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Roger M. Wakimoto and Hanne V. Murphey

). This paper documents the kinematic and thermodynamic structure of a dryline that developed on 11 June 2002 during the International H 2 O Project (IHOP; Weckwerth et al. 2004 ). The dryline is a convergence boundary that separates hot, dry air from the Mexican plateau from the relatively cooler, maritime air from the Gulf of Mexico ( Rhea 1966 ; Schaefer 1974 , 1986 ). An airborne Doppler radar as well as a number of mobile research platforms converged on this boundary during the late afternoon

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Roger M. Wakimoto and Hanne V. Murphey

analysis of a number of convergence boundaries using analogous datasets. Such an analysis would result in generalized conclusions concerning the thermodynamic and kinematic characteristics of the boundaries and their relationship to thunderstorm formation. Hane et al. (2002) compared the characteristics of boundaries but was primarily restricted to using in situ data collected at flight level. Karan and Knupp (2006) and Harrison et al. (2009) studied a series of convergence boundaries but only at

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Margaret A. LeMone, Mukul Tewari, Fei Chen, Joseph G. Alfieri, and Dev Niyogi

the Zilitinkevich (1995) 3 equation used in the surface layer parameterization to compute the “scaling height” for heat and water vapor z 0 h from the roughness height z 0 m , which in HRLDAS is provided from a lookup table as a function of land-cover type. From Chen et al. (1997) , where u * is the friction velocity, k = 0.4 is the von Kármán constant, ν is the kinematic molecular viscosity of air (∼1.6 × 10 −5 m 2 s −1 ), and C is an empirical coefficient set to 0.1 based on

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Margaret A. LeMone, Fei Chen, Mukul Tewari, Jimy Dudhia, Bart Geerts, Qun Miao, Richard L. Coulter, and Robert L. Grossman

-scale roughness lengths for heat and momentum, u * is the grid-scale friction velocity, k = 0.4 is the von Kármán constant, υ is the kinematic molecular viscosity of air (∼1.5 × 10 −5 m 2 s −1 ), and C is an empirical coefficient, normally set to 0.1 based on comparing model results and field data ( Chen et al. 1997 ). In (1) , we use the aircraft-based regional (eastern track average) roughness values to be consistent with the default model roughness length for grass (0.12 m) and evidence that the

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