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Craig A. Stroud
,
Athanasios Nenes
,
Jose L. Jimenez
,
Peter F. DeCarlo
,
J. Alex Huffman
,
Roelof Bruintjes
,
Eiko Nemitz
,
Alice E. Delia
,
Darin W. Toohey
,
Alex B. Guenther
, and
Sreela Nandi

Abstract

Measurements of aerosol size distribution, chemical composition, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration were performed during the Chemical Emission, Loss, Transformation, and Interactions with Canopies (CELTIC) field program at Duke Forest in North Carolina. A kinetic model of the cloud activation of ambient aerosol in the chamber of the CCN instrument was used to perform an aerosol–CCN closure study. This study advances prior investigations by employing a novel fitting algorithm that was used to integrate scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) measurements of aerosol number size distribution and aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements of the mass size distribution for sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and organics into a single, coherent description of the ambient aerosol in the size range critical to aerosol activation (around 100-nm diameter). Three lognormal aerosol size modes, each with a unique internally mixed composition, were used as input into the kinetic model. For the two smaller size modes, which control CCN number concentration, organic aerosol mass fractions for the defined cases were between 58% and 77%. This study is also unique in that the water vapor accommodation coefficient was estimated based on comparing the initial timing for CCN activation in the instrument chamber with the activation predicted by the kinetic model. The kinetic model overestimated measured CCN concentrations, especially under polluted conditions. Prior studies have attributed a positive model bias to an incomplete understanding of the aerosol composition, especially the role of organics in the activation process. This study shows that including measured organic mass fractions with an assumed organic aerosol speciation profile (pinic acid, fulvic acid, and levoglucosan) and an assumed organic aerosol solubility of 0.02 kg kg−1 still resulted in a significant model positive bias for polluted case study periods. The slope and y intercept for the CCN predicted versus CCN observed regression was found to be 1.9 and −180 cm−3, respectively. The overprediction generally does not exceed uncertainty limits but is indicative that a bias exists in the measurements or application of model. From this study, uncertainties in the particle number and mass size distributions as the cause for the model bias can be ruled out. The authors are also confident that the model is including the effects of growth kinetics on predicted activated number. However, one cannot rule out uncertainties associated with poorly characterized CCN measurement biases, uncertainties in assumed organic solubility, and uncertainties in aerosol mixing state. Sensitivity simulations suggest that assuming either an insoluble organic fraction or external aerosol mixing were both sufficient to reconcile the model bias.

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EC-Earth

A Seamless Earth-System Prediction Approach in Action

Wilco Hazeleger
,
Camiel Severijns
,
Tido Semmler
,
Simona Ştefănescu
,
Shuting Yang
,
Xueli Wang
,
Klaus Wyser
,
Emanuel Dutra
,
José M. Baldasano
,
Richard Bintanja
,
Philippe Bougeault
,
Rodrigo Caballero
,
Annica M. L. Ekman
,
Jens H. Christensen
,
Bart van den Hurk
,
Pedro Jimenez
,
Colin Jones
,
Per Kållberg
,
Torben Koenigk
,
Ray McGrath
,
Pedro Miranda
,
Twan van Noije
,
Tim Palmer
,
José A. Parodi
,
Torben Schmith
,
Frank Selten
,
Trude Storelvmo
,
Andreas Sterl
,
Honoré Tapamo
,
Martin Vancoppenolle
,
Pedro Viterbo
, and
Ulrika Willén
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Mary C. Barth
,
Christopher A. Cantrell
,
William H. Brune
,
Steven A. Rutledge
,
James H. Crawford
,
Heidi Huntrieser
,
Lawrence D. Carey
,
Donald MacGorman
,
Morris Weisman
,
Kenneth E. Pickering
,
Eric Bruning
,
Bruce Anderson
,
Eric Apel
,
Michael Biggerstaff
,
Teresa Campos
,
Pedro Campuzano-Jost
,
Ronald Cohen
,
John Crounse
,
Douglas A. Day
,
Glenn Diskin
,
Frank Flocke
,
Alan Fried
,
Charity Garland
,
Brian Heikes
,
Shawn Honomichl
,
Rebecca Hornbrook
,
L. Gregory Huey
,
Jose L. Jimenez
,
Timothy Lang
,
Michael Lichtenstern
,
Tomas Mikoviny
,
Benjamin Nault
,
Daniel O’Sullivan
,
Laura L. Pan
,
Jeff Peischl
,
Ilana Pollack
,
Dirk Richter
,
Daniel Riemer
,
Thomas Ryerson
,
Hans Schlager
,
Jason St. Clair
,
James Walega
,
Petter Weibring
,
Andrew Weinheimer
,
Paul Wennberg
,
Armin Wisthaler
,
Paul J. Wooldridge
, and
Conrad Ziegler

Abstract

The Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) field experiment produced an exceptional dataset on thunderstorms, including their dynamical, physical, and electrical structures and their impact on the chemical composition of the troposphere. The field experiment gathered detailed information on the chemical composition of the inflow and outflow regions of midlatitude thunderstorms in northeast Colorado, west Texas to central Oklahoma, and northern Alabama. A unique aspect of the DC3 strategy was to locate and sample the convective outflow a day after active convection in order to measure the chemical transformations within the upper-tropospheric convective plume. These data are being analyzed to investigate transport and dynamics of the storms, scavenging of soluble trace gases and aerosols, production of nitrogen oxides by lightning, relationships between lightning flash rates and storm parameters, chemistry in the upper troposphere that is affected by the convection, and related source characterization of the three sampling regions. DC3 also documented biomass-burning plumes and the interactions of these plumes with deep convection.

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Annmarie G. Carlton
,
Joost de Gouw
,
Jose L. Jimenez
,
Jesse L. Ambrose
,
Alexis R. Attwood
,
Steven Brown
,
Kirk R. Baker
,
Charles Brock
,
Ronald C. Cohen
,
Sylvia Edgerton
,
Caroline M. Farkas
,
Delphine Farmer
,
Allen H. Goldstein
,
Lynne Gratz
,
Alex Guenther
,
Sherri Hunt
,
Lyatt Jaeglé
,
Daniel A. Jaffe
,
John Mak
,
Crystal McClure
,
Athanasios Nenes
,
Thien Khoi Nguyen
,
Jeffrey R. Pierce
,
Suzane de Sa
,
Noelle E. Selin
,
Viral Shah
,
Stephanie Shaw
,
Paul B. Shepson
,
Shaojie Song
,
Jochen Stutz
,
Jason D. Surratt
,
Barbara J. Turpin
,
Carsten Warneke
,
Rebecca A. Washenfelder
,
Paul O. Wennberg
, and
Xianling Zhou

Abstract

The Southeast Atmosphere Studies (SAS), which included the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS); the Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study; and the Nitrogen, Oxidants, Mercury and Aerosols: Distributions, Sources and Sinks (NOMADSS) study, was deployed in the field from 1 June to 15 July 2013 in the central and eastern United States, and it overlapped with and was complemented by the Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign. SAS investigated atmospheric chemistry and the associated air quality and climate-relevant particle properties. Coordinated measurements from six ground sites, four aircraft, tall towers, balloon-borne sondes, existing surface networks, and satellites provide in situ and remotely sensed data on trace-gas composition, aerosol physicochemical properties, and local and synoptic meteorology. Selected SAS findings indicate 1) dramatically reduced NOx concentrations have altered ozone production regimes; 2) indicators of “biogenic” secondary organic aerosol (SOA), once considered part of the natural background, were positively correlated with one or more indicators of anthropogenic pollution; and 3) liquid water dramatically impacted particle scattering while biogenic SOA did not. SAS findings suggest that atmosphere–biosphere interactions modulate ambient pollutant concentrations through complex mechanisms and feedbacks not yet adequately captured in atmospheric models. The SAS dataset, now publicly available, is a powerful constraint to develop predictive capability that enhances model representation of the response and subsequent impacts of changes in atmospheric composition to changes in emissions, chemistry, and meteorology.

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Chelsea R. Thompson
,
Steven C. Wofsy
,
Michael J. Prather
,
Paul A. Newman
,
Thomas F. Hanisco
,
Thomas B. Ryerson
,
David W. Fahey
,
Eric C. Apel
,
Charles A. Brock
,
William H. Brune
,
Karl Froyd
,
Joseph M. Katich
,
Julie M. Nicely
,
Jeff Peischl
,
Eric Ray
,
Patrick R. Veres
,
Siyuan Wang
,
Hannah M. Allen
,
Elizabeth Asher
,
Huisheng Bian
,
Donald Blake
,
Ilann Bourgeois
,
John Budney
,
T. Paul Bui
,
Amy Butler
,
Pedro Campuzano-Jost
,
Cecilia Chang
,
Mian Chin
,
Róisín Commane
,
Gus Correa
,
John D. Crounse
,
Bruce Daube
,
Jack E. Dibb
,
Joshua P. DiGangi
,
Glenn S. Diskin
,
Maximilian Dollner
,
James W. Elkins
,
Arlene M. Fiore
,
Clare M. Flynn
,
Hao Guo
,
Samuel R. Hall
,
Reem A. Hannun
,
Alan Hills
,
Eric J. Hintsa
,
Alma Hodzic
,
Rebecca S. Hornbrook
,
L. Greg Huey
,
Jose L. Jimenez
,
Ralph F. Keeling
,
Michelle J. Kim
,
Agnieszka Kupc
,
Forrest Lacey
,
Leslie R. Lait
,
Jean-Francois Lamarque
,
Junhua Liu
,
Kathryn McKain
,
Simone Meinardi
,
David O. Miller
,
Stephen A. Montzka
,
Fred L. Moore
,
Eric J. Morgan
,
Daniel M. Murphy
,
Lee T. Murray
,
Benjamin A. Nault
,
J. Andrew Neuman
,
Louis Nguyen
,
Yenny Gonzalez
,
Andrew Rollins
,
Karen Rosenlof
,
Maryann Sargent
,
Gregory Schill
,
Joshua P. Schwarz
,
Jason M. St. Clair
,
Stephen D. Steenrod
,
Britton B. Stephens
,
Susan E. Strahan
,
Sarah A. Strode
,
Colm Sweeney
,
Alexander B. Thames
,
Kirk Ullmann
,
Nicholas Wagner
,
Rodney Weber
,
Bernadett Weinzierl
,
Paul O. Wennberg
,
Christina J. Williamson
,
Glenn M. Wolfe
, and
Linghan Zeng

Abstract

This article provides an overview of the NASA Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) mission and a summary of selected scientific findings to date. ATom was an airborne measurements and modeling campaign aimed at characterizing the composition and chemistry of the troposphere over the most remote regions of the Pacific, Southern, Atlantic, and Arctic Oceans, and examining the impact of anthropogenic and natural emissions on a global scale. These remote regions dominate global chemical reactivity and are exceptionally important for global air quality and climate. ATom data provide the in situ measurements needed to understand the range of chemical species and their reactions, and to test satellite remote sensing observations and global models over large regions of the remote atmosphere. Lack of data in these regions, particularly over the oceans, has limited our understanding of how atmospheric composition is changing in response to shifting anthropogenic emissions and physical climate change. ATom was designed as a global-scale tomographic sampling mission with extensive geographic and seasonal coverage, tropospheric vertical profiling, and detailed speciation of reactive compounds and pollution tracers. ATom flew the NASA DC-8 research aircraft over four seasons to collect a comprehensive suite of measurements of gases, aerosols, and radical species from the remote troposphere and lower stratosphere on four global circuits from 2016 to 2018. Flights maintained near-continuous vertical profiling of 0.15–13-km altitudes on long meridional transects of the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins. Analysis and modeling of ATom data have led to the significant early findings highlighted here.

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