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Donald R. Cochran

stated (1975) that the ultimate measure ofa.n analysis or forecast technique is its ability to handlethe "rare" event, e.g., the explosively deepening hurri REFERENCESDvorak, V. F., 1975: Tropical cyclone intensity analysis and forecasting from satellite imagery. Mo~. Wea. Rev., 103, 42O430.Frank, N. F., 1975: Verbal-comments at the NOAA Hurricane Conference, January 1975, Miami, Fla.Gray, W. M., 1968: Global view of the origin of tropical distur bances and storms. Mon. Wea. Rev

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HENRY W. BRANDLI, JOHN W. OLIVER, and RAMON J. ESTU

and day. The Detachment 11forecast facility at Cape Kennedy, Fla., was the fhtoperational site in the world to receive and process thishighest quality, real-time, expanded, simultaneous scan-ning radiometer data. Detachment 11 uses a modifiedSTttLAWRENCE RIVERLAKE ERIELON6 ISLANDCAPE KENNEDYPOPfl 35,000'OPq 5,000 FT27" C SEA TEMP CARIBBEANFIGURE l."Geographicdy gridded simultaneous NOAA 2 scanning radiometry imagery for 1400-1423 GMT, Oct. 20, 1972.538 / Vol. 101, No. 6 / Monthly Weather

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Donald R. Cochran

winds, continuing throughthe modern work of Riehl (1954) and others, scientistshave sought to expose the geophysical mysteries of thetropics. Beginning with modest early cruises like thatof the Meteor (Von Ktihlbrodt, 1928) and continuingto the recently concluded BOMEX expedition (de laMoriniere, 1972), meteorologists have aperiodicallycollected and analyzed unique sets of discontinuous information from the data-sparse tropical oceans. Concurrently these experimenters have longed for a technique of

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FRANCES C. PARMENTER

along the north-south Absarokaand Wind River Ranges, and farther east along the BigHorn Mountains. The wind at' the top of the 12,000- and14,000-ft. mountains, indicated by LND, is 40 kt. fromthe west.Another area of wave clouds (S) can be seen along theeastern edge of the frontal cloudiness approaching Wash-ington and Oregon, in the vicinity of Mt. Adams andMt. Hood.The presence of wave clouds in satellite photographsprovides the aviation forecaster with visual informationabout the mesoscale wind

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Yarice Rodriguez, David A. R. Kristovich, and Mark R. Hjelmfelt

transportation problems at area airports and for daily commuters. Governments endure elevated costs to keep thoroughfares clear and occasionally scramble to alert citizens in the region of possible hazards ( Schmidlin 1993 ; Schmidlin and Kosarik 1999 ; Kunkel et al. 2002 ). On the other hand, snow removal companies, winter sports, and hospitality services can flourish in the wake of enhanced snowfall ( Kunkel et al. 2002 ). While forecasts of the occurrence of LE snows have steadily improved, prediction

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