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  • Author or Editor: James J. Moore x
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Bart Geerts
,
David J. Raymond
,
Vanda Grubišić
,
Christopher A. Davis
,
Mary C. Barth
,
Andrew Detwiler
,
Petra M. Klein
,
Wen-Chau Lee
,
Paul M. Markowski
,
Gretchen L. Mullendore
, and
James A. Moore

Abstract

Recommendations are presented for in situ and remote sensing instruments and capabilities needed to advance the study of convection and turbulence in the atmosphere. These recommendations emerged from a community workshop held on 22–24 May 2017 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Four areas of research were distinguished at this workshop: i) boundary layer flows, including convective and stable boundary layers over heterogeneous land use and terrain conditions; ii) dynamics and thermodynamics of convection, including deep and shallow convection and continental and maritime convection; iii) turbulence above the boundary layer in clouds and in clear air, terrain driven and elsewhere; and iv) cloud microphysical and chemical processes in convection, including cloud electricity and lightning.

The recommendations presented herein address a series of facilities and capabilities, ranging from existing ones that continue to fulfill science needs and thus should be retained and/or incrementally improved, to urgently needed new facilities, to desired capabilities for which no adequate solutions are as yet on the horizon. A common thread among all recommendations is the need for more highly resolved sampling, both in space and in time. Significant progress is anticipated, especially through the improved availability of airborne and ground-based remote sensors to the National Science Foundation (NSF)-supported community.

Full access
Robert A. Houze Jr.
,
Shuyi S. Chen
,
Wen-Chau Lee
,
Robert F. Rogers
,
James A. Moore
,
Gregory J. Stossmeister
,
Michael M. Bell
,
Jasmine Cetrone
,
Wei Zhao
, and
S. Rita Brodzik

The Hurricane Rainband and Intensity Change Experiment (RAINEX) used three P3 aircraft aided by high-resolution numerical modeling and satellite communications to investigate the 2005 Hurricanes Katrina, Ophelia, and Rita. The aim was to increase the understanding of tropical cyclone intensity change by interactions between a tropical cyclone's inner core and rainbands. All three aircraft had dual-Doppler radars, with the Electra Doppler Radar (ELDORA) on board the Naval Research Laboratory's P3 aircraft, providing particularly detailed Doppler radar data. Numerical model forecasts helped plan the aircraft missions, and innovative communications and data transfer in real time allowed the flights to be coordinated from a ground-based operations center. The P3 aircraft released approximately 600 dropsondes in locations targeted for optimal coordination with the Doppler radar data, as guided by the operations center. The storms were observed in all stages of development, from tropical depression to category 5 hurricane. The data from RAINEX are readily available through an online Field Catalog and RAINEX Data Archive. The RAINEX dataset is illustrated in this article by a preliminary analysis of Hurricane Rita, which was documented by multiaircraft flights on five days 1) while a tropical storm, 2) while rapidly intensifying to a category 5 hurricane, 3) during an eye-wall replacement, 4) when the hurricane became asymmetric upon encountering environmental shear, and 5) just prior to landfall.

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John T. Sullivan
,
Timothy Berkoff
,
Guillaume Gronoff
,
Travis Knepp
,
Margaret Pippin
,
Danette Allen
,
Laurence Twigg
,
Robert Swap
,
Maria Tzortziou
,
Anne M. Thompson
,
Ryan M. Stauffer
,
Glenn M. Wolfe
,
James Flynn
,
Sally E. Pusede
,
Laura M. Judd
,
William Moore
,
Barry D. Baker
,
Jay Al-Saadi
, and
Thomas J. McGee

Abstract

Coastal regions have historically represented a significant challenge for air quality investigations because of water–land boundary transition characteristics and a paucity of measurements available over water. Prior studies have identified the formation of high levels of ozone over water bodies, such as the Chesapeake Bay, that can potentially recirculate back over land to significantly impact populated areas. Earth-observing satellites and forecast models face challenges in capturing the coastal transition zone where small-scale meteorological dynamics are complex and large changes in pollutants can occur on very short spatial and temporal scales. An observation strategy is presented to synchronously measure pollutants “over land” and “over water” to provide a more complete picture of chemical gradients across coastal boundaries for both the needs of state and local environmental management and new remote sensing platforms. Intensive vertical profile information from ozone lidar systems and ozonesondes, obtained at two main sites, one over land and the other over water, are complemented by remote sensing and in situ observations of air quality from ground-based, airborne (both personned and unpersonned), and shipborne platforms. These observations, coupled with reliable chemical transport simulations, such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC), are expected to lead to a more fully characterized and complete land–water interaction observing system that can be used to assess future geostationary air quality instruments, such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO), and current low-Earth-orbiting satellites, such as the European Space Agency’s Sentinel-5 Precursor (S5-P) with its Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI).

Open access
Alain Joly
,
Dave Jorgensen
,
Melvyn A. Shapiro
,
Alan Thorpe
,
Pierre Bessemoulin
,
Keith A. Browning
,
Jean-Pierre Cammas
,
Jean-Pierre Chalon
,
Sidney A. Clough
,
Kerry A. Emanuel
,
Laurence Eymard
,
Robert Gall
,
Peter H. Hildebrand
,
Rolf H. Langland
,
Yvon Lemaître
,
Peter Lynch
,
James A. Moore
,
P. Ola G. Persson
,
Chris Snyder
, and
Roger M. Wakimoto

The Fronts and Atlantic Storm-Track Experiment (FASTEX) will address the life cycle of cyclones evolving over the North Atlantic Ocean in January and February 1997. The objectives of FASTEX are to improve the forecasts of end-of-storm-track cyclogenesis (primarily in the eastern Atlantic but with applicability to the Pacific) in the range 24 to 72 h, to enable the testing of theoretical ideas on cyclone formation and development, and to document the vertical and the mesoscale structure of cloud systems in mature cyclones and their relation to the dynamics. The observing system includes ships that will remain in the vicinity of the main baroclinic zone in the central Atlantic Ocean, jet aircraft that will fly and drop sondes off the east coast of North America or over the central Atlantic Ocean, turboprop aircraft that will survey mature cyclones off Ireland with dropsondes, and airborne Doppler radars, including ASTRAIA/ELDORA. Radiosounding frequency around the North Atlantic basin will be increased, as well as the number of drifting buoys. These facilities will be activated during multiple-day intensive observing periods in order to observe the same meteorological systems at several stages of their life cycle. A central archive will be developed in quasi-real time in Toulouse, France, thus allowing data to be made widely available to the scientific community.

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James D. Doyle
,
Jonathan R. Moskaitis
,
Joel W. Feldmeier
,
Ronald J. Ferek
,
Mark Beaubien
,
Michael M. Bell
,
Daniel L. Cecil
,
Robert L. Creasey
,
Patrick Duran
,
Russell L. Elsberry
,
William A. Komaromi
,
John Molinari
,
David R. Ryglicki
,
Daniel P. Stern
,
Christopher S. Velden
,
Xuguang Wang
,
Todd Allen
,
Bradford S. Barrett
,
Peter G. Black
,
Jason P. Dunion
,
Kerry A. Emanuel
,
Patrick A. Harr
,
Lee Harrison
,
Eric A. Hendricks
,
Derrick Herndon
,
William Q. Jeffries
,
Sharanya J. Majumdar
,
James A. Moore
,
Zhaoxia Pu
,
Robert F. Rogers
,
Elizabeth R. Sanabia
,
Gregory J. Tripoli
, and
Da-Lin Zhang

Abstract

Tropical cyclone (TC) outflow and its relationship to TC intensity change and structure were investigated in the Office of Naval Research Tropical Cyclone Intensity (TCI) field program during 2015 using dropsondes deployed from the innovative new High-Definition Sounding System (HDSS) and remotely sensed observations from the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD), both on board the NASA WB-57 that flew in the lower stratosphere. Three noteworthy hurricanes were intensively observed with unprecedented horizontal resolution: Joaquin in the Atlantic and Marty and Patricia in the eastern North Pacific. Nearly 800 dropsondes were deployed from the WB-57 flight level of ∼60,000 ft (∼18 km), recording atmospheric conditions from the lower stratosphere to the surface, while HIRAD measured the surface winds in a 50-km-wide swath with a horizontal resolution of 2 km. Dropsonde transects with 4–10-km spacing through the inner cores of Hurricanes Patricia, Joaquin, and Marty depict the large horizontal and vertical gradients in winds and thermodynamic properties. An innovative technique utilizing GPS positions of the HDSS reveals the vortex tilt in detail not possible before. In four TCI flights over Joaquin, systematic measurements of a major hurricane’s outflow layer were made at high spatial resolution for the first time. Dropsondes deployed at 4-km intervals as the WB-57 flew over the center of Hurricane Patricia reveal in unprecedented detail the inner-core structure and upper-tropospheric outflow associated with this historic hurricane. Analyses and numerical modeling studies are in progress to understand and predict the complex factors that influenced Joaquin’s and Patricia’s unusual intensity changes.

Open access
David A. Peterson
,
Laura H. Thapa
,
Pablo E. Saide
,
Amber J. Soja
,
Emily M. Gargulinski
,
Edward J. Hyer
,
Bernadett Weinzierl
,
Maximilian Dollner
,
Manuel Schöberl
,
Philippe P. Papin
,
Shobha Kondragunta
,
Christopher P. Camacho
,
Charles Ichoku
,
Richard H. Moore
,
Johnathan W. Hair
,
James H. Crawford
,
Philip E. Dennison
,
Olga V. Kalashnikova
,
Christel E. Bennese
,
Thaopaul P. Bui
,
Joshua P. DiGangi
,
Glenn S. Diskin
,
Marta A. Fenn
,
Hannah S. Halliday
,
Jose Jimenez
,
John B. Nowak
,
Claire Robinson
,
Kevin Sanchez
,
Taylor J. Shingler
,
Lee Thornhill
,
Elizabeth B. Wiggins
,
Edward Winstead
, and
Chuanyu Xu

Abstract

The 2019 Fire Influence on Regional to Global Environments and Air Quality (FIREX-AQ) field experiment obtained a diverse set of in situ and remotely sensed measurements before and during a pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb) event over the Williams Flats fire in Washington State. This unique dataset confirms that pyroCb activity is an efficient vertical smoke transport pathway into the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The magnitude of smoke plumes observed in the UTLS has increased significantly in recent years, following unprecedented wildfire and pyroCb activity observed worldwide. The FIREX-AQ pyroCb dataset is therefore extremely relevant to a broad community, providing the first measurements of fresh smoke exhaust in the upper troposphere, including from within active pyroCb cloud tops. High-resolution remote sensing reveals that three plume cores linked to localized fire fronts, burning primarily in dense forest fuels, contributed to four total pyroCb “pulses.” Rapid changes in fire geometry and spatial extent dramatically influenced the magnitude, behavior, and duration of pyroCb activity. Cloud probe measurements and weather radar identify the presence of large ice particles within the pyroCb and hydrometers below cloud base, indicating precipitation development. The resulting feedbacks suggest that vertical smoke transport efficiency was reduced slightly when compared with intense pyroCb events reaching the lower stratosphere. Physical and optical aerosol property measurements in pyroCb exhaust are compared with previous assumptions. A large suite of aerosol and gas-phase chemistry measurements sets a foundation for future studies aimed at understanding the composition of smoke plumes lifted by pyroconvection into the UTLS and their role in the climate system.

Full access
Nirnimesh Kumar
,
James A. Lerczak
,
Tongtong Xu
,
Amy F. Waterhouse
,
Jim Thomson
,
Eric J. Terrill
,
Christy Swann
,
Sutara H. Suanda
,
Matthew S. Spydell
,
Pieter B. Smit
,
Alexandra Simpson
,
Roland Romeiser
,
Stephen D. Pierce
,
Tony de Paolo
,
André Palóczy
,
Annika O’Dea
,
Lisa Nyman
,
James N. Moum
,
Melissa Moulton
,
Andrew M. Moore
,
Arthur J. Miller
,
Ryan S. Mieras
,
Sophia T. Merrifield
,
Kendall Melville
,
Jacqueline M. McSweeney
,
Jamie MacMahan
,
Jennifer A. MacKinnon
,
Björn Lund
,
Emanuele Di Lorenzo
,
Luc Lenain
,
Michael Kovatch
,
Tim T. Janssen
,
Sean R. Haney
,
Merrick C. Haller
,
Kevin Haas
,
Derek J. Grimes
,
Hans C. Graber
,
Matt K. Gough
,
David A. Fertitta
,
Falk Feddersen
,
Christopher A. Edwards
,
William Crawford
,
John Colosi
,
C. Chris Chickadel
,
Sean Celona
,
Joseph Calantoni
,
Edward F. Braithwaite III
,
Johannes Becherer
,
John A. Barth
, and
Seongho Ahn

Abstract

The inner shelf, the transition zone between the surfzone and the midshelf, is a dynamically complex region with the evolution of circulation and stratification driven by multiple physical processes. Cross-shelf exchange through the inner shelf has important implications for coastal water quality, ecological connectivity, and lateral movement of sediment and heat. The Inner-Shelf Dynamics Experiment (ISDE) was an intensive, coordinated, multi-institution field experiment from September–October 2017, conducted from the midshelf, through the inner shelf, and into the surfzone near Point Sal, California. Satellite, airborne, shore- and ship-based remote sensing, in-water moorings and ship-based sampling, and numerical ocean circulation models forced by winds, waves, and tides were used to investigate the dynamics governing the circulation and transport in the inner shelf and the role of coastline variability on regional circulation dynamics. Here, the following physical processes are highlighted: internal wave dynamics from the midshelf to the inner shelf; flow separation and eddy shedding off Point Sal; offshore ejection of surfzone waters from rip currents; and wind-driven subtidal circulation dynamics. The extensive dataset from ISDE allows for unprecedented investigations into the role of physical processes in creating spatial heterogeneity, and nonlinear interactions between various inner-shelf physical processes. Overall, the highly spatially and temporally resolved oceanographic measurements and numerical simulations of ISDE provide a central framework for studies exploring this complex and fascinating region of the ocean.

Full access
David C. Fritts
,
Ronald B. Smith
,
Michael J. Taylor
,
James D. Doyle
,
Stephen D. Eckermann
,
Andreas Dörnbrack
,
Markus Rapp
,
Bifford P. Williams
,
P.-Dominique Pautet
,
Katrina Bossert
,
Neal R. Criddle
,
Carolyn A. Reynolds
,
P. Alex Reinecke
,
Michael Uddstrom
,
Michael J. Revell
,
Richard Turner
,
Bernd Kaifler
,
Johannes S. Wagner
,
Tyler Mixa
,
Christopher G. Kruse
,
Alison D. Nugent
,
Campbell D. Watson
,
Sonja Gisinger
,
Steven M. Smith
,
Ruth S. Lieberman
,
Brian Laughman
,
James J. Moore
,
William O. Brown
,
Julie A. Haggerty
,
Alison Rockwell
,
Gregory J. Stossmeister
,
Steven F. Williams
,
Gonzalo Hernandez
,
Damian J. Murphy
,
Andrew R. Klekociuk
,
Iain M. Reid
, and
Jun Ma

Abstract

The Deep Propagating Gravity Wave Experiment (DEEPWAVE) was designed to quantify gravity wave (GW) dynamics and effects from orographic and other sources to regions of dissipation at high altitudes. The core DEEPWAVE field phase took place from May through July 2014 using a comprehensive suite of airborne and ground-based instruments providing measurements from Earth’s surface to ∼100 km. Austral winter was chosen to observe deep GW propagation to high altitudes. DEEPWAVE was based on South Island, New Zealand, to provide access to the New Zealand and Tasmanian “hotspots” of GW activity and additional GW sources over the Southern Ocean and Tasman Sea. To observe GWs up to ∼100 km, DEEPWAVE utilized three new instruments built specifically for the National Science Foundation (NSF)/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Gulfstream V (GV): a Rayleigh lidar, a sodium resonance lidar, and an advanced mesosphere temperature mapper. These measurements were supplemented by in situ probes, dropsondes, and a microwave temperature profiler on the GV and by in situ probes and a Doppler lidar aboard the German DLR Falcon. Extensive ground-based instrumentation and radiosondes were deployed on South Island, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean islands. Deep orographic GWs were a primary target but multiple flights also observed deep GWs arising from deep convection, jet streams, and frontal systems. Highlights include the following: 1) strong orographic GW forcing accompanying strong cross-mountain flows, 2) strong high-altitude responses even when orographic forcing was weak, 3) large-scale GWs at high altitudes arising from jet stream sources, and 4) significant flight-level energy fluxes and often very large momentum fluxes at high altitudes.

Full access
David A. R. Kristovich
,
George S. Young
,
Johannes Verlinde
,
Peter J. Sousounis
,
Pierre Mourad
,
Donald Lenschow
,
Robert M. Rauber
,
Mohan K. Ramamurthy
,
Brian F. Jewett
,
Kenneth Beard
,
Elen Cutrim
,
Paul J. DeMott
,
Edwin W. Eloranta
,
Mark R. Hjelmfelt
,
Sonia M. Kreidenweis
,
Jon Martin
,
James Moore
,
Harry T. Ochs III
,
David C Rogers
,
John Scala
,
Gregory Tripoli
, and
John Young

A severe 5-day lake-effect storm resulted in eight deaths, hundreds of injuries, and over $3 million in damage to a small area of northeastern Ohio and northwestern Pennsylvania in November 1996. In 1999, a blizzard associated with an intense cyclone disabled Chicago and much of the U.S. Midwest with 30–90 cm of snow. Such winter weather conditions have many impacts on the lives and property of people throughout much of North America. Each of these events is the culmination of a complex interaction between synoptic-scale, mesoscale, and microscale processes.

An understanding of how the multiple size scales and timescales interact is critical to improving forecasting of these severe winter weather events. The Lake-Induced Convection Experiment (Lake-ICE) and the Snowband Dynamics Project (SNOWBAND) collected comprehensive datasets on processes involved in lake-effect snowstorms and snowbands associated with cyclones during the winter of 1997/98. This paper outlines the goals and operations of these collaborative projects. Preliminary findings are given with illustrative examples of new state-of-the-art research observations collected. Analyses associated with Lake-ICE and SNOWBAND hold the promise of greatly improving our scientific understanding of processes involved in these important wintertime phenomena.

Full access
Ian M. Brooks
,
Margaret J. Yelland
,
Robert C. Upstill-Goddard
,
Philip D. Nightingale
,
Steve Archer
,
Eric d'Asaro
,
Rachael Beale
,
Cory Beatty
,
Byron Blomquist
,
A. Anthony Bloom
,
Barbara J. Brooks
,
John Cluderay
,
David Coles
,
John Dacey
,
Michael DeGrandpre
,
Jo Dixon
,
William M. Drennan
,
Joseph Gabriele
,
Laura Goldson
,
Nick Hardman-Mountford
,
Martin K. Hill
,
Matt Horn
,
Ping-Chang Hsueh
,
Barry Huebert
,
Gerrit de Leeuw
,
Timothy G. Leighton
,
Malcolm Liddicoat
,
Justin J. N. Lingard
,
Craig McNeil
,
James B. McQuaid
,
Ben I. Moat
,
Gerald Moore
,
Craig Neill
,
Sarah J. Norris
,
Simon O'Doherty
,
Robin W. Pascal
,
John Prytherch
,
Mike Rebozo
,
Erik Sahlee
,
Matt Salter
,
Ute Schuster
,
Ingunn Skjelvan
,
Hans Slagter
,
Michael H. Smith
,
Paul D. Smith
,
Meric Srokosz
,
John A. Stephens
,
Peter K. Taylor
,
Maciej Telszewski
,
Roisin Walsh
,
Brian Ward
,
David K. Woolf
,
Dickon Young
, and
Henk Zemmelink

As part of the U.K. contribution to the international Surface Ocean-Lower Atmosphere Study, a series of three related projects—DOGEE, SEASAW, and HiWASE—undertook experimental studies of the processes controlling the physical exchange of gases and sea spray aerosol at the sea surface. The studies share a common goal: to reduce the high degree of uncertainty in current parameterization schemes. The wide variety of measurements made during the studies, which incorporated tracer and surfactant release experiments, included direct eddy correlation fluxes, detailed wave spectra, wind history, photographic retrievals of whitecap fraction, aerosolsize spectra and composition, surfactant concentration, and bubble populations in the ocean mixed layer. Measurements were made during three cruises in the northeast Atlantic on the RRS Discovery during 2006 and 2007; a fourth campaign has been making continuous measurements on the Norwegian weather ship Polarfront since September 2006. This paper provides an overview of the three projects and some of the highlights of the measurement campaigns.

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