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Bryan T. Smith, Richard L. Thompson, Andrew R. Dean, and Patrick T. Marsh

Abstract

Radar-identified convective modes, peak low-level rotational velocities, and near-storm environmental data were assigned to a sample of tornadoes reported in the contiguous United States during 2009–13. The tornado segment data were filtered by the maximum enhanced Fujita (EF)-scale tornado event per hour using a 40-km horizontal grid. Convective mode was assigned to each tornado event by examining full volumetric Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler data at the beginning time of each event, and 0.5° peak rotational velocity (V rot) data were identified manually during the life span of each tornado event. Environmental information accompanied each grid-hour event, consisting primarily of supercell-related convective parameters from the hourly objective mesoscale analyses calculated and archived at the Storm Prediction Center. Results from examining environmental and radar attributes, featuring the significant tornado parameter (STP) and 0.5° peak V rot data, suggest an increasing conditional probability for greater EF-scale damage as both STP and 0.5° peak V rot increase, especially with supercells. Possible applications of these findings include using the conditional probability of tornado intensity as a real-time situational awareness tool.

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Eric P. Chassignet, Linda T. Smith, Rainer Bleck, and Frank O. Bryan

Abstract

A series of medium-resolution (∼1°) numerical simulations for the equatorial and North Atlantic basin have been performed with two primitive equation models, one employing depth and the other density as the vertical coordinate. The models have been configured for this exercise in as similar a fashion as their basic formulations allow, and with fundamentally identical initialization, boundary conditions, and forcing functions for each of the experiments. The purpose of comparing the models’ results is twofold: 1) to understand the degree to which model-generated circulation fields depend on the particular model architecture by examining the rate of divergence of the solutions of an isopycnic and a depth coordinate model given the same initial conditions and 2) to uncover and remedy possible defects in either model design. The comparison is focused on the importance in each simulation of the choice of mixing parameterization, which has a crucial impact on the meridional overturning circulation, on the associated northward heat transport, and on the evolution of water masses. Although the model-generated horizontal fields viewed at specific times during the integrations do not appear to be strongly dependent on the design of each model and are in good agreement with one another, the integrated properties of the depth coordinate model and the isopycnic coordinate model diverge significantly over time, with the depth coordinate model being unable to retain its most dense water masses after long integration periods.

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Jonathan M. Garner, William C. Iwasko, Tyler D. Jewel, Richard L. Thompson, and Bryan T. Smith

Abstract

A dataset maintained by the Storm Prediction Center (SPC) of 6300 tornado events from 2009 to 2015, consisting of radar-identified convective modes and near-storm environmental information obtained from Rapid Update Cycle and Rapid Refresh model analysis grids, has been augmented with additional radar information related to the low-level mesocyclones associated with tornado longevity, pathlength, and width. All EF2–EF5 tornadoes [as measured on the enhanced Fujita (EF) scale], in addition to randomly selected EF0–EF1 tornadoes, were extracted from the SPC dataset, which yielded 1268 events for inclusion in the current study. Analysis of those data revealed similar values of the effective-layer significant tornado parameter for the longest-lived (60+ min) tornadic circulations, longest-tracked (≥68 km) tornadoes, and widest tornadoes (≥1.2 km). However, the widest tornadoes occurring west of −94° longitude were associated with larger mean-layer convective available potential energy, storm-top divergence, and low-level rotational velocity. Furthermore, wide tornadoes occurred when low-level winds were out of the southeast, resulting in large low-level hodograph curvature and near-surface horizontal vorticity that was more purely streamwise when compared with long-lived and long-tracked events. On the other hand, tornado pathlength and longevity were maximized with eastward-migrating synoptic-scale cyclones associated with strong southwesterly wind profiles through much of the troposphere, fast storm motions, large values of bulk wind difference and storm-relative helicity, and lower buoyancy.

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Alexandra K. Anderson-Frey, Yvette P. Richardson, Andrew R. Dean, Richard L. Thompson, and Bryan T. Smith

Abstract

The southeastern United States has become a prime area of focus in tornado-related literature due, in part, to the abundance of tornadoes occurring in high-shear low-CAPE (HSLC) environments. Through this analysis of 4133 tornado events and 16 429 tornado warnings in the southeastern United States, we find that tornadoes in the Southeast do indeed have, on average, higher shear and lower CAPE than tornadoes elsewhere in the contiguous United States (CONUS). We also examine tornado warning skill in the form of probability of detection (POD; percent of tornadoes receiving warning prior to tornado occurrence) and false alarm ratio (FAR; percent of tornado warnings for which no corresponding tornado is detected), and find that, on average, POD is better and FAR is worse for tornadoes in the Southeast than for the CONUS as a whole. These measures of warning skill remain consistent even when we consider only HSLC tornadoes. The Southeast also has nearly double the CONUS percentage of deadly tornadoes, with the highest percentage of these deadly tornadoes occurring during the spring, the winter, and around local sunset. On average, however, the tornadoes with the lowest POD also tend to be those that are weakest and least likely to be deadly; for the most part, the most dangerous storms are indeed being successfully warned.

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Alexandra K. Anderson-Frey, Yvette P. Richardson, Andrew R. Dean, Richard L. Thompson, and Bryan T. Smith

Abstract

Between 2003 and 2015, there were 5343 outbreak tornadoes and 9389 isolated tornadoes reported in the continental United States. Here, the near-storm environmental parameter-space distributions of these two categories are compared via kernel density estimation, and the seasonal, diurnal, and geographical features of near-storm environments of these two sets of events are compared via self-organizing maps (SOMs). Outbreak tornadoes in a given geographical region tend to be characterized by greater 0–1-km storm-relative helicity and 0–6-km vector shear magnitude than isolated tornadoes in the same geographical region and also have considerably higher tornado warning-based probability of detection (POD) than isolated tornadoes. A SOM of isolated tornadoes highlights that isolated tornadoes with higher POD also tend to feature higher values of the significant tornado parameter (STP), regardless of the specific shape of the area of STP. For a SOM of outbreak tornadoes, when two outbreak environments with similarly high magnitudes but different patterns of STP are compared, the difference is primarily geographical, with one environment dominated by Great Plains and Midwest outbreaks and another dominated by outbreaks in the southeastern United States. Two specific tornado outbreaks are featured, and the events are placed into their climatological context with more nuance than typical single proximity sounding-based approaches would allow.

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Alexandra K. Anderson-Frey, Yvette P. Richardson, Andrew R. Dean, Richard L. Thompson, and Bryan T. Smith

Abstract

In this work, self-organizing maps (SOMs) are used to investigate patterns of favorable near-storm environmental parameters in a 13-yr climatology of 14 814 tornado events and 44 961 tornado warnings across the continental United States. Establishing nine statistically distinct clusters of spatial distributions of the significant tornado parameter (STP) in the 480 km × 480 km region surrounding each tornado event or warning allows for the examination of each cluster in isolation. For tornado events, distinct patterns are associated more with particular times of day, geographical locations, and times of year. For example, the archetypal springtime dryline setup in the Great Plains emerges readily from the data. While high values of STP tend to correspond to relatively high probabilities of detection (PODs) and relatively low false alarm ratios (FARs), the majority of tornado events occur within a pattern of uniformly lower STP, with relatively high FAR and low POD. Overall, the two-dimensional plots produced by the SOM approach provide an intuitive way of creating nuanced climatologies of tornadic near-storm environments.

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Bryan T. Smith, Richard L. Thompson, Jeremy S. Grams, Chris Broyles, and Harold E. Brooks

Abstract

Radar-based convective modes were assigned to a sample of tornadoes and significant severe thunderstorms reported in the contiguous United States (CONUS) during 2003–11. The significant hail (≥2-in. diameter), significant wind (≥65-kt thunderstorm gusts), and tornadoes were filtered by the maximum event magnitude per hour on a 40-km Rapid Update Cycle model horizontal grid. The filtering process produced 22 901 tornado and significant severe thunderstorm events, representing 78.5% of all such reports in the CONUS during the sample period. The convective mode scheme presented herein begins with three radar-based storm categories: 1) discrete cells, 2) clusters of cells, and 3) quasi-linear convective systems (QLCSs). Volumetric radar data were examined for right-moving supercell (RM) and left-moving supercell characteristics within the three radar reflectivity designations. Additional categories included storms with marginal supercell characteristics and linear hybrids with a mix of supercell and QLCS structures. Smoothed kernel density estimates of events per decade revealed clear geographic and seasonal patterns of convective modes with tornadoes. Discrete and cluster RMs are the favored convective mode with southern Great Plains tornadoes during the spring, while the Deep South displayed the greatest variability in tornadic convective modes in the fall, winter, and spring. The Ohio Valley favored a higher frequency of QLCS tornadoes and a lower frequency of RM compared to the Deep South and the Great Plains. Tornadoes with nonsupercellular/non-QLCS storms were more common across Florida and the high plains in the summer. Significant hail events were dominated by Great Plains supercells, while variations in convective modes were largest for significant wind events.

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Richard L. Thompson, Bryan T. Smith, Jeremy S. Grams, Andrew R. Dean, and Chris Broyles

Abstract

A sample of 22 901 tornado and significant severe thunderstorm events, filtered on an hourly 40-km grid, was collected for the period 2003–11 across the contiguous United States (CONUS). Convective mode was assigned to each case via manual examination of full volumetric radar data (Part I of this study), and environmental information accompanied each grid-hour event from the hourly objective analyses calculated and archived at the Storm Prediction Center (SPC). Sounding-derived parameters related to supercells and tornadoes formed the basis of this investigation owing to the dominance of right-moving supercells in tornado production and the availability of supercell-related convective parameters in the SPC environmental archive. The tornado and significant severe thunderstorm events were stratified by convective mode and season. Measures of buoyancy discriminated most strongly between supercell and quasi-linear convective system (QLCS) tornado events during the winter, while bulk wind differences and storm-relative helicity were similar for both supercell and QLCS tornado environments within in each season. The larger values of the effective-layer supercell composite parameter (SCP) and the effective-layer significant tornado parameter (STP) favored right-moving supercells that produced significant tornadoes, as opposed to weak tornadoes or supercells that produced only significant hail or damaging winds. Additionally, mesocyclone strength tended to increase with increasing SCP for supercells, and STP tended to increase as tornado damage class ratings increased. The findings underscore the importance of convective mode (discrete or cluster supercells), mesocyclone strength, and near-storm environment (as represented by large values of STP) in consistent, real-time identification of intense tornadoes.

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Alexandra K. Anderson-Frey, Yvette P. Richardson, Andrew R. Dean, Richard L. Thompson, and Bryan T. Smith
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Jerald A. Brotzge, Steven E. Nelson, Richard L. Thompson, and Bryan T. Smith

Abstract

The ability to provide advanced warning on tornadoes can be impacted by variations in storm mode. This research evaluates 2 yr of National Weather Service (NWS) tornado warnings, verification reports, and radar-derived convective modes to appraise the ability of the NWS to warn across a variety of convective modes and environmental conditions. Several specific hypotheses are considered: (i) supercell morphologies are the easiest convective modes to warn for tornadoes and yield the greatest lead times, while tornadoes from more linear, nonsupercell convective modes, such as quasi-linear convective systems, are more difficult to warn for; (ii) parameters such as tornado distance from radar, population density, and tornado intensity (F scale) introduce significant and complex variability into warning statistics as a function of storm mode; and (iii) tornadoes from stronger storms, as measured by their mesocyclone strength (when present), convective available potential energy (CAPE), vertical wind shear, and significant tornado parameter (STP) are easier to warn for than tornadoes from weaker systems. Results confirmed these hypotheses. Supercell morphologies caused 97% of tornado fatalities, 96% of injuries, and 92% of damage during the study period. Tornado warnings for supercells had a statistically higher probability of detection (POD) and lead time than tornado warnings for nonsupercells; among supercell storms, tornadoes from supercells in lines were slightly more difficult to warn for than tornadoes from discrete or clusters of supercells. F-scale intensity and distance from radar had some impact on POD, with less impact on lead times. Higher mesocyclone strength (when applicable), CAPE, wind shear, and STP values were associated with greater tornado POD and lead times.

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