Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 20 items for

  • Author or Editor: B. Haurwitz x
  • All content x
Clear All Modify Search
B. Haurwitz
Full access
B. Haurwitz
Full access
B. Haurwitz

Abstract

It is shown that perturbations forming at wind discontinuities in the atmospheres of rotating planets are unstable, even though the distribution of the angular momentum of the rotating planet exerts a stabilizing influence. Consequently disturbances can develop spontaneously. Presumably at least some of the markings observed on planets, especially on Jupiter, represent such disturbances. The velocity of these perturbations is found not to differ greatly from the mean velocity of the fluid on both sides of the boundary. Therefore, the determination of planetary velocities of rotation from visual observations of such surface markings appears justified.

At a sharp current discontinuity the amplitude of a perturbation increases faster, the shorter the wave length. At shear zones of finite width only those waves are unstable whose length is greater than five times the width of the shear zone, and those waves will develop most rapidly whose length is about eight times the width of the shear zone. Since in the large-scale atmospheric circulations different wind belts are as a rule separated by finite shear zones rather than by sharp discontinuities very short waves cannot develop because they are not unstable. An empirical check of the relation between the width of the shear zone and the length of the developing perturbations is discussed.

Full access
B. Haurwitz

Abstract

Since the sea breeze is caused by the temperature difference between the air over land and that over water, its intensity might be expected not only to increase while the temperature difference increases to its maximum but also to continue increasing until the difference decreases to zero. It is shown that in a model taking friction into account the intensity of the sea breeze begins to decrease considerably earlier, in better agreement with the observations. The diurnal rotation of the sea breeze can be explained as an effect of the Coriolis force. The observations of the diurnal variations of the sea-breeze direction made at Boston agree reasonably well with the theory, especially insofar as the modifying effects of a superimposed general wind are concerned.

Full access
L. AVERY and B. HAURWITZ

Abstract

A geographical representation of the amplitude and phase distribution of the solar semidiurnal pressure oscillation over North America shows clearly the amphidromic point expected here because of the superposition of the traveling and standing semidiurnal waves. It indicates also certain peculiarities in the phase and amplitude distribution which may be due to orographic and coastal influences. The seasonal variations of the solar semidiurnal pressure wave for the western stations are quite different from those for the stations in that central plains and in the east of the continent. Especially the total phase change throughout the year is much smaller in the west.

Full access
B. HAURWITZ and ANN D. COWLEY

Abstract

The lunar semidiurnal tide and the solar 24-, 12-, 8-, and 6-hour oscillations have been determined for the six stations Balboa, Panama; San Juan, P.R.; Aguadilla, P.R.; Burbank, Calif.; Oklahoma City, Okla.; and Greensboro, N.C.

Full access
B. HAURWITZ and ANN D. COWLEY

Abstract

The lunar semidiurnal barometric tide L 2 and the solar 24-, 12-, and 8-hr. oscillations of the surface pressure have been determined for 10 stations in Australia and on adjacent islands. At Rabaul and Moresby L 2 is considerably smaller than elsewhere in these latitudes. The characteristic annual variation of the phase—late high tide during the D season—is found at most Australian stations. But the annual amplitude minimum occurs only at half the Australian stations during this season, contrary to the behavior of L 2 over most of the globe.

Full access
B. Haurwitz and W. E. Turnbull
Full access
B. HAURWITZ and ANN D. COWLEY

Abstract

The lunar air tide and the solar 24-, 12-, 8-, and 6-hourly oscillations have been determined for Willemstad, N.W.I. and Trinidad, B.W.I. Monthly means of these oscillations have been computed for Puerto Rico.

Full access
B. Haurwitz and J. R. H. Noble
Full access