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  • Author or Editor: Courtney Weeks x
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Sarah A. Tessendorf, Jeffrey R. French, Katja Friedrich, Bart Geerts, Robert M. Rauber, Roy M. Rasmussen, Lulin Xue, Kyoko Ikeda, Derek R. Blestrud, Melvin L. Kunkel, Shaun Parkinson, Jefferson R. Snider, Joshua Aikins, Spencer Faber, Adam Majewski, Coltin Grasmick, Philip T. Bergmaier, Andrew Janiszeski, Adam Springer, Courtney Weeks, David J. Serke, and Roelof Bruintjes

Abstract

The Seeded and Natural Orographic Wintertime Clouds: The Idaho Experiment (SNOWIE) project aims to study the impacts of cloud seeding on winter orographic clouds. The field campaign took place in Idaho between 7 January and 17 March 2017 and employed a comprehensive suite of instrumentation, including ground-based radars and airborne sensors, to collect in situ and remotely sensed data in and around clouds containing supercooled liquid water before and after seeding with silver iodide aerosol particles. The seeding material was released primarily by an aircraft. It was hypothesized that the dispersal of the seeding material from aircraft would produce zigzag lines of silver iodide as it dispersed downwind. In several cases, unambiguous zigzag lines of reflectivity were detected by radar, and in situ measurements within these lines have been examined to determine the microphysical response of the cloud to seeding. The measurements from SNOWIE aim to address long-standing questions about the efficacy of cloud seeding, starting with documenting the physical chain of events following seeding. The data will also be used to evaluate and improve computer modeling parameterizations, including a new cloud-seeding parameterization designed to further evaluate and quantify the impacts of cloud seeding.

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Sarah A. Tessendorf, Roelof T. Bruintjes, Courtney Weeks, James W. Wilson, Charles A. Knight, Rita D. Roberts, Justin R. Peter, Scott Collis, Peter R. Buseck, Evelyn Freney, Michael Dixon, Matthew Pocernich, Kyoko Ikeda, Duncan Axisa, Eric Nelson, Peter T. May, Harald Richter, Stuart Piketh, Roelof P. Burger, Louise Wilson, Steven T. Siems, Michael Manton, Roger C. Stone, Acacia Pepler, Don R. Collins, V. N. Bringi, M. Thurai, Lynne Turner, and David McRae

As a response to extreme water shortages in southeast Queensland, Australia, brought about by reduced rainfall and increasing population, the Queensland government decided to explore the potential for cloud seeding to enhance rainfall. The Queensland Cloud Seeding Research Program (QCSRP) was conducted in the southeast Queensland region near Brisbane during the 2008/09 wet seasons. In addition to conducting an initial exploratory, randomized (statistical) cloud seeding study, multiparameter radar measurements and in situ aircraft microphysical data were collected. This comprehensive set of observational platforms was designed to improve the physical understanding of the effects of both ambient aerosols and seeding material on precipitation formation in southeast Queensland clouds. This focus on gaining physical understanding, along with the unique combination of modern observational platforms utilized in the program, set it apart from previous cloud seeding research programs. The overarching goals of the QCSRP were to 1) determine the characteristics of local cloud systems (i.e., weather and climate), 2) document the properties of atmospheric aerosol and their microphysical effects on precipitation formation, and 3) assess the impact of cloud seeding on cloud microphysical and dynamical processes to enhance rainfall. During the course of the program, it became clear that there is great variability in the natural cloud systems in the southeast Queensland region, and understanding that variability would be necessary before any conclusions could be made regarding the impact of cloud seeding. This article presents research highlights and progress toward achieving the goals of the program, along with the challenges associated with conducting cloud seeding research experiments

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