Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • Forecasting techniques x
  • Journal of Hydrometeorology x
  • Exchanges of Energy and Water at the Land-Atmosphere Interface x
  • All content x
Clear All
Keith J. Harding and Peter K. Snyder

using a mesoscale atmospheric model, with up to 20% increases over individual locations. While irrigation has been shown to influence the spatial distribution of precipitation over the Great Plains and upper Midwest, identification of the relative quantity of irrigated water that falls as precipitation within the region allows for a better understanding of how irrigation affects the regional water budget. DeAngelis et al. (2010) employed a backward trajectory technique based on Dominguez et al

Full access
Craig R. Ferguson, Eric F. Wood, and Raghuveer K. Vinukollu

/or variability of coupling may play a large role in the predictability of regional climate (i.e., temperature and precipitation). For example, potential rainfall forecast skill from land may be high where coupling is strong and invariable and low where coupling is either consistently weak or strong but highly variable. In the past, there have been many attempts to evaluate coupling with models (e.g., Beljaars et al. 1996 ; Betts 2004 ; Cook et al. 2006 ; Delworth and Manabe 1989 ; Dirmeyer 2011

Full access
Keith J. Harding and Peter K. Snyder

minimize model edge effects. The goal of this study is to explore the impact that irrigation has on the hydrologic cycle using a high-resolution coupled land–atmosphere model. Simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF; Skamarock et al. 2008 ) were performed both with and without irrigation for a suite of years for different precipitation regimes. This includes El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) years that have a marked influence on Great Plains precipitation ( Twine et al

Full access
Agustín Robles-Morua, Enrique R. Vivoni, and Alex S. Mayer

, R / P (%), for GAUGES, NLDAS ADJ, and INEGI (2000b) in the USR basin. 4. Synthesis and conclusions This study documents an advanced technique for generating hydrologic predictions in mountainous basins under the influence of the NAM, characterized by variable atmospheric conditions. We evaluated the use of meteorological forcing from ground stations and from NLDAS and its adjustment. The scenarios yielded bimodal hydrologic forecasts, with 52%–78% of the annual runoff occurring during the NAM

Full access