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CLAYTON E. JENSEN, JAY S. WINSTON, and V. RAY TAYLOR

November 1966Clayton E. Jensen, Jay S. Winston, and V. Ray Taylor641 SOO-MB. HEIGHTSAS A LINEAR FUNCTION OF SATELLITE INFRARED RADIATION DATA CLAYTON E. JENSEN,* JAY S. WINSTON, and V. RAY TAYLORNational Environmental Satellite Center, Environmental Science Services Administration, Washington, D.C. ABSTRACTThe technique of stepwisc multiple regression is applied to 45 days of data in establishing functional relationsbetween the heights of the 500-mb

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J. F. TRISTAN and G. MICHAUD

suns heat can only occur in thoso salt seas in which the up er layerspermanent diffusion process.-A. E. &umett].conditions of thc warming process, anc Q some experi-increase in concentration in come uence o P a noreABSORPTION OF ULTRA-VIOLET AND INFRA-RED RADIATIONS BY ARABLE S0IL.OBy J. F. TRISTAN and G. MICHAUD.[ReprintrdJrom Science Abstracts, See. A, Aug. 30,1915,o 952.1Photographs were taken in ultra-violet light through aquartz lens, silvered after Liebig, which is transparent to hght of

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PHILIP F. CLAPP

JULY 1962 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW 287CorrespondenceCOMMENTS O N "ANALYSIS OF SATELLITE INFRARED RADIATION MEASUREMENTS ONA SYNOPTIC SCALE" AND "SYNOPTIC USE OF RADIATION MEASUREMENTS FROMSATELLITE TIROS 11"PHILIP F. CLAPPExtended Forecast Branch, US. Weather Bureau, Washington, D.C.February 28, 1962; revlsed April 18, 1962Two recent papers [I], [Z] revctd quite clearly a closerelationship between cloud cover and outgoing long-wnveradiation to space from the earth-tttmospllere system, inthe sense

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P. M. KUHN, V. E. SUOMI, and G. L. DARKOW

20304050607080901 0 01 5 0200Y Ea2503003350 Q4 0 0 . E500600700800900l o 0 0IO50ascents. Cooling was then c o m p u t e d f r o m t h e s e r e s u l t s CLEAR SUMMERproviding a mean rert.ica1 distribution of the terrestrial The 12 summer flights, reaching a mean height of 75 mb., radiation and its divergence. h simple computation, furnish a representative mid-latitude average of the rerti-average cooling is compared with Miiller's [4] indirectestimate of the mean mid-latitude annual infrared cooling

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ALAN E. STRONG, E. PAUL McCLAIN, and DAVID F. McGlNNlS

828 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW Vol. 99, No. 11UDC 551.5?1.14:651.507.362.2:551.5i9.2:556.124:535-1"196~.04.25"DETECTION OF THAWING SNOW AND ICE PACKS THROUGH THE COMBINED USEOF VISIBLE AND NEAR-INFRARED MEASUREMENTS FROM EARTH SATELLITESALAN E. STRONG, E. PAUL McCLAIN, and DAVID F. McGlNNlSNational Environmental Satellite Service, NOAA, Washington, D.C.1, INTRODUCTIONHydrologic information from earth satellites has beenincreased by the addition to the Kimbus 3 meteorologicalsatellite of

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ERIC R. MILLER

) internal reflection of light from glass cover to grids; (4) s e g t i v e absorption by cover glaea of ultra-violet and infra-red radiation from sun. and total absorption of radiation from grids; (5) grid surfaces not geometrical planes; (6, lag of registration behind radiation.The data in the accompanyin paper on Measure-Callendar pyrheliometer are entirely uncorrected for instrumental error. Whilc such data niay be used forcomparison with ,data obtained with the same type of instrument elsewhere, it

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STEPHEN K. COX and STEFAN L. HASTENRATH

November 1970823UDC 51.521.32(968.2)RADIATION MEASUREMENTS OVER THE EQUATORIAL CENTRAL PACIFICSTEPHEN K. COX* and STEFAN L. HASTENRATH The University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis.ABSTRACTDuring the Line Islands Experiment in spring 1967, surface shortwave and net radiation was continuously re-corded at Palmyra, and Snomi-Kuhn infrared radiationsondes were released daily at the islands of Palmyra, (.5"53'N., 162'05' W.) and Christmas (1'39' N., 157'22' W.) as part of an extensive surface and

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DONALD R. JOHNSON and WILLIAM C. SHEN

,along a line from International Falls, Minn., to Willemstad, Curacao. The profiles of irradiance and infrared coolingdetermined from filtered radiometersonde measurements clearly portray the influence of clouds. Variations of infraredirradiance and cooling associated with the zonal, secondary, and convective scales are discussed. Primarily attentionis focused on radiation features associated with the jet stream and its associated cloud distribution. The contrastbetween profiles of net irradiance and

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SIGMUND FRITZ and JAY S. WINSTON

dcrived. I n cases where there is a low overcast, the window measurements in themselves may not dis-tinguish clouds from clear arcas; but during daytime if television pictures are available, the window measurementscan clearly show where a cloud overcast is low in height. Some tentative conclusions about the partial t'ransparencyof cirrus clouds t o infrared radiation are also presented.1. INTRODUCTIONTIROY I produced thousands of excellent' photographsof cloudiness on mmy scales (e.g., [I, 2 , 31

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P. M. KUHN

radiometer (right).Cross hatching indicates blackened aluminum sensing surface;RL is infrared radiation current; black dots are temperaturesensors; subscripted T's refer t o polyethylene, air, top, andbottom temperatures; upper case P's t o polyethylene ventilationshields.AUGUST 1961 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW 287TABLE 2.-Comparison of total radiation computed from equalion(7 ) for standard radiometersonde and from equation (6 ) f o r "disc"radiometersondePressure (mb.)_____-900. ...............m

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