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ARTHUR H. SMITH

PICTURE OF THE MONTHSnow Covers the SouthlandARTHUR H. SMITH-Satellite Field Services Station, NESS,NOAA, Washington, D.C.The NOAA 2 VHRR (visible) data of Feb. 10 and 11, numerous reports of moderate to heavy snow and ice1973 reveal, in detail, the structure of a major st,orm pellets, in addition to occasional thunder and hail. Thealong with the resulting SnOR cover Over the southeastern cirrus sheet associat,ed with the storm extended as farUnited States. On the morning of Feb. 10, 1973, a

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RALPH K. ANDERSON

260 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW Vol. 96, No. 4PICTURE OF THE MONTHView of Snow-Covered Northeastern United States and a Developing East Coast StormRALPH K. ANDERSONApplications Group, National Environmental Satellite Center, ESSA, Washington, D.C.Figure 1, received on January 1, 1968, from the ESSA gnowfall is centered near the southern coast of Nova6 APT satellite, shows an excellent clear-sky view of the Scotia at the time of the picture. This storm deepenednortheastern United States as it

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TERRY R. SCHOENI

PICTURE OF THE MONTHAutumn Snow Storms in the PlainsTERRY R. SCHOENI4atellite Field Services Station, National EnvironmentalSatellite Service, NOAA, Kansas City, Mo.River Forecast Centers (RFC's) and Weather ServiceForecast Offices (WSFO's) in the Great Plains Statesrequire more detailed snow cover data than can beobtained from standard reporting stations. Early in theseason, the RFC acquires initial snowfall reports fromtheir river-rainfall network but receives little subsequentdata between

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PICTURE OFTHE MONTHThe pictures shown here illustrate how satellite photo-graphs, even of poor resolution, might be used for snowsurvey in remote. data sparse, regions. The white areasin the foreground are a mixture of snow and clouds, butthe dendritic pattern that is especially clear near thearrow is the typical form of snow on rugged terrainthat can be distinguished from cloud cover. The darkareas near the picture centers are caused by the ruggedterrain at the western end of the Tyan Shan

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northern shore, andbecoming much larger convective elements over the southernGulf (lower left of (b)). Land areas appear largely clear, and aheavy snow cover is visible in (a) from the mid-Mississippi Valleycastward.P:lss 3030/3038, Camera 1, frame 7, 1636 GMT, January 30, 1966.(d) Pass :3067-dircct, Camera 1, frame 5, 1538 GMT, February 1,1966.On January 31 (c) cold air continued to dominate Florida andthe adjacent Atlantic, with much convection again visible over theAtlantic. Morning minimum

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FRANCES C. PARMENTER

252MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW Vol. 98, No. 3UDC 551.M)7.362.2:551.578.46(084.1)(71)PICTURE OF THE MONTH Trans-Canada Highway FRANCES C. PARMENTERNational Environmental Satellite Center, ESSA, Washington, D.C.1This month's picture comes from C. I. Tapgart of theSatellite Data Laboratory, Department of Transport,Toronto, Canada. This ESSA 8, APT, picture, taken athis stat,ion on Mar. 4, 1969, provides an excellent clear-skyview of the snow-covered area between the Great Lakesand Hudson Bay

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368MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEWPICTURE OF THE MONTHVol. 92, No. 8cThese four TIROS 1-11 photographs show the snow-covered Kamchatka Peninsula on different days underrelatively clear conditions. The comparat'ively dark areanear the center of the peninsula is a low-lying valley.hlountain ranges lie on either side of the dark area, roughlyparallel to the coasts; that these appear as relativelybrighter topographic features is presumably due to t'hegreater snow depth and lesser vegetation at the

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FRANCES C. PARMENTER

September 1969683UDC 551.610.42:634.0.431:551.502.362.2PICTURE. OF THE .MONTH Alaskan Forest Fires FRANCES C. PARMENTERNational Environmental Satellite Center, ESSA, Washington, D.C.During the month of June, Alaska experienced the mostdamaging forest fires since 1957. A very dry winter, withlittle snow cover, and very wum and dry spring broughtabout a dangerousIy high poss;bXty of forest fires. B,midJune, many areas were burning. Most of these firesare believed to be a result of man

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586MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEWPICTURE OF THE MONTHVol. 93, No. 10TIROS IX, Pass 835/834, Camera 2, Frame 4, 1028 GMT, April 1, 1965.Snow-covered terrain, foggy ocean, and mountain-waveclouds are distinctly separated and clearly visible in thisTIROS IX photograph, which is centered over southernNorway. The satellite altitude at picture time was ap-proximately 795 km., not far from perigee. North isindicated by the arrow. The photograph was taken onApril 1, 1965-the 5th anniversary of the launch

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FRANCES C. PARMENTER

during the last 20 1'1.. This year'sincrease in pack ice was attributed to the lower thannormal (4-6'F below normal) temperatures during thewinter and spring. A record accumulation of ice, 32 in.thick, was reported at St. Anthony, Newfoundland, inMarch.This sequence of Automatic Picture Transmission(APT) photogmphs shows the changes in the ice along thenorth and east side of Newfoundland. On May 3 (fig. l), anarea of snow-covered ice (H-I-J) extended southeastwardalong the western shore of the Davis

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