Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 15 items for :

  • Waves, atmospheric x
  • LatMix: Studies of Submesoscale Stirring and Mixing x
  • All content x
Clear All
E. Kunze, J. M. Klymak, R.-C. Lien, R. Ferrari, C. M. Lee, M. A. Sundermeyer, and L. Goodman

, T. B. Sanford , T. R. Osborn , and A. J. Williams III , 1981 : A composite spectrum of vertical shear in the upper ocean . J. Phys. Oceanogr. , 11 , 1258–1271 , doi: 10.1175/1520-0485(1981)011<1258:ACSOVS>2.0.CO;2 . Gregg , M. C. , and E. Kunze , 1991 : Internal-wave shear and strain in Santa Monica basin . J. Geophys. Res. , 96 , 16 709 – 16 719 , doi: 10.1029/91JC01385 . Hoskins , B. J. , and F. P. Bretherton , 1972 : Atmospheric frontogenesis models: Mathematical

Full access
Anne-Marie E. G. Brunner-Suzuki, Miles A. Sundermeyer, and M.-Pascale Lelong

1. Introduction Submesoscale vortices and internal waves are closely linked by their generation mechanism, location, and scale. Internal wave (IW) wave breaking causes diapycnal mixing, resulting in patches of well-mixed fluid. Such IW wave-breaking events and mixed patches are ubiquitous, but sporadic in time and space [e.g., Stellwagen Bank ( Haury et al. 1979) , the California Current ( Gregg et al. 1986 ), off the California coast ( Alford and Pinkel 2000 ), the North Atlantic ( Polzin et

Full access
Anne-Marie E. G. Brunner-Suzuki, Miles A. Sundermeyer, and M.-Pascale Lelong

1. Introduction Lateral mixing, often parameterized by lateral diffusivity, can be enhanced by a variety of processes. Among these is the geostrophic adjustment of multiple and sporadic patches of well-mixed water ( Sundermeyer et al. 2005 ). Geostrophic adjustment transforms mixed patches into vortices ( McWilliams 1988 ) that then stir the surrounding fluid. When vortices and internal waves coexist, the vortices are subject to internal wave shear and strain. Once the shear exceeds a certain

Full access
Ren-Chieh Lien and Thomas B. Sanford

1. Introduction Oceanic variations at horizontal scales smaller than O (100) km, vertical scales less than the order of tens of meters, and frequencies between inertial and buoyancy frequencies are generally thought to be internal waves. The most prominent features of internal waves are that they propagate and do not possess Ertel potential vorticity (PV). Müller (1984) proposes that a PV-carrying finestructure, termed vortical motion, coexists with internal waves at the same spatial scales

Full access
Daniel B. Whitt, Leif N. Thomas, Jody M. Klymak, Craig M. Lee, and Eric A. D’Asaro

turbulence. None of the above studies considered the possibility that superinertial waves may be trapped between filaments of cyclonic vertical vorticity, as discussed here. 7. Conclusions A high-resolution Lagrangian survey of the North Wall of the Gulf Stream made during strong and variable wintertime atmospheric forcing provided the unique, new opportunity to observe the interaction of NIWs with a current in the submesoscale dynamical regime and dominated by cyclonic vorticity. The ageostrophic

Full access
Daniel B. Whitt and Leif N. Thomas

convection and restratification over the Gulf Stream . Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc. , 90 , 1337 – 1350 , doi: 10.1175/2009BAMS2706.1 . Mickett , J. B. , Y. L. Serra , M. F. Cronnin , and M. H. Alford , 2010 : Resonant forcing of mixed layer inertial motions by atmospheric easterly waves in the northeast tropical Pacific . J. Phys. Oceanogr. , 40 , 401 – 416 , doi: 10.1175/2009JPO4276.1 . Mooers , C. N. K. , 1970 : The interaction of an internal tide with the frontal zone in a coastal

Full access
Andrey Y. Shcherbina, Miles A. Sundermeyer, Eric Kunze, Eric D’Asaro, Gualtiero Badin, Daniel Birch, Anne-Marie E. G. Brunner-Suzuki, Jörn Callies, Brandy T. Kuebel Cervantes, Mariona Claret, Brian Concannon, Jeffrey Early, Raffaele Ferrari, Louis Goodman, Ramsey R. Harcourt, Jody M. Klymak, Craig M. Lee, M.-Pascale Lelong, Murray D. Levine, Ren-Chieh Lien, Amala Mahadevan, James C. McWilliams, M. Jeroen Molemaker, Sonaljit Mukherjee, Jonathan D. Nash, Tamay Özgökmen, Stephen D. Pierce, Sanjiv Ramachandran, Roger M. Samelson, Thomas B. Sanford, R. Kipp Shearman, Eric D. Skyllingstad, K. Shafer Smith, Amit Tandon, John R. Taylor, Eugene A. Terray, Leif N. Thomas, and James R. Ledwell

.1–10 km), and the relative importance of various processes is not as well known. Contributions from both geostrophically balanced motions and internal gravity waves are expected, but their relative importance and the mechanisms by which they stir have not been quantified. Here, we discuss a recent campaign to improve our understanding of submesoscale stirring and mixing in the ocean interior. Traditionally, dynamic signals at the submesoscale have been thought to be dominated by the ubiquitous

Full access
Jörn Callies and Raffaele Ferrari

1. Introduction Atmospheric cooling and surface winds frequently mix the surface layer of the ocean. The resulting mixed layer mediates the transfer of heat and momentum between the atmosphere and ocean and thereby affects both the atmospheric climate and the oceanic general circulation. The evolution of the ocean mixed layer has traditionally been understood column by column; atmospheric cooling and wind forcing leads to mixing and deepening of the mixed layer into the thermocline below. It is

Full access
Gualtiero Badin, Amit Tandon, and Amala Mahadevan

. , and K. Hasselmann , 1982 : The horizontal diffusion of tracers by surface waves . J. Phys. Oceanogr. , 12 , 704 – 711 . Holmes-Cerfon , M. , O. Buehler , and R. Ferrari , 2011 : Particle dispersion by random waves in the rotating Boussinesq system . J. Fluid Mech. , 670 , 150 – 175 . Hoskins , B. J. , and F. P. Bretherton , 1972 : Atmospheric frontogenesis models: Mathematical formulation and solution . J. Atmos. Sci. , 29 , 11 – 37 . Houghton , R. W. , 1997

Full access
Leif N. Thomas, John R. Taylor, Eric A. D’Asaro, Craig M. Lee, Jody M. Klymak, and Andrey Shcherbina

cycle. This is simply a manifestation of PV conservation when purely advective processes are involved. However, the presence of negative PV in the boundary layer cannot be explained by conservative processes alone and is consistent with removal of PV from the ocean due to atmospheric forcing. Fig . 7. (a) Time series of the Ekman buoyancy flux [ (7) ] (black) and the air–sea buoyancy flux (red) expressed in units of buoyancy and heat flux on the left and right axes, respectively. Positive values

Full access