Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 65 items for :

  • Lidar observations x
  • Weather and Forecasting x
  • All content x
Clear All
Christian Herold, Dietrich Althausen, Detlef Müller, Matthias Tesche, Patric Seifert, Ronny Engelmann, Cyrille Flamant, Rohini Bhawar, and Paolo Di Girolamo

disappears almost completely due to the advection and mixing of humid air masses into the free troposphere. The lidar observed a different pattern of development for the vertical water vapor distribution. The dry layer persisted until the arrival of the MCS. This observation explains the deviations between the observations and the model at this height range. The advection of moister air masses in the free troposphere forecasted by COSMO-DE is also less dominant in the lidar observations. The dry layer

Full access
Irina V. Djalalova, Joseph Olson, Jacob R. Carley, Laura Bianco, James M. Wilczak, Yelena Pichugina, Robert Banta, Melinda Marquis, and Joel Cline

wind resource with extensive regions of shallow water relatively far from shore, which makes offshore wind power plants less costly to build and maintain. Typical annual-averaged wind speeds in the northern East Coast region are higher than 7 m s −1 near turbine hub heights (approximately 90 m above the surface of the ocean). Despite the potential for offshore wind energy development, there is a lack of reliable wind observations at the heights of turbine rotors over the ocean, generally as a

Full access
Junjun Hu, Nusrat Yussouf, David D. Turner, Thomas A. Jones, and Xuguang Wang

, D. E. Wolfe , S. P. Oncley , and J. K. Lundquist , 2017 : Validating precision estimates in horizontal wind measurements from a Doppler lidar . Atmos. Meas. Tech. , 10 , 1229 , https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-10-1229-2017 . 10.5194/amt-10-1229-2017 Ochotta , T. , C. Gebhardt , D. Saupe , and W. Wergen , 2005 : Adaptive thinning of atmospheric observations in data assimilation with vector quantization and filtering methods . Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc. , 131 , 3427 – 3437 , https

Full access
Stephen D. Eckermann, Andreas Dörnbrack, Harald Flentje, Simon B. Vosper, M. J. Mahoney, T. Paul Bui, and Kenneth S. Carslaw

amplitudes of shorter-wavelength (nonhydrostatic) mountain waves that are not resolved by the coarser-resolution MM5 forecasts over Scandinavia. Previous lidar observations of PSCs had shown wavy signals within the clouds themselves, with wavelengths often as short as 10–20 km ( Carslaw et al. 1998b ; Wirth et al. 1999 ), which can make a significant contribution to local cooling and PSC evolution. The horizontal and vertical grid spacings used for the forecasts were Δ x = Δ y = 2 km and Δ z = 650 m

Full access
Howard B. Bluestein

observations to propose a waterspout life cycle. Church et al. (1973) and Leverson et al. (1977) reported on in situ data collected by a waterspout-penetrating aircraft. Schwiesow (1981) and Schwiesow et al. (1981) reported on the wind structure of waterspouts based on remote measurements made with a continuous-wave (CW; i.e., with no ranging capability) Doppler lidar. 2. Field programs focussed on visual observations: 1972–87 At about the same time as the airborne waterspout campaigns were

Full access
Irina V. Djalalova, Laura Bianco, Elena Akish, James M. Wilczak, Joseph B. Olson, Jaymes S. Kenyon, Larry K. Berg, Aditya Choukulkar, Richard Coulter, Harinda J. S. Fernando, Eric Grimit, Raghavendra Krishnamurthy, Julie K. Lundquist, Paytsar Muradyan, David D. Turner, and Sonia Wharton

experiments as “reforecast runs.” Model verification and validation were performed using a variety of instruments deployed during WFIP2 ( Wilczak et al. 2019b ; Pichugina et al. 2019 ; Bianco et al. 2019 ; Grimit 2020 ). Among those were 19 sonic detection and ranging (sodars) and 7 light detection and ranging (lidars), measuring wind speed and direction from a minimum of 10 m to a few hundred meters (or more) above ground level (AGL), depending on the system. These heights represent the layer of the

Restricted access
L. Cucurull and M. J. Mueller

.1175/BAMS-89-3-313 Atlas , R. , 1997 : Atmospheric observations and experiments to assess their usefulness in data assimilation . J. Meteor. Soc. Japan , 75 , 111 – 130 , https://doi.org/10.2151/jmsj1965.75.1B_111 . 10.2151/jmsj1965.75.1B_111 Atlas , R. , and Coauthors , 2015a : Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) to evaluate the potential impact of an optical autocovariance wind lidar (OAWL) on numerical weather prediction . J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol. , 32 , 1593 – 1613

Free access
L. Cucurull and M. J. Mueller

.1175/BAMS-89-3-313 Atlas , R. , 1997 : Atmospheric observations and experiments to assess their usefulness in data assimilation . J. Meteor. Soc. Japan , 75 , 111 – 130 , https://doi.org/10.2151/jmsj1965.75.1B_111 . 10.2151/jmsj1965.75.1B_111 Atlas , R. , and Coauthors , 2015a : Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) to evaluate the potential impact of an optical autocovariance wind lidar (OAWL) on numerical weather prediction . J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol. , 32 , 1593 – 1613

Free access
Cyril Morcrette, Katie Brown, Rebecca Bowyer, Philip Gill, and Dan Suri

0.23° and a grid size of 26 km on the equator. All simulations were initialized at 0000 UTC and run for 36 h. For evaluation against satellite observations, 365 simulations were carried out covering 1 March 2016–28 February 2017, and the comparisons were done at 1200 UTC using model data valid at T + 36. For comparison against ground-based radar and lidar observations, 30 simulations were initialized at 0000 UTC each day from 31 March to the end of April 2007 and hourly model data with a lead

Open access
Mana Inoue, Alexander D. Fraser, Neil Adams, Scott Carpentier, and Helen E. Phillips

/postponement of survey work, and for ground transportation. However, weather forecasting in Antarctica is less accurate than in other places in the world, and fewer forecasting studies have been conducted in this area because of insufficient in situ observations, and the harsh, isolated environment ( Turner et al. 2000 ; Adams 2002 ; Pendlebury et al. 2003 ). Flight operations across Antarctica are generally performed under visual flight rules (VFR). Minimum requirements for descent procedures into unknown

Full access