
Yrjö Viisanen
, and
Janet M. Intrieri

Abstract

International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) activities and partnerships were initiated as a part of the 2007–09 International Polar Year (IPY) and are expected to continue for many decades as a legacy program. The IASOA focus is on coordinating intensive measurements of the Arctic atmosphere collected in the United States, Canada, Russia, Norway, Finland, and Greenland to create synthesis science that leads to an understanding of why and not just how the Arctic atmosphere is evolving. The IASOA premise is that there are limitations with Arctic modeling and satellite observations that can only be addressed with boots-on-the-ground, in situ observations and that the potential of combining individual station and network measurements into an integrated observing system is tremendous. The IASOA vision is that by further integrating with other network observing programs focusing on hydrology, glaciology, oceanography, terrestrial, and biological systems it will be possible to understand the mechanisms of the entire Arctic system, perhaps well enough for humans to mitigate undesirable variations and adapt to inevitable change.

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