Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • Pictures of the Month in Monthly Weather Review x
  • All content x
Clear All
FRANCES C. PARMENTER

PICTURE OF THE MONTHComparison of Visible, Infrared,and Moisture Channel DataFRANCES C. PARMENTER-Applications Group, National Environmental SatelliteService, NOAA, Suitland, Md.Three different types of satellite data, acquired during 1. Two-channel scanning radiometer data from thethe 1970 Cloud Truth Program, are discussed in this Nimbus 4 satellite appear in figures 2 and 3. The 10.5- toarticle. The ESSA 9 television coverage of the western 12.5-pm "window" channel data in figure 2

Full access
David M. Schultz, Derek S. Arndt, David J. Stensrud, and Jay W. Hanna

before reaching the stable inversion layer. If radiational cooling were able to explain the observed cooling, a nocturnal inversion would be expected at the surface, which was not observed ( Fig. 4c ). Likewise, the moisture profiles did not change substantially ( Fig. 4c ), indicating that moistening by the precipitation aloft played a minimal role in lowering the height of the lifting condensation level. Other soundings (not shown) also indicate that, where cold-air advection was able to lower the

Full access
FRANCES C. PARMENTER

188 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW Vol. 96, No. 3PICTURE OF THE MONTHFRANCES C. PARMENTERNational Environmental Satellite Center, ESSA, Washington, D.CAn analysis of 328 tornado situations [I] indicates thatcertain elements-moisture, stability, freezing level,middle and high level winds, fronts, and squall lines-twe nec.essary for the occurrence of severe st,orms. Someinformation about these elements can be ext,racted fromsatellite photographs.On June 9, 1967, 89 occurrences of severe weather

Full access
EDWARD W. FERGUSON and FRANCES PARMENTER

it iscommon over oceanic areas where the effects of frictionare less and moisture is more plentiful.) The striations inthe cirroform cloud shield which emanate from a pointwest of P and extend northeast to Q, suggest sharp anti-cyclonic flow in the upper levels.Much of the bright area near R and northward is snowon the Rocky Mountains.The cloud band in the lower right corner of the mosaic isassociated with a cold front extending across the Gulf of.L ,The accompanying ESSA 3 photomosaic (fig. 3

Full access
VINCENT J. OLIVER

470 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW Vol. 96, No. 7 PICTURE OF THE MONTHCellular Cumulus Over the Pacific Ocean VINCENT J. OLIVERNational Environmental Satellite Center, ESSA, Washington, D.C.Large areas of cloudiness are frequently observed over clouds. When viewed from the satellite, these clouds ap-moisture-laden oceanic regions. These clouds form as pear in cellular patterns. There are two distinct types ofequator-bound unstable polar air is heated from below by pattern: open cellular

Full access
FRANCES C. PARMENTER

sea-surface temperature, strength of any inversion, theare best defined at the 200-mb level. They can exist as a moisture content, and stability.shear line, or they may contain a series of well-developed In the eastern North Pacific, a cold sea surface and lowvortices. The cloud amount, distribution, and organization tropospheric inversion result in extensive areas of lowassociated with such an upper level trough depend on the thin fog, stratus, or stratocumulus. Upper level vorticesFIQURE 1

Full access
WOODROW W. LENNON and CLYDE P. THOMAS

evaluate properly all echoes in a largepresentation.Anomalous propagation caused by superrefraction ofthe radar beam occufred during the early morning ofJune 6, 1969. Superrefraction means that the curvatureof the radar beam is greater than normal, resulting inan extraordinary display of ground targets (Battan1959). Superrefraction occurs when there is an increaseof temperature and/or decrease of moisture with height.In this case, a stable dry air mass and radiation coolingcreated the proper conditions

Full access
FRANCES C. PARMENTER

easily be seen"FIGURE 3.-ESSA 6 Pass 5201-2, 1929-2102 QMT, June 3, 1968.in the satellite pictures on June 2, but it was difficult toidentify it in the stability or moisture analysis which is

Full access
FRANCES C. PARMENTER

easily be seen"FIGURE 3.-ESSA 6 Pass 5201-2, 1929-2102 QMT, June 3, 1968.in the satellite pictures on June 2, but it was difficult toidentify it in the stability or moisture analysis which is

Full access
EDWARD A. JESSUP

the eye of the stormto collect temperature, moisture, rainfall rate, andraindrop-size data.Meteorologists aboard the two aircraft described thestorm after their return to Norman. Although the secondof Felice is being undertaken by Dr. T. Fujita, University of Chicago.Cooper, Weather Science, Inc., Norman, Okla.*A comprehensive analysis of the meteorological data in this photograph and others1 Leslie Lemon, Ensign, USESSA, on temporary sssignment at NSSL and Lynnpenetration occurred 3 hr aft,er the

Full access