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David L. T. Anderson and Julian P. McCreary Jr.

edgeof ocean 2, and establishes a region of warm temperature near x = 30 000 km. A similar eastward propagation then proceeds in ocean 1, and the oscillationcontinues in this manner. Although the oceans are not physically connectedin any way, there is a connection via the atmosphericwind field. When a warm patch approaches the easternedge of ocean 1, say, the easterly wind field to the eastof the warm patch extends over the western part ofocean 2, depressing the thermocline in the west

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Eric B. Kraus and Lynn D. Leslie

causal effect onoceanic conditions downstream or on the global climate is not known at present. As indicated by themodel described in this paper, lhe extent of the stratusappears to be related to the strength of the tradewindcirculation; therefore, it may provide an easily observable index for that circulation. Fig. I suggests an ocean heating ~momaly of 2040 W m-2 below the subtropical cloud decks. Allowing for a mixed layer advective velocity of 5 cm s-i,and a stratus extent of the order of 1000

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Christoph Schär

-1921.Mclntyre, M. E., and W. A. Norton, 1990: Dissipative wave-mean interaction and the transport of vorticity or potential vorticity. J. Fluid Mech., 212, 403-435.Marshall, J. C., and A. J. G. Nurser, 1992: Fluid dynamics of oceanic thermocline ventilation. J. Phys. Oceanogr., 22, 583-595.Palmer, T. N., G. J. Shutts, and R. Swinbank, 1986: Alleviation of a systematic westerly bias in general circulation and numerical weather prediction models through an orographic gravity wave drag

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Peter H. Stone

ratio. It is assumed that the motion is driven by applying a periodic heat flux to the horizontalboundaries. Solutions are first found for a non-rotating system in which nonlinear effects are small, butnot zero. The solutions show that if the fluid is heated from above, the meridional circulation tends to beconcentrated near the upper boundary at the point where the cooling is a maximum; when the fluid isheated from below the meridional circulation tends to be concentrated near the lower boundary at

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G. P. Williams

: An advective model of the ocean thermocline. Tellus, 11, 309-318.Williams, G. P., 1975a: Some ocean-Jupiter connections. Mode News, 78, 1-4. , 1975b: Jupiter's atmospheric circulation. Nature, 257, 778. , 1978: Planetary circulations: 1. Barotropic representation of Jovian and terrestrial turbulence. J. Atmo& Sci., 35, 1399-1426. , 1979: Planetary circulations: 2. The Jovian quasi-geostrophic regime. J. Atmos. Sci., 36, 932-968. , 1985a: Geostrophic regimes on a sphere and a beta

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Heng Xiao and Carlos R. Mechoso

–global atmosphere coupled general circulation model. Part II: Interannual variability and its relation to the seasonal cycle. Climate Dyn. , 15 , 63 – 80 . Wang , B. , R. Wu , and R. Lukas , 1999 : Roles of the western North Pacific wind variation in thermocline adjustment and ENSO phase transition. J. Meteor. Soc. Japan , 77 , 1 – 16 . Xiao , H. , 2008 : A GCM study of ENSO and its relationship with the seasonal cycle. Ph.D. dissertation, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences

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Xiouhua Fu, Bin Wang, Tim Li, and Julian P. McCreary

-scale MJO couples with a northward-propagating divergence wave, thereby modulating the Indian monsoon active (break) spells. Chen et al. (1988) suggested that the MJO couples with and steers northward low-level, 30–50-day monsoon troughs and ridges that originate near the equator through a transient local Hadley circulation ( Yasunari 1981 ); this steering in turn induces active (break) cycles of the Indian summer monsoon. Lau and Chan (1986) argued that the northward propagation results from the

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G. P. Williams

1. Introduction We continue the presentation begun in Williams (1996 , hereafter Part I) and extended in Williams (2002 , hereafter Part II) of solutions to a primitive equation model that examine dynamical processes thought to be relevant to the global circulations of the Jovian atmospheres. Here, the main concern is with generating the multiple jet streams and an equatorial superrotation of the form and scale seen on Jupiter and Saturn. In addressing this problem, we again explore the

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Malte Jansen and Raffaele Ferrari

1. Introduction The response of the atmosphere and ocean circulations to changes in the external forcing is a crucial question for studies of climate and climate change. A major difficulty in answering this question is that the response of the mean circulation is strongly affected by changes in the macroturbulence in the two fluids. Heuristic arguments have been put forward to predict the turbulent adjustment to changes in the external forcing, both for the atmosphere and the ocean

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Ralph F. Milliff and Jan Morzel

1. Introduction Wind stress curl is the principal source of relative vorticity in theories of the wind-driven general circulation of the World Ocean (e.g., see the first few chapters of Pedlosky 1996 ). Away from western boundaries, the Sverdrup balance can be used to derive a transport streamfunction at a point that is proportional to the line integral of the wind stress curl, along a line of latitude starting from the eastern boundary of an ocean basin and ending at the point in question. In

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