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L. F. HUBERT and RUSSELL KOFFLER

elongatedpatch. Only a few bright streaks of dense lines and theirshadows on the underlying cloud deck show that theelongated patch is indeed the higher layer. In the infraredview, however, the patch appears ns a dark area indicatingthat it is warmer. Equally important, comparison of thepictures shows that the patch is nearly transparent to: -as.*I._ .NASHVlLl3visible radiation but nearly opaque to infrared radiation. 400The infrared view also pictures a cold cloud line run-ning along the axis of the warm

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RALPH K. ANDERSON

934 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW Vol. 98, No. 12UDC 551.515.E2:551.507.382.2:5!i1.576.1:5!i1.521.18(084.1)(~1.1) *11~.09.M"PICTURE OF THE MONTHAn Atlantic Cold Front, Satellite Infrared and Visual Data Compared RALPH K. ANDERSONApplications Group, National Environmental Satellite Service, NOAA, Washington, D.C.Clouds viewed in infrared (IR) are similar in appearance Figures 1A and 1B depict clouds associated with theto familiar TV data that meteorologists routinely use in North Atlantic

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FRANCES C. PARMENTER

December 1971979UDC 551.507.362.2:531.515.82:551.5i6:551.511.18(~4.1)(261.1) "1971.04.19"PICTURE OF THE MONTHInfrared View of an Atlantic StormFRANCES C. PARMENTERApplications Group, National Environmental Satellite Service, NOAA, Suitland, Md.Two previous twticles (Anderson 1970, Parment,er 1971)have discussed some of the mesoscale features that call beseen in satellite infrared (1R) (lata. This view (fig. 1)shows it number of synoptic scale features.This Apr. 19, 1971, nighttime ITOS 1 vie

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FRANCES C. PARMENTER

312 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW Vol. 99, No. 5UDC 551.Mn.3s2.2:55l.S7e:~l(oSr.l)(76) "197l.01.14"PICTURE OF THE MONTHA Nighttime Infrared ViewFRANCES C. PARMENTERApplications Group, National Environmental Satellite Service, NOAA, Suitland, Md.Infrared (IR) data are being received operationallyfrom NOAA 1 and from the improved TIROS operationalsatellite, ITOS 1. These satellites provide an importantnighttime view of the earth that supplements the simul-taneous video and IR coverage (Anderson 1970

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David M. Schultz, Derek S. Arndt, David J. Stensrud, and Jay W. Hanna

snow showers were organized over a much larger area. The widespread existence of these snow showers can be seen from the bands in the unfiltered, 0.5°-elevation-angle, Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radar reflectivity factor ( Fig. 2 ) and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-8 ( GOES-8 ) longwave infrared (channel 4) satellite imagery ( Fig. 3 ). For example, at their most widespread around 1000 UTC, the bands covered an area at least 600 km × 500 km. (For an

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