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  • Ways of Knowing: Traditional Knowledge as Key Insight for Addressing Environmental Change x
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Randy A. Peppler

colored Gila Monster” had been found wandering in a residential area by two 4-yr olds. As written in this response, “a Maricopa Indian girl from the Salt River Reservation” who served as an informant indicated that this sighting “portends a long and very cold winter.” Also in Arizona, the Navajo Tribal Council in Window Rock reported on a number of observational signs. In late summer, small animals gather and store leaves, grain, and plants if they sense an early frost, and horses and other fur

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Shannon M. McNeeley

of water at the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming to illustrate the interplay of policy, culture, climate, justice, and limits to adaptation. The structural barriers faced by indigenous peoples in the United States are largely the legacy of federal government removal, allotment, and homestead policies of the 1800s and early 1900s. These included the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the Dawes General Allotment Act (also known as the Dawes Act) of 1887, the latter of which continued until 1934 with

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Susan A. Crate

and project. 3. Case study a. Background To provide background for this analysis, I focus here on specific details of Sakha land tenure and the place of water in the Sakha ecosystem, since both are key to understanding the issues related to ‘water in mind’. Sakha are relative newcomers to their subarctic homeland, considering that their Turkic ancestors transmigrated from central Asia to southern Siberia circa tenth century, then up the Lena River to their present inhabitance in several waves

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L. Jen Shaffer and Leocadia Naiene

. Changalane Weather Station is indicated with a black star. Table 1. Community and interview respondent characteristics. A mosaic of grassland, wetland, woodland and thicket, swamp forest, and rare sand forest covers the sand dunes comprising Matutúine District’s landscape. Freshwater and brackish lakes, along with the Maputo and Futí Rivers, contribute to ecosystem diversity and provide permanent water sources for human and nonhuman communities. Pans between the dunes hold water during wetter periods

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Oluwatoyin Dare Kolawole, Moseki Ronald Motsholapheko, Barbara Ntombi Ngwenya, Olekae Thakadu, Gagoitseope Mmopelwa, and Donald Letsholo Kgathi

understanding of the variations in ecosystems and utilize their indigenous knowledge systems to develop traditional farming systems that are adaptable to their environment ( Dougill et al. 2010 ; Mogotsi et al. 2011 ). For example, flood recession farming households in the Okavango Delta plough their fields under rain-fed conditions or plough within shallow river channels where soil moisture is available from the relatively high water table ( Motsholapheko et al. 2012a ). This indeed partly buttresses the

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Sarah E. Vaughn

have been inundated with water from not only the EDWC but also the sea. Engineers devised a plan that allowed them to release water into a nearby river. While this strategy saved Georgetown in this instance, it further exacerbated flooding in rural communities. After the 2005 disaster, engineers worked with World Bank consultants to create flood models. Scenarios were bleak, whether from a rising tide or abnormal rainfall events; the EDWC was in need of a major overhaul in design to withstand

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Mimi Stith, Alessandra Giannini, John del Corral, Susana Adamo, and Alex de Sherbinin

distributed in Mali and Niger than in Burkina Faso and Senegal, perhaps an artifact of région size. The majority of projects in Senegal are concentrated in the east, along the valley of the Senegal River, which flows from the highlands of Guinea and forms the border with Mali and Mauritania, though the région with the most projects is Kolda, in the south. The majority of projects in Burkina Faso are concentrated to the west and north of the capital, which lies at the center of the country, though the

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Randy A. Peppler

—well, these were cakes. We had the hardest time finding those, and in my day they used to have bushes all over. And finally we found some up on the side of the road up by Fort Cobb.” She also related a story about what used to grow along the Washita River: We’d go down to swim in the Washita River, as red and muddy as it is, and we’d have a muddy slide. On our way down you could always find something—they’d have a melon field and we thought nothing of pulling that out and breaking it in two, and they had

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Daniel B. Ferguson, Anna Masayesva, Alison M. Meadow, and Michael A. Crimmins

the Little Colorado River for decades, but a contentious settlement tentatively agreed to by all the parties in 2012 failed to be passed by the U.S. Congress in 2012 ( Lee 2013 , p. 643). 5. Results The HDNR–UA collaboration was designed to develop a drought information system that could yield information useful for tribal leaders, resource managers, and citizens and that is feasible within the constraints of existing human and financial resources. Here we summarize some of the key considerations

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Laurie Yung, Nicky Phear, Alayna DuPont, Jess Montag, and Daniel Murphy

sacrifice” (3, 7) program to leave water in the river for downstream irrigators. In the Big Hole Valley, some of the ranchers worked to ameliorate the impacts of drought on the Arctic grayling, which, if listed under the Endangered Species Act, could result in significant reductions in water available for irrigation. Some ranchers in these two valleys suggested that they benefited from “working together” (14) with federal agencies, which provided them access to grant money for improved irrigation

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