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04 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW. FEBRUARY, 1918result of this gorge traffic was suspended on the Juniata highway bridge which crosses the Juniata River near its mouth to Duncans Irland, and also on the covered highway bridge at Clarks Ferry, which spans the Susquehanna from Duncans Island to the eavtern shore. lhe Che- mung ice broke at Corning about 3 a. m. of the 13th and moved slowly down the river, forming ice jams, which broke as the water accumu- lated behind them, re-formed and broke again

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Jason M. Cordeira, F. Martin Ralph, Andrew Martin, Natalie Gaggini, J. Ryan Spackman, Paul J. Neiman, Jonathan J. Rutz, and Roger Pierce

BACKGROUND. What is an atmospheric river? Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are broadly defined as long and narrow corridors of strong water vapor transport that are characterized by enhanced vertically integrated water vapor (IWV) and enhanced IWV transport (IVT) (e.g., Ralph et al. 2004 ; Neiman et al. 2008 ). The IWV and IVT corridors associated with ARs are typically >2,000 km long and 500–1,000 km wide, and they often represent areas of instantaneous poleward and lateral moisture transport in the

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04 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW. FEBRUARY, 1918result of this gorge traffic was suspended on the Juniata highway bridge which crosses the Juniata River near its mouth to Duncans Irland, and also on the covered highway bridge at Clarks Ferry, which spans the Susquehanna from Duncans Island to the eavtern shore. lhe Che- mung ice broke at Corning about 3 a. m. of the 13th and moved slowly down the river, forming ice jams, which broke as the water accumu- lated behind them, re-formed and broke again

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. 71 or iiormd.A general view of the results of obseriutioiis of thc wntcr in tlle rivers is given inIn :d c l i r ion to this t;tblc, thc followiiig ~t ~i i ~~l t ~ otilyarc 11cccss:wy. The hlissouri fell;llnlost contiriiiously, cscept a t Leavenwoith, where it rose during tlie first week of July-r 1 l C upper Mississippi has declined soin cwliiit ; the middle port)ion of the river was atilTst stationary or slightly rising, aqd theiibegan to fdl steadily ; the l o m r portion of therlVcr, after

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Erick R. Rivera, Francina Dominguez, and Christopher L. Castro

1. Introduction Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are filamentary water vapor fluxes that cover about 10% of the globe and are responsible for most of the meridional water vapor transport in the extratropical atmosphere ( Zhu and Newell 1998 ). These features are typically located in the warm sector of major extratropical cyclones where a pre-cold-front low-level jet is present ( Ralph et al. 2004 , 2005 , 2006 ; Neiman et al. 2008 ; Dettinger et al. 2011 ; Ralph and Dettinger 2011 ). Generally

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_________ __ ._ ________ ___________ Land area. __ __________ __ __. __ ____.__. . __ __.Tntal watershed .._._._._._.___._...- .163.9 1 Y.G? 1 9.02 1.1561 8.71 . 5.23 --I-1.320 I 8 .8 1 5.73 ISccond- feet172.5 3. li469.5 9.2 1,529.5 401.5 5.2 0.0 12. 7 20.40.02. 624.1 -1,730.0 6%. 1 .MR. 31, 5lN. 4350.5 1,349.9 406.7- ... _. ...Per- centage, run-ori--100 w65RIVER REGULATION[Regulation of Rivers without Embankments, BS Appllcd In the Tralnlng Works, a! the Eeadwaters of the Rangoon Rlver, Burma (locally known as the Myltrnaka Training

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Gerhard Smiatek and Harald Kunstmann

-CORDEX initiative employed in a hydrology model (HM) allow reproducing the observed flow duration curves (FDCs) at various gauges of a river located in the Alpine and pre-Alpine area, and what changes in the river flow can be expected under future climate conditions. The exemplarily chosen investigated catchment is, at 600 km 2 , typical for an Alpine and pre-Alpine headwater catchment. With its complex terrain, fast propagation of the precipitated water into the high streamflows, and susceptibility to flooding

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Qian Cao, Ali Mehran, F. Martin Ralph, and Dennis P. Lettenmaier

1. Introduction A body of work over the last decade or so has demonstrated that most major floods along the U.S. West Coast are attributable to atmospheric rivers (ARs; e.g., Ralph et al. 2006 ; Dettinger et al. 2011 ; Neiman et al. 2011 ; Barth et al. 2017 ), which are long, narrow, and transient corridors of anomalously strong horizontal water vapor transport ( Zhu and Newell 1998 ; Ralph et al. 2018 ). Accompanied by warm air temperatures and strong low-level winds, AR landfalls may

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Ervin Zsótér, Florian Pappenberger, Paul Smith, Rebecca Elizabeth Emerton, Emanuel Dutra, Fredrik Wetterhall, David Richardson, Konrad Bogner, and Gianpaolo Balsamo

multimodel forecasting and have focused on individual catchments. The potential of multimodel forecasts at the regional or continental scale shown in previous studies provides the motivation for building a global multimodel hydrometeorological forecasting system. In this study we present our experiences in building a multimodel hydrometeorological forecasting system. Global ensemble discharge forecasts with a 10-day horizon are generated using the ECMWF land surface model and a river-routing model. The

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Hotaek Park, Yasuhiro Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro Oshima, Youngwook Kim, Thanh Ngo-Duc, John S. Kimball, and Daqing Yang

1. Introduction Arctic river ice is one of the major components of the global cryosphere and has a distinctive seasonal phenology characterized by freezeup and growth during fall and winter, followed by breakup with the onset of spring thawing and the seasonal flood pulse. This seasonality is closely related to atmospheric heat fluxes. Arctic warming that was significant over the past several decades ( Bekryaev et al. 2010 ) has resulted in changes in seasonal river ice phenology, characterized

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