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  • Planetary waves x
  • DYNAMO/CINDY/AMIE/LASP: Processes, Dynamics, and Prediction of MJO Initiation x
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Samson M. Hagos, Zhe Feng, Casey D. Burleyson, Chun Zhao, Matus N. Martini, and Larry K. Berg

precipitation associated with the two MJO episodes varies significantly from simulation to simulation. The CPM ( Fig. 2b ) captures the eastward propagation, but precipitation is generally overestimated during both the active and suppressed phases of the MJO. The simulation with the SAS cumulus scheme ( Fig. 2d ) also captures the eastward-propagating waves, and, in agreement with the observations, its precipitation during the suppressed phase is quite weak. The eastward propagations in the WRF simulations

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Kacie E. Hoover, John R. Mecikalski, Timothy J. Lang, Xuanli Li, Tyler J. Castillo, and Themis Chronis

of 5 m s −1 ( Weickmann et al. 1985 ; Knutson et al. 1986 ). It has a planetary mode of 30–90 days and influences both daily weather and climatological patterns, which makes it the dominant intraseasonal variability across the tropics ( Zhang 2005 ). The convective signal of the oscillation is associated with enhanced evaporation, cloudiness, and rainfall. The MJO typically initiates and tracks from a source region in the Indian Ocean, and decays as it reaches the western and central Pacific

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Simon P. de Szoeke, Eric D. Skyllingstad, Paquita Zuidema, and Arunchandra S. Chandra

capable of accelerating the air downward, forming a downdraft. Continued evaporative cooling and moistening by rain keeps the downdraft nearly saturated when it reaches the planetary boundary layer (BL), where it spreads horizontally along the surface in a cold pool ( Zipser 1977 ). Cold pools have become a topic of renewed fascination because of their potential role in assisting the shallow-to-deep convective transition (e.g., Rowe and Houze 2015 ) and to correct erroneous convective diurnal cycles

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