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M. A. Rawlins, S. Frolking, R. B. Lammers, and C. J. Vörösmarty

available datasets ( section 2.3 ) to judge the impact of climate on the simulated water budgets. PET is estimated using the Hamon method [ Hamon 1963 ; Equation (A1) in appendix A ], the surface-dependent Penman–Monteith method [PM; Monteith 1965 ; Equation (A2) in appendix A ], and the PM method with adjusted vapor pressure data, described in section 2.4 . Details of the simulations to produce the nine scenarios and the comparisons with observed evapotranspiration (ET) and runoff are described

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A. D. McGuire, J. E. Walsh, J. S. Kimball, J. S. Clein, S. E. Euskirchen, S. Drobot, U. C. Herzfeld, J. Maslanik, R. B. Lammers, M. A. Rawlins, C. J. Vorosmarty, T. S. Rupp, W. Wu, and M. Calef

simulation of regional hydrology was sensitive to precipitation and water vapor differences among the driving datasets and that accurate simulation of regional water balance is limited by biases in the forcing data. Satellite-based analyses for the region indicate that vegetation productivity of the region increased during the last two decades of the twentieth century because of earlier spring thaw, and the temporal variability of vegetation productivity simulated by the models from 1980 to 2000 was

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J. S. Kimball, M. Zhao, A. D. McGuire, F. A. Heinsch, J. Clein, M. Calef, W. M. Jolly, S. Kang, S. E. Euskirchen, K. C. McDonald, and S. W. Running

conditions (i.e., no environmental stress); T f is a scalar that defines reductions in photosynthesis under low temperature conditions; and VPD f is a scalar that defines similar reductions under suboptimal surface air vapor pressure deficit and associated daytime water stress conditions. Both T f and VPD f are dimensionless parameters ranging from 1 for optimal conditions to 0 under complete canopy stomatal closure and minimal photosynthetic activity. Both T f and VPD f are defined from daily

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J. S. Kimball, K. C. McDonald, and M. Zhao

defines similar reductions under suboptimal surface air vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and associated daytime water stress conditions. Both T f and VPD f are dimensionless parameters ranging from 1 for optimal conditions to 0 under complete canopy stomatal closure and minimal photosynthetic activity. Both T f and VPD f are defined from daily air temperature ( T min ) and VPD using simple photosynthetic response curves. These response curves and ε max are prescribed for different biome types

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