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James R. Scoggins, Joe Arellano Jr., Bernard Esposito, G. Alan Johnson, and Kenneth C. Brundidge
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William W. Kellogg, David Atlas, David S. Johnson, Richard J. Reed, and Kenneth C. Spengler
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Brian A. Colle, Rosemary Auld, Kenneth Johnson, Christine O’Connell, Temis G. Taylor, and Joshua Rice

Abstract

It is challenging to communicate uncertainty for high-impact weather events to the public and decision makers. As a result, there is an increased emphasis and training within the National Weather Service (NWS) for “impact-based decision support.” A Collaborative Science, Technology, And Research (CSTAR) project led by Stony Brook University (SBU) in collaboration with the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, several NWS forecast offices, and NWS operational centers held two workshops at SBU on effective forecast communication of probabilistic information for high-impact weather. Trainers in two 1.5-day workshops helped 15-20 forecasters learn to distill their messages, engage audiences, and more effectively communicate risk and uncertainty to decision makers, media, and the general public. The novel aspect of the first workshop focused on using improvisational techniques to connect with audiences along with exercises to improve communication skills using short, clear, conversational statements. The same forecasters participated in the second workshop, which focused on matching messages to intended audiences and stakeholder interaction. Using a recent high-impact weather event, representatives in emergency management, TV media, departments of transportation, and emergency services provided feedback on the forecaster oral presentations (2-3 minute) and a visual slide. This article describes our innovative workshop approach, illustrates some of the techniques used, and highlights participant feedback.

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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, Donald R. Johnson, Robert T. Ryan, William D. Bonner, James R. Mahoney, Kristina B. Katsaros, Ronald D. McPherson, Richard E. Hallgren, and Kenneth C. Spengler
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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, Warren M. Washington, David D. Houghton, Robert T. Ryan, Donald R. Johnson, Margaret A. LeMone, Alexander E. MacDonald, Richard E. Hallgren, and Kenneth C. Spengler
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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, William D. Bonner, Donald R. Johnson, James R. Mahoney, Joanne Simpson, Kristina B. Katsaros, Robert J. Serafin, Richard E. Hallgren, and Kenneth C. Spengler
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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, Robert T. Ryan, Warren M. Washington, Donald R. Johnson, William D. Bonner, Margaret A. LeMone, Ronald D. McPherson, Richard E. Hallgren, and Kenneth C. Spengler
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Paul Poli, Dick P. Dee, Roger Saunders, Viju O. John, Peter Rayer, Jörg Schulz, Kenneth Holmlund, Dorothee Coppens, Dieter Klaes, James E. Johnson, Asghar E. Esfandiari, Irina V. Gerasimov, Emily B. Zamkoff, Atheer F. Al-Jazrawi, David Santek, Mirko Albani, Pascal Brunel, Karsten Fennig, Marc Schröder, Shinya Kobayashi, Dieter Oertel, Wolfgang Döhler, Dietrich Spänkuch, and Stephan Bojinski

Abstract

To better understand the impacts of climate change, environmental monitoring capabilities must be enhanced by deploying additional and more accurate satellite- and ground-based (including in situ) sensors. In addition, reanalysis of observations collected decades ago but long forgotten can unlock precious information about the recent past. Historical, in situ observations mainly cover densely inhabited areas and frequently traveled routes. In contrast, large selections of early meteorological satellite data, waiting to be exploited today, provide information about remote areas unavailable from any other source. When initially collected, these satellite data posed great challenges to transmission and archiving facilities. As a result, data access was limited to the main teams of scientific investigators associated with the instruments. As archive media have aged, so have the mission scientists and other pioneers of satellite meteorology, who sometimes retired in possession of unique and unpublished information.

This paper presents examples of recently recovered satellite data records, including satellite imagery, early infrared hyperspectral soundings, and early microwave humidity soundings. Their value for climate applications today can be realized using methods and techniques that were not yet available when the data were first collected, including efficient and accurate observation simulators and data assimilation into reanalyses. Modern technical infrastructure allows serving entire mission datasets online, enabling easy access and exploration by a broad range of users, including new and old generations of climate scientists.

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Molly Baringer, Mariana B. Bif, Tim Boyer, Seth M. Bushinsky, Brendan R. Carter, Ivona Cetinić, Don P. Chambers, Lijing Cheng, Sanai Chiba, Minhan Dai, Catia M. Domingues, Shenfu Dong, Andrea J. Fassbender, Richard A. Feely, Eleanor Frajka-Williams, Bryan A. Franz, John Gilson, Gustavo Goni, Benjamin D. Hamlington, Zeng-Zhen Hu, Boyin Huang, Masayoshi Ishii, Svetlana Jevrejeva, William E. Johns, Gregory C. Johnson, Kenneth S. Johnson, John Kennedy, Marion Kersalé, Rachel E. Killick, Peter Landschützer, Matthias Lankhorst, Tong Lee, Eric Leuliette, Feili Li, Eric Lindstrom, Ricardo Locarnini, Susan Lozier, John M. Lyman, John J. Marra, Christopher S. Meinen, Mark A. Merrifield, Gary T. Mitchum, Ben Moat, Didier Monselesan, R. Steven Nerem, Renellys C. Perez, Sarah G. Purkey, Darren Rayner, James Reagan, Nicholas Rome, Alejandra Sanchez-Franks, Claudia Schmid, Joel P. Scott, Uwe Send, David A. Siegel, David A. Smeed, Sabrina Speich, Paul W. Stackhouse Jr., William Sweet, Yuichiro Takeshita, Philip R. Thompson, Joaquin A. Triñanes, Martin Visbeck, Denis L. Volkov, Rik Wanninkhof, Robert A. Weller, Toby K. Westberry, Matthew J. Widlansky, Susan E. Wijffels, Anne C. Wilber, Lisan Yu, Weidong Yu, and Huai-Min Zhang
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