Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 9 of 9 items for :

  • Understanding Diurnal Variability of Precipitation through Observations and Models (UDVPOM) x
  • All content x
Clear All
Alex C. Ruane and John O. Roads

model’s atmosphere is forced by weekly mean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) that are linearly interpolated into mean daily values, resulting in diurnally constant SSTs. This assumption stems from the fact that the open-ocean surface’s large heat capacity drastically diminishes the daily range of surface temperature compared to land. Diurnally constant SSTs therefore have only a small impact on the diurnal magnitude of turbulent energy fluxes, but the phases are strongly affected ( RR07a ). b. Water

Full access
R. Cifelli, S. W. Nesbitt, S. A. Rutledge, W. A. Petersen, and S. Yuter

background properties [e.g., sea surface temperature (SST), air temperature, mixing ratio, and wind speed] as well as sensible and latent heat fluxes at the TEPPS and EPIC locations. For the EPIC and TEPPS buoys, SST was measured at a depth of 1 m, and air temperature, wind, and relative humidity were measured at 3–4 m (see http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/proj_over/mooring.shtml ). The calculation of surface fluxes from the TAO buoy data is described in Cronin et al. (2006) . TRMM satellite data were also

Full access
J. Li, S. Sorooshian, W. Higgins, X. Gao, B. Imam, and K. Hsu

.e., near-surface air vertical motion), Luo and Yanai (1983) provided a theoretical explanation in the Tibetan region and Ciesielski and Johnson (2008) used this framework in their study of the SMO region. In this paper we suggest that the higher-resolution model better captures the contribution of surface heating to the variations of the meteorological fields, such as convection. Diurnal variations of the difference in mean surface sensible heat flux ( Fig. 7 , top) and latent heat flux ( Fig. 7

Full access
T. N. Krishnamurti, C. Gnanaseelan, A. K. Mishra, and A. Chakraborty

on the use of diverse physical parameterization within a suite of multimodels was reported in Krishnamurti et al. (2008) . Here several planetary boundary layer algorithms constituted the difference among the member models of a multimodel suite. The goal of this study was to examine the possible improvements in the planetary boundary layer fluxes of latent heat that can be achieved from our approach. This study requires an observational benchmark for the latent heat fluxes. Those were obtained

Full access
Song Yang and Eric A. Smith

the smooth daily cycle of incoming solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere occur in many atmospheric quantities including winds, surface pressure, vertical motion, cloudiness, and surface radiation fluxes as a selection of important variables—but most importantly precipitation. Studies on diurnal precipitation variability have been going on regularly since a seminal study that took place in 1901. However, until recently, observationally based precipitation studies had long been plagued by

Full access
Arindam Chakraborty and T. N. Krishnamurti

1. Introduction The diurnal cycle contributes to a large modulation of the time-mean energy budget of the earth–atmosphere system. Bergman and Salby (1997) , from radiative transfer calculations, showed that large errors can occur in the estimation of TOA (a list of acronyms is provided in Table 1 ) shortwave (∼20 W m −2 ) and longwave fluxes (∼5 W m −2 ) if the diurnal cycle is not taken into account. Chakraborty et al. (2007) showed that improvements in the diurnal cycle of low, middle

Full access
Tianjun Zhou, Rucong Yu, Haoming Chen, Aiguo Dai, and Yang Pan

. 2007 ), these precipitation characteristics significantly modulate soil moisture, runoff, evaporation, and sensible heat flux over land ( Qian et al. 2006 ). They also provide an excellent test bed for validating cumulus and other parameterizations in numerical weather and climate models, which still have large deficiencies in simulating the diurnal timing, frequency, and intensity of precipitation (e.g., Dai et al. 1999 ; Lin et al. 2000 ; Yang and Slingo 2001 ; Betts and Jakob 2002 ; Dai and

Full access
Song Yang and Eric A. Smith

). Lin et al. (2000) reported that diurnal phasing in the Randall GCM is very sensitive to a specified parameter that links cumulus kinetic energy to cloud mass flux, thus rendering the initial study open to question concerning model validity. The second oceanic mechanism of interest can be called the dynamic radiation–convection (DRC) interaction, based on the persistent day–night differences in radiative cooling over deep convection in contrast with the surrounding clear-air areas. This feature

Full access
Song Yang, Kwo-Sen Kuo, and Eric A. Smith

), surface temperature (e.g., Smith 1986 ), surface winds (e.g., Deser and Smith 1998 ), surface pressure (e.g., Petenko and Argentini 2002 ), vertical motion (e.g., Krishnamurti and Kishtawal 2000 ), cloudiness (e.g., Wylie and Woolf 2002 ), and surface and TOA radiation fluxes (e.g., Smith et al. 1986 ; Smith and Shi 1992 ; Smith and Rutan 2003 ) as some of the foremost variables. Notably, lengthy time series derived from satellite measurements of various atmospheric variables have motivated

Full access