Search Results

You are looking at 51 - 60 of 194 items for :

  • Infrared radiation x
  • Journal of Physical Oceanography x
  • All content x
Clear All
Richard V. Legeckis

radiation emitted by the earthin the 10.5-12.5 /am (thermal infrared) and theMAY 1979 RICHARD V. LEGECKIS 48540301975~ r"'N D ' S O N D J F MAMJ IJ F M A MI976 I 1977 FIG. 2. The histogram shows the number of monthly VHRR/IR observations of the Gulf Streamsouth of Cape Hatteras. An observation is included if the western boundary of the current

Full access
C. Mertens and F. Schott

components of the wind, and the air temperature. The infrared backradiation flux of the ocean is not provided with the PERIDOT outputs. It has been computed from the relation Q ir = εσ T 4 s using a mean sea surface temperature of 13.0°C. The net outgoing longwave radiation is therefore given by the difference of Q ir and the downward infrared flux from the PERIDOT data fields. Comparing PERIDOT model wind speed fields with shipboard observations from RV Valdivia in December 1991 and Poseidon

Full access
Lothar Stramma, Peter Cornillon, Robert A. Weller, James F. Price, and Melbourne G. Briscoe

temperatures using the Large and Pond( 1981) bulk aerodynamic method. The estimated windstress magnitude varied substantially, from nearly zeroon several occasions to as much as 0.25 N m-2(Fig. 2b). Insolation was directly measured by pyranometer(Fig. 2a). Heat loss, L, is the sum of infrared, sensible,and latent heat fluxes. The former was calculated fromconventional radiation formulae (Kondratyev, 1969),by which cloud cover was estimated from observedinsolation compared to the expected clear sky

Full access
Reginald E. Newell

variations in thatregion are small (NeweR, Selkirk, and Ebisuzaki, 1982).At this limiting temperature, there is a near balancebetween the incoming solar radiation and the sum ofthe net infrared radiative energy loss to the atmosphereand the evaporative energy loss, with the evaporativeloss rising steeply' with increasing temperature owingto the rise in saturation vapor pressure as expressed bythe Clausius-Clapeyron relationship (see Priestley,1966, for a discussion of the limit for a well

Full access
William E. Shenk and Vincent V. Salomonson

. Rao, R. Koflier and W. R. Curtis, 1970: The determination of sea-surface temperature from satellite high resolution infrared window radiation measurements. Mon. Wea. Rev., 98, 604-611.Warnecke, G., L. J. Allison, L. M. McMillin and K. H. Szekielda, 1971: Remote sensing of ocean currents and sea surface tem perature changes derived from the Nimbus II satellite. J. Phys. Oceangr., 1, 45-60.

Full access
George W. Kattawar and Gilbert N. Plass

. Rao, R. Koflier and W. R. Curtis, 1970: The determination of sea-surface temperature from satellite high resolution infrared window radiation measurements. Mon. Wea. Rev., 98, 604-611.Warnecke, G., L. J. Allison, L. M. McMillin and K. H. Szekielda, 1971: Remote sensing of ocean currents and sea surface tem perature changes derived from the Nimbus II satellite. J. Phys. Oceangr., 1, 45-60.

Full access
P. Flament and M. Sawyer

cross-calibration error was 3mm rms. Absolute humidity was measured by an Ophir infrared absorption hygrometer mounted in free air, andrelative humidity by a pair of Rotronics capacitancehygrometers mounted in R. M. Young aspirated radiation shields. The hygrometers were calibratedagainst General Eastern dewpoint sensors after thecruise. Wet-bulb temperatures were computed usingequations from the Smithsonian Meteorological Tables. The offset between the Rotronics wet bulbs was0.2-C, a = 0.1 -C

Full access
William Mcleish and Gerald E. Putland

.McAlister, E. D., 1964: Infrared optical techniques applied to oceanography, 1, Measurement of total heat flow from the sea surface. Appl. Opt., 3, 609-612.--, and W. McLeish, 1969: Heat transfer in the top millimeter of the ocean. J. Geophys. Res., 74, 3408-3414. , and E. A. Corduan, 1971: Airborne measurements of the total heat flux from the sea during BOMEX. J. Geophys. Res., 76, 4172-4180.McLeish, W., 1968: On the mechanisms of wind-slick generation. Deep Sea Res., 15, 461

Full access
P. S. Brown Jr., J. P. Pandolfo, and G. D. Robinson

,absorption and backward scatter expressed as representative values for the solar radiation and for theterrestrial infrared radiation. Because of the incidenceof Rayleigh scattering and the high water content ofthe tropical atmosphere, the solar wavelengths considered can reasonably be confined to the 350-1000nm range and the terrestrial wavelengths to the "window'' region, ~8.5 #m to 12.5 ~zm. The sources citedabove give the total attenuation coefficient (K), thesingle-scatter albedo (w0) and either the

Full access
L. Mahrt and Tihomir Hristov

variables is assessed in section 6 . Fig . 1. A sketch of influences, both physical (solid lines) and artificial (dashed lines), on the determination of the surface heat flux over the sea. The red lines indicate the usual approaches such as Monin–Obukhov similarity theory, the blue lines denote analysis problems, and the green lines identify additional physics not included in the usual similarity theory. 2. Measurements a. RED The Roughness and Radiation Duct experiment (RED) provides the primary

Full access