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MONTHLY T7VEATHER REVIEWPICTURE OF THE MONTH345This TIROS V photograph (pass 542/541, frame 12)was taken over the far southern Indian Ocean on July 27,1962, at approximately 0720 GMT, and was received atWallops Station via tape mode. North is roughly towardthe top of the picture.The two apparent vortices are only about 450 milesapart, an unusually short distance for synoptic-scalefeatures. The one on the left is centered approximatelyat 55' S., 103' E., and the one on the right near 54' S.,115

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the surface posit,ion of the slowly-moving cold frontis slightly north of the rope-like edge, but near the southern bound-ary of the band. The clouds are probably predominantly at lowand middle levels, but some cirrus may also exist.Similar ropclike cloud features associated with extensirr cloudmasses have been seen several times over subtropical ocean areasand are most often along the southern edge of a cold-frontal bandas is the case here. No such feature has been observed at latitudeshigher

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206 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEWPICTURE OF THE MONTHThese two TIROS I11 photogra.phs, both received viatlkpe mode at Wallops Station, Va., were taken about 2months and 5,000 miles apart. Each shows strikinglylarge parsllel bands over low-latitude, Southern Hemi-sphere ocean areas; and in both c.ases the bands areoriented very nearly ea.st-west, with the width of eachband of the order of 150 miles.The picture on the left (~RSS 199!198, frame 7, 0620GMT, July 26, 1961) was hken over the southern

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586MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEWPICTURE OF THE MONTHVol. 93, No. 10TIROS IX, Pass 835/834, Camera 2, Frame 4, 1028 GMT, April 1, 1965.Snow-covered terrain, foggy ocean, and mountain-waveclouds are distinctly separated and clearly visible in thisTIROS IX photograph, which is centered over southernNorway. The satellite altitude at picture time was ap-proximately 795 km., not far from perigee. North isindicated by the arrow. The photograph was taken onApril 1, 1965-the 5th anniversary of the launch

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JAY ROSENTHAL

UDC 551.515.23:551.507.562.2(084.1)(268)C79~)"1972.QS"PICTURE OF THE MONTHLate Summer Hazards to CoastalSouthern CaliforniaJAY ROSENTHAL-Geophysics Division, Pacific Missile Range, Point Mugu, Calif.The advent of sat,ellite surveillance has helped in theidentification and forecasting of oceanic disturbancesthat generate destructive sea swells which assault southernCalifornia's harbors, beaches, and shore installations fromt,he sout,h. Meteorological satellites have shown the majorcause of these

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54 MONTHLY WEATHER REVIEW Vol. 94, No. 1PICTURE OF THE MONTH160 E New Zealand 150: WTIROS IS, pass 203/202, Cameras 1 and 2, 0207 GMT, February 8, 1965.Two dist,inct and clenrly-defined centers of cyclonicvorticity we cont,ained within this TIROS IX doublepltotogrnph, t,nken o\-er the fnr Southern Pacific Ocean.'rile mnjor cent.er is locnted near 58O Y., 172" W.; thesecondnry cent,er is near 50' S., 156" W. The outline ofSouth Islnnd, Kew Zealnnd, has been ndded at, upper left.It is believed

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RALPH K. ANDERSON

River Valley, Long Island, andDelaware and Chesapeake Bays. The southern edge of thedetectable snow cover passes northeastward throughsouthern Maryland to the Atlantic shore.Of meteorological interest is the frontal band whichcurves southwestward from the storm center to 33"N.,8O"W. The edge of a cirrus cloud shield enters the westernportion of the picture at 37"N. and extends eastward outover the ocean. The shadow cast by this formation can beseen along its poleward edge, both on the snow

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CLEON J. BITER

the lowcenter.''A continuing study, being conducted at' the US. NavyWeatsher Research Facility [2], of daily composites of 1. [Staff, National Environmental Satellite Center], "Picture ofSouthern Hemisphere nephanalyses indicates that such the Month," Monthly Weather Review, vol. 94, No. 1, Jan.positioning of major cloud bands with respect to low cen- 1966, p. 54.ters over the Southern Ocean is rather common. It also ern Hemispheric Cloud Systems,,, NWRF Paper

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FRANCES C. PARMENTER

effect of the upper level wind patternweakened as it moved eastward over Florida and then and rapid northeastward movement of the system causedover the Atlantic Ocean. By May 4, the cloud mass was this cirriform cloud area to form into the long cloud trailcentered just east of the Bahamas. Subsequent rapid or plume configuration seen in figure 1.FIGURE 1.-Atlantic cirrus plume, ESSA 8, 1208 GMT on May 6, 1969.August 1969Frances J. Parmenter61 7f"60"55 '=a,a,"50 *-"45 O-40 7v)z"35 r""30 ccn2020 40

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FRANCES C. PARMENTER

April 29 smoke once againcovered the western half of the Gulf (S, fig. IC).A strong frontal system moved into the Gulf of Mexicoon May 1. With the change in low-level flow, fog andstratus covered the coastal lowlands (W, fig. lD), andairborne smoke moved southward across Southern Mexicoand out over the Pacific Ocean (S, fig. 1D). On May 4,smoke covered an area between 10' and 15"N and 90' and108"W. A subsequent change in lom-level flow on May 5once again allowed the smoke to drift northward

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