Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for :

  • North America x
  • Process-Oriented Model Diagnostics x
  • All content x
Clear All
Zhe Feng, Fengfei Song, Koichi Sakaguchi, and L. Ruby Leung

(CAM5) physics ( Sakaguchi et al. 2015 ; Zhao et al. 2016 ). Simulations from this model with regional refinement at mesoscale resolution over North America are analyzed as a test case to demonstrate the utility of the new diagnostic approach developed in this study for model evaluation and guiding the directions for future development. At the core of the developed framework is a novel MCS tracking algorithm for mesoscale resolution models based on high-resolution observations. To facilitate

Open access
Suzana J. Camargo, Claudia F. Giulivi, Adam H. Sobel, Allison A. Wing, Daehyun Kim, Yumin Moon, Jeffrey D. O. Strong, Anthony D. Del Genio, Maxwell Kelley, Hiroyuki Murakami, Kevin A. Reed, Enrico Scoccimarro, Gabriel A. Vecchi, Michael F. Wehner, Colin Zarzycki, and Ming Zhao

Table 3 and they are named P1–P10. The CAM5-SE simulations used a variable-resolution grid, with resolution of 0.25° in the North Atlantic and 1° in the rest of the globe. Table 3. List of the NOAA process diagnostics models analyzed, including references, their horizontal resolution, and tracking routines. Camargo and Zebiak: Camargo and Zebiak (2002) , Cherchi: Cherchi et al. (2019) , Delworth: Delworth et al. (2012) , Gent: Gent et al. (2011) ; Molod: Molod et al. (2015) , Murakami

Restricted access
Stephanie A. Henderson, Eric D. Maloney, and Seok-Woo Son

Hartmann 2006 ; Lau and Waliser 2012 ), as well as important modes of climate variability such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO; e.g., Cassou 2008 ; Lin et al. 2009 ) and the Pacific–North American (PNA) pattern (e.g., Mori and Watanabe 2008 ; Riddle et al. 2013 ). The widespread influence of the MJO implies that accurate prediction of global circulation patterns and weather events requires consideration of MJO activity and its accurate simulation in climate and weather forecasting models

Full access
Jiabao Wang, Hyemi Kim, Daehyun Kim, Stephanie A. Henderson, Cristiana Stan, and Eric D. Maloney

heating propagate poleward and eastward into the extratropics, modulating circulations therein (e.g., Horel and Wallace 1981 ; Hoskins and Karoly 1981 ). The influence of tropical heating variations on the extratropics frequently manifests as changes in the teleconnection patterns that link variability over remote regions ( Wallace and Gutzler 1981 ). For example, in the North Pacific, a negative Pacific–North America (PNA)-like pattern can be triggered about 5–10 days after MJO phase 3 (e.g., Hsu

Open access
Douglas E. Miller and Zhuo Wang

2004 ; Brönnimann 2007 ; Mariotti 2007 ; Grimm and Tedeschi 2009 ). For example, anomalous convection in the central to eastern tropical Pacific excites a Rossby wave train spanning from the North Pacific to North America [known as the Pacific–North American (PNA) pattern ( Wallace and Gutzler 1981 ; Barnston and Livezey 1987 )], modulates the midlatitude storm track, and leads to precipitation and temperature anomalies in North America ( Cole and Cook 1998 ; Wang et al. 2007 ). Coupled global

Full access
Julian F. Quinting and Christian M. Grams

all regions ( Fig. 6e ). The highest values of β 4 , a (up to 150) occur at the northern edges of the climatological WCB ascent regions. For WCB outflow, positive β 1 , o ( Fig. 7b ) reveals that high relative humidity at 300 hPa is associated with an increased probability of WCB outflow [cf. Eq. (5) ]. This relation is evident at nearly all grid points except for the subtropical North Atlantic (south of 35°N and from 40° to 30°W) and subtropical North America (30°N, 100°W). Likewise, a

Restricted access
Alexis Berg and Justin Sheffield

SM–ET coupling strength across models in Fig. 2 ? Figure 3a shows that, to a large extent, model differences in SM–ET coupling can be traced back to differences in mean background (summer) precipitation. Intermodel correlations between mean summer precipitation and SM–ET coupling are negative over most of the land surface. This is consistent with results over North America from Herrera-Estrada and Sheffield (2017) . This reflects the fact that in models with greater (lower) precipitation, ET

Full access
Eric D. Maloney, Andrew Gettelman, Yi Ming, J. David Neelin, Daniel Barrie, Annarita Mariotti, C.-C. Chen, Danielle R. B. Coleman, Yi-Hung Kuo, Bohar Singh, H. Annamalai, Alexis Berg, James F. Booth, Suzana J. Camargo, Aiguo Dai, Alex Gonzalez, Jan Hafner, Xianan Jiang, Xianwen Jing, Daehyun Kim, Arun Kumar, Yumin Moon, Catherine M. Naud, Adam H. Sobel, Kentaroh Suzuki, Fuchang Wang, Junhong Wang, Allison A. Wing, Xiaobiao Xu, and Ming Zhao

that may be written in diverse coding languages. PODs developed or under development for the first task include cloud microphysical processes; tropical and extratropical cyclones; ENSO teleconnections and atmospheric dynamics; land–atmosphere interactions; MJO moisture, convection, and radiative processes; precipitation diurnal cycle; AMOC; Arctic sea ice; lake-effect processes; North American monsoon; radiative forcing and cloud–circulation feedbacks; and temperature and precipitation extremes

Open access
Alexis Berg and Justin Sheffield

and LAI were available. Finally, soil evaporation is the dominant term in dry subtropical regions with little vegetation, such as Australia, southern Africa, or western North America, reaching up to 60% of total ET, and up to 100% in desert regions like the Sahara and the Middle East ( Fig. 1d ). In these regions total ET is low ( Fig. 1a ). The fraction of soil evaporation decreases rapidly in models as LAI initially increases ( Fig. 2d ) but still represents around 10% of ET in the tropics, and

Full access
James F. Booth, Catherine M. Naud, and Jeff Willison

between extratropical cyclone steering and blocking along the North American east coast . Geophys. Res. Lett. , 44 , 11 976 – 11 984 , https://doi.org/10.1002/2017GL075941 . 10.1002/2017GL075941 Boutle , I. A. , S. E. Belcher , and R. S. Plant , 2011 : Moisture transport in midlatitude cyclones . Quart. J. Roy. Meteor. Soc. , 137 , 360 – 373 , https://doi.org/10.1002/qj.783 . 10.1002/qj.783 Browning , K. A. , and N. M. Roberts , 1996 : Variation of frontal and precipitation

Open access