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Roy L. Lamberth

Instruments and techniques are described which were used in a study of dust devils which was made with stationary sensors in the desert of southern New Mexico. Results of observation of 21 storms including measurements of pressure, wind velocity, and other parameters are presented in tabular form. Wind speeds less than 40 knots and pressure decreases of a few millibars were typical. The dust devils were about equally divided between those rotating cyclonically and anticyclonically. A more complete study of dust devils could be made using mobile sensors with more rapid response characteristics, better definition and lower overshoot than those used in this study.

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Roy L. Lamberth

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Willis L. Webb and Roy L. Lamberth
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Ralph D. Reynolds and Roy L. Lamberth

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A cause of erroneous temperatures obtained in the earlier phases of a study using standard radiosondes flown on constant-level balloons at White Sands Missile Range is discussed. A simple and inexpensive modification of the radiosondes which produces more accurate ambient temperatures on daylight flights is described.

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Roy I. Glass, Ralph D. Reynolds, and Roy L. Lamberth

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This paper describes how continuous pressure measurements may be obtained by making a relatively simple modification to any standard or clock-switched radiosonde which can be flown on a rising or floating balloon. The continuous pressure device is composed of an aneroid sensor which controls the frequency of a subcarrier oscillator. Frequency modulation of the radiosonde transmitting tube is used instead of amplitude modulation. The receiver for this system utilizes the standard GMD-1B ground tracker with a special demodulator, the standard TMQ-5 recorder, and a frequency counter with printer. Each pressure sensor is calibrated for frequency vs. pressure; precision of reading the pressure is to 1 mb as currently used, but readings to 0.1 mb are easily obtainable.

Pressure data from three superpressure balloon flights are presented to show the detail obtained by the instrument with this modification. This modified instrument provides the research meteorologist with a new inexpensive research tool.

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Ralph D. Reynolds, Roy L. Lamberth, and M. G. Wurtele

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A complex mountain lee wave was recorded by radar-tracked superpressure balloons at White Sands Missile Range on 6 May 1965 at a mean altitude of 3.5 km MSL; simultaneously, a very weak wave was recorded at 7 km. The lower complex wave showed variable wavelengths, amplitudes, and increasing vertical velocities with time.

Several of the better existing mountain wave theories were tested against the data to determine which theory or theories, if any, could explain the physical cause of the particular features of the complex wave.

It was found that existing theoretical models are too simplified to apply to the condition in the observed wave and explain only its grosser features. If our understanding of gravity waves is to be adequate to explain quantitatively what we are capable of observing quantitatively, we must begin the anlysis of more realistic models or turn to numerical integration of the relevant equations.

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Roy L. Lamberth, Ralph D. Reynolds, and Morton G. Wurtele
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