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Stacey Kawecki, Geoffrey M. Henebry, and Allison L. Steiner

States ( Hand et al. 2012 ). However, because we use the same boundary conditions for each simulation and this region is not located near the urban region of our analysis ( Fig. 2 ), the ammonium sulfate created in the northern portion of the domain does not significantly affect our analysis. 3. Results In the central United States, the Great Plains low-level jet consistently influences the region’s weather and climatology ( Bonner 1968 ). The prevailing south-southwesterly wind flow transports

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Jiwen Fan, Yuan Wang, Daniel Rosenfeld, and Xiaohong Liu

influence of aerosols in the Northern Hemisphere ( Xie et al. 2013 ). A recent modeling study by Wang et al. (2015) examined the response of large-scale circulations to the shift in maximum pollution from the United States and Europe to Asia since the 1970s. A reduced meridional streamfunction and zonal winds over the tropics as well as a poleward shift of the jet stream in the present-day aerosol conditions suggests weakened and expanded tropical circulations under the influence of the altered cloud

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Christina S. McCluskey, Thomas C. J. Hill, Camille M. Sultana, Olga Laskina, Jonathan Trueblood, Mitchell V. Santander, Charlotte M. Beall, Jennifer M. Michaud, Sonia M. Kreidenweis, Kimberly A. Prather, Vicki Grassian, and Paul J. DeMott

et al. (2009) . Ice crystals were collected via use of a single jet impactor (2.9- μ m 50% aerodynamic cutoff diameter; Prenni et al. 2009 ) at the base of the CFDC. ICRs (i.e., evaporated ice crystals) were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analyses, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. In each ICR collection period, approximately 5000 ice crystals are collected onto SEM grids [SPI formvar/carbon-coated transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids, 200

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Yun Lin, Yuan Wang, Bowen Pan, Jiaxi Hu, Yangang Liu, and Renyi Zhang

microphysics effects on various clouds with Dr. Jonathan H. Jiang at JPL. The data from the RACORO field campaign, utilized only for education and research, are open to public after registration and application. Supercomputing computational facilities were provided by the Texas A&M University. Yuan Wang’s contribution to this work was sponsored by NASA ROSES14-ACMAP and was carried at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA (Grant 105357

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