Search Results

You are looking at 61 - 70 of 5,660 items for :

  • Thermocline circulation x
  • All content x
Clear All
M. Latif, M. Collins, H. Pohlmann, and N. Keenlyside

et al. 2005 ). This dipolar pattern is associated with a clear multidecadal time scale and is probably connected to the meridional overturning circulation in the Atlantic (MOC), as shown by Latif et al. 2004 analyzing a coupled model simulation. Latif et al. (2005) show that the variations in the MOC, as expressed by a dipolar SST anomaly (SSTA) index, are driven by the low-frequency variations in the NAO and lag them by about a decade ( Fig. 4 ). The changes in the NAO drive changes in the

Full access
Florent Gasparin, Mathieu Hamon, Elisabeth Rémy, and Pierre-Yves Le Traon

dataset is mainly composed of sparse hydrographic sections repeated every decade from oceanographic ships, such as during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) in the 1900s and currently Global Ocean Ship-Based Hydrographic Investigations Program (GO-SHIP). Numerous studies based on these historical datasets have shown that deep patterns of mass and heat transports are key elements of the global circulation and its interactions with the atmosphere (e.g., Rintoul 2007 ; Purkey and Johnson

Open access
Robert C. J. Wills, Kyle C. Armour, David S. Battisti, and Dennis L. Hartmann

), drought relief in the Sahel ( Gray 1990 ; Zhang and Delworth 2006 ), and a higher frequency of landfalling Atlantic hurricanes ( Gray 1990 ; Goldenberg et al. 2001 ; Zhang and Delworth 2006 ). Multiple physical mechanisms have been put forth to explain this variability. Most studies have focused on the role of internal variability in ocean circulation, principally the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC; Delworth et al. 1993 ; Delworth and Mann 2000 ; Latif et al. 2004 ; Knight et

Full access
Tor Eldevik and Jan Even Ø. Nilsen

1. Introduction The Atlantic Ocean's thermohaline circulation (THC) carries heat and salt from the tropics to the high northern latitudes (e.g., Wunsch 2002 ; Kuhlbrodt et al. 2007 ). It is completed north of the Greenland–Scotland Ridge (GSR) that separates the Nordic Seas and Arctic Ocean—the Arctic Mediterranean—from the North Atlantic ( Fig. 1 ). The warm and saline inflow of Atlantic Water (AW) is totally transformed by atmospheric heat loss and freshwater input as it travels the Arctic

Full access
Rui Xin Huang

this study are formulating the suitable boundary value problems of the continuouslystratified thermocline equations and solving these problems numerically.1. Introduction A primary goal of large-scale ocean circulation theory has been to understand the thermocline structure.There has been a lengthy debate over the role and relative importance of advection and diffusion in determining the thermocline structure in the open ocean.In particular, the analyses of Welander (1959) andRobinson and

Full access
Rui Xin Huang

Using an ideal-fluid model, the main thermocline in the North Atlantic is reconstructed. The new feature inthe model is the use of a nonlinear background stratification calculated from the hydrographic measurementscollected on the Discovery cruise along 46-49-N. The basic stratification is assumed to be set up by an externalthermohaline circulation and modified by a wind-driven circulation superimposed upon it. The numericalresults of the model distinctly show the three-dimensional structure of the

Full access
Cara C. Henning and Geoffrey K. Vallis

1. Introduction Understanding the structure of the ocean stratification is a fundamental problem in ocean circulation dynamics, and the main thermocline is the single most obvious feature of this stratification. Yet even the simpler problem of understanding the structure of the thermocline of an idealized ocean consisting of a single, isolated basin with a single subtropical and subpolar gyre is not fully understood. The particular geography of the ocean basins and the circulation between them

Full access
Guihua Wang, Shang-Ping Xie, Rui Xin Huang, and Changlin Chen

surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), and wind changes on the ocean response with an ocean general circulation model (OGCM). Finally we use a ventilated thermocline model to interpret the ocean response and identify causes. Section 4 is a summary with discussion. 2. Methodology a. CMIP5 output Historical and representative concentration pathway 4.5 (RCP4.5) runs from 36 available models from CMIP5 ( Taylor et al. 2012 ; http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov/esgf-web-fe/ ; also see Table 1 ) are

Full access
David J. Schwab, William P. O'Connor, and George L. Mellor

GEORGE L. MELLOR Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, Princeton. New Jersey 8 April 1994 and 9 September 1994 ABSTRACT This paper proposes a possible explanation for the mean cyclonic circulation in large stratified lakes. Thecondition of no heat flux through the bottom boundary causes the isotherms to dip near the shores to intersectthe sloping bottom orthogonally, This "doming" of the thermocline causes an internal pressure gradient in

Full access
Xiao-Tong Zheng, Shang-Ping Xie, Gabriel A. Vecchi, Qinyu Liu, and Jan Hafner

statistics of decadal variability the IOD in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1) coupled general circulation model as consistent with chaotic variability, without the need for an underlying oscillation; Song et al. (2007b) found that an EEIO thermocline shoaling resulting from the closure of the Indonesian Throughflow in the GFDL CM2.1 model resulted in a large enhancement of IOD variability. As a recent example of decadal modulation, two consecutive

Full access