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H. C. FRANKENFIELD

168 MONTHLY WEA-THER REVIEW.WEATHER OF THE MONTH.WEATHER OF NORTH AMERICA AND ADJACENT OCEANS.OENERAL PRESSURE CONDITIONS.B y H. C. FRANKENFIELD. Supervising Forecaster.North Pa& c Ocean.-At Midway Island pressure wasmonth, and moderately high, as a rule, during the third week, while thereafter it averaged somewhat low. AtHonolulu pressure was high during the first decade of the month, and generally below normal thereafter. ressure prevailed during the first fivedays of t,he montr, and

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A. J. HENRY

660 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW. SEPTEMBER, 1919WEATHER OF THE MONTH.WEATHER OF NORTH AMERICA AND ADJACENT OCEANS.GENERAL CONDITIONS.By A. J. IIYNKT. Mrteorcjlcgist.In Srp tcmlicr in thc Nort,hc.i-n Hcmisphern the liaro- metric grnr1iciit.s arc h e wcnkcat, of the year nni.1 t⟩he con- trol of t,he sui.fnce winrls is 1e:st pronouiicd "lie :z:'enof mnximum pressure st.ill oi-c:.lies t,he miildle portion of tlio North At,lsiitk i d l i n \\-l?stivn.d cst,ensinn into the eastxwi hxlf of the h

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H. C. FRANKENFIELD

WY, 1920. MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW. 293probable that the presence of this high pressure was responsible for the unusual aniount of fog reported by vesseJs on the northern steamer route, as well as for the dense cloudiness frequently experienced.NORTH AMERICA.By H. C. FRANKENFIELD, Supervising Forecaster.As indicated in the general discussion above, immuredistribution during the month of May was not of decisive character. On the whole, pressure somewhat above normal prevailed, with resulting low

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A. J. HENRY

122 . MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW. FEBRUARY, 1919NORTH AMERICA.By A. J. HENRY, Meteorologist.In the United States and adjacent p ~t s of Cunnda and Mexico the nionth, as n whole, was of tlie mild t lie ofclianges to cold weather characteristic of the month. The present winter, therefore, stands in sharp contrcist to thnt of the preceding J-ear. The obvious esplmait~ionsmns t.o he tliitt the rid⟨ye of high res sure in cold wint,ers that joins the Siberian ?High to t i e Coli t.iiientu1 High of

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EDWARD H. BOWIE

MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW. 45WEATHER OF THE MONTH.WEATHER OF NORTH AMERICA AND ADJACENT OCEANS.GENEBAL CONDITIONS.By A. J. HENRY, 3leteomlogist.Before esaniining in detail the weather of the current month, let us consider for a moment the eneral averagehere. In that nionth pressure is high over the niiddlc ratitudes of the continents and low in the Arctic region and the northern portions of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Pressme IS hi hest over east-central Asia andGulf of Alaska. In the higher

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ELFORD G. ASTLING and LYLE H. HORN

. ,. ._UDC ~1.611.6:~1.61~.1(T)"1~4"Atmospheric Energy Transport Over North AmericaFor Three Winter MonthsELFORD G. ASTLING-Department of Meteorology, Florida State University,Tallahassee, Fla.LYLE H. HORN-Department of Meteorology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, W~S.ABSTRACT-The excellent North American radiosondenetwork is used to calculate the poleward energy transportfor the continental area during the period January-March1966. The transport of sensible and latent heat and geo

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Clayton H. Reitan

circu.lation. Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc., 103, 441-456.Rosen, R. D., D. A. Salstein and 3. P. Peixoto, 1979: Variability in the annual fields of large-scale atmospheric water vapor transport. Mon. Wea. Rev., 107, 26-37.Trends in the Frequencies of Cyclone Activity over North America CLAYTON H. REITANDepartment of Geography, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb 6011511 September 1978 and 20 August 1979ABSTRACT Trends in cyclone frequencies over North America were determined for the

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Kevin M. Grise, Seok-Woo Son, and John R. Gyakum

extratropical cyclones track are referred to as storm tracks. The location of the storm tracks is largely governed by the locations of the climatological-mean horizontal temperature gradients (e.g., land–ocean boundaries) and the background stationary wave pattern forced by remote orography and diabatic heating (e.g., Chang et al. 2002 ; Gerber and Vallis 2009 ; Son et al. 2009 ). Over North America, the storm tracks extend eastward from the lee of the Rocky Mountains toward the Great Lakes and parallel

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Ronald L. Holle and Martin J. Murphy

1. Introduction Convection in the North American monsoon has been studied with incomplete spatial and temporal coverage because of the rugged terrain that makes direct measurements difficult to obtain. To date, convection in this region has been mostly inferred from relatively low-resolution or sparse data. For example, Douglas et al. (1993 , their Fig. 7) illustrated a broad maximum in convection that peaks during July and August over the western portion of Mexico using infrared cloud

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Jay R. Harman

2840 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW VOLUME 115 NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Mean Monthly North American Anticyclone Frequencies, 1950-79 JAY R. HARMAN Department of Geography, Michigan State University, East Lansing, M148824 3 October 1986 and 18 April 1987 ABSTRACT Monthly North American anticyclone climatology for the period 1950-79 is examined

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