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  • Author or Editor: Fabrice Papa x
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Filipe Aires, Fabrice Papa, and Catherine Prigent

Abstract

A climatology of wetlands has been derived at a low spatial resolution (0.25° × 0.25° equal-area grid) over a 15-yr period by combining visible and near-infrared satellite observations and passive and active microwaves. The objective of this study is to develop a downscaling technique able to retrieve wetland estimations at a higher spatial resolution (about 500 m). The proposed method uses an image-processing technique applied to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) information about the low and high wetland season. This method is tested over the densely vegetated basin of the Amazon. The downscaling results are satisfactory since they respect the spatial hydrological features of the SAR data and the temporal evolution of the low-resolution wetland estimates. A new long-term and high-resolution wetland dataset has been generated for 1993–2007 for the Amazon basin. This dataset represents a new and unprecedented source of information for climate and land surface modeling of the Amazon and for the definition of future hydrology-oriented satellite missions such as Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT).

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Binh Pham-Duc, Catherine Prigent, Filipe Aires, and Fabrice Papa

Abstract

Continental surface water extents and dynamics are key information to model Earth’s hydrological and biochemical cycles. This study presents global and regional comparisons between two multisatellite surface water extent datasets, the Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS) and the Surface Water Microwave Product Series (SWAMPS), for the 1993–2007 period, along with two widely used static inundation datasets, the Global Lakes and Wetlands Database (GLWD) and the Matthews and Fung wetland estimates. Maximum surface water extents derived from these datasets are largely different: ~13 × 106 km2 from GLWD, ~5.3 × 106 km2 from Matthews and Fung, ~6.2 × 106 km2 from GIEMS, and ~10.3 × 106 km2 from SWAMPS. SWAMPS global maximum surface extent reduces by nearly 51% (to ~5 × 106 km2) when applying a coastal filter, showing a strong contamination in this retrieval over the coastal regions. Anomalous surface waters are also detected with SWAMPS over desert areas. The seasonal amplitude of the GIEMS surface waters is much larger than the SWAMPS estimates, and GIEMS dynamics is more consistent with other hydrological variables such as the river discharge. Over the Amazon basin, GIEMS and SWAMPS show a very high time series correlation (95%), but with SWAMPS maximum extent half the size of that from GIEMS and from previous synthetic aperture radar estimates. Over the Niger basin, SWAMPS seasonal cycle is out of phase with both GIEMS and MODIS-derived water extent estimates, as well as with river discharge data.

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Filipe Aires, Fabrice Papa, Catherine Prigent, Jean-François Crétaux, and Muriel Berge-Nguyen

Abstract

The objective in this work is to develop downscaling methodologies to obtain a long time record of inundation extent at high spatial resolution based on the existing low spatial resolution results of the Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS) dataset. In semiarid regions, high-spatial-resolution a priori information can be provided by visible and infrared observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The study concentrates on the Inner Niger Delta where MODIS-derived inundation extent has been estimated at a 500-m resolution. The space–time variability is first analyzed using a principal component analysis (PCA). This is particularly effective to understand the inundation variability, interpolate in time, or fill in missing values. Two innovative methods are developed (linear regression and matrix inversion) both based on the PCA representation. These GIEMS downscaling techniques have been calibrated using the 500-m MODIS data. The downscaled fields show the expected space–time behaviors from MODIS. A 20-yr dataset of the inundation extent at 500 m is derived from this analysis for the Inner Niger Delta. The methods are very general and may be applied to many basins and to other variables than inundation, provided enough a priori high-spatial-resolution information is available. The derived high-spatial-resolution dataset will be used in the framework of the Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission to develop and test the instrument simulator as well as to select the calibration validation sites (with high space–time inundation variability). In addition, once SWOT observations are available, the downscaled methodology will be calibrated on them in order to downscale the GIEMS datasets and to extend the SWOT benefits back in time to 1993.

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Augusto C. V. Getirana, Aaron Boone, Dai Yamazaki, Bertrand Decharme, Fabrice Papa, and Nelly Mognard

Abstract

Recent advances in global flow routing schemes have shown the importance of using high-resolution topography for representing floodplain inundation dynamics more reliably. This study presents and evaluates the Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP), which is a global flow routing scheme specifically designed to bridge the gap between current state-of-the-art global flow routing schemes by combining their main features and introducing new features to better capture floodplain dynamics. The ultimate goals of HyMAP are to provide the scientific community with a novel scheme suited to the assimilation of satellite altimetry data for global water discharge forecasts and a model that can be potentially coupled with atmospheric models. In this first model evaluation, HyMAP is coupled with the Interactions between Soil–Biosphere–Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model in order to simulate the surface water dynamics in the Amazon basin. The model is evaluated over the 1986–2006 period against an unprecedented source of information, including in situ and satellite-based datasets of water discharge and level, flow velocity, and floodplain extent. Results show that the model can satisfactorily simulate the large-scale features of the water surface dynamics of the Amazon River basin. Among all stream gauges considered, 23% have Nash–Sutcliffe coefficients (NS) higher than 0.50 and 68% above zero. About 28% of the stations have volume errors lower than 15%. Simulated discharges at Óbidos had NS = 0.89. Time series of simulated floodplains at the basin scale agrees well with satellite-based estimates, with a relative error of 7% and correlation of 0.89. These results indicate nonnegligible improvements in comparison to previous studies for the same region.

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Filipe Aires, Léo Miolane, Catherine Prigent, Binh Pham, Etienne Fluet-Chouinard, Bernhard Lehner, and Fabrice Papa

Abstract

A new procedure is introduced to downscale low-spatial-resolution inundation extents from Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellites (GIEMS) to a 3-arc-s (90 m) dataset (known as GIEMS-D3). The methodology is based on topography and hydrography information from the HydroSHEDS database. A new floodability index is introduced and an innovative smoothing procedure is developed to ensure a smooth transition, in the high-resolution maps, between the low-resolution boxes from GIEMS. Topography information is pertinent for natural hydrology environments controlled by elevation but is more limited in human-modified basins. However, the proposed downscaling approach is compatible with forthcoming fusion of other, more pertinent satellite information in these difficult regions. The resulting GIEMS-D3 database is the only high-spatial-resolution inundation database available globally at a monthly time scale over the 1993–2007 period. GIEMS-D3 is assessed by analyzing its spatial and temporal variability and evaluated by comparisons to other independent satellite observations from visible (Google Earth and Landsat), infrared (MODIS), and active microwave (synthetic aperture radar).

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